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Definitions of earth

  1. (archaic) once thought to be one of four elements composing the universe (Empedocles) Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. hide in the earth, as of a hunted fox Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. a connection between an electrical device and the earth (which is a zero voltage) Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. the concerns of the world as distinguished from heaven and the afterlife; "they consider the church to be independent of the world" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. the abode of mortals (as contrasted with heaven or hell); "it was hell on earth" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. the 3rd planet from the sun; the planet on which we live; "the Earth moves around the sun"; "he sailed around the world" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. the loose soft material that makes up a large part of the land surface; "they dug into the earth outside the church" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. connect to the earth, as of a circuit Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. once thought to be one of four elements composing the universe (Empedocles) Wordnet Dictionary DB
  10. connect to the earth; "earth the circuit" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  11. hide in the earth like a hunted animal Wordnet Dictionary DB
  12. The globe or planet which we inhabit; the world, in distinction from the sun, moon, or stars. Also, this world as the dwelling place of mortals, in distinction from the dwelling place of spirits. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. The solid materials which make up the globe, in distinction from the air or water; the dry land. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. The softer inorganic matter composing part of the surface of the globe, in distinction from the firm rock; soil of all kinds, including gravel, clay, loam, and the like; sometimes, soil favorable to the growth of plants; the visible surface of the globe; the ground; as, loose earth; rich earth. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. A part of this globe; a region; a country; land. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. Worldly things, as opposed to spiritual things; the pursuits, interests, and allurements of this life. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. The people on the globe. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. Any earthy-looking metallic oxide, as alumina, glucina, zirconia, yttria, and thoria. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. A similar oxide, having a slight alkaline reaction, as lime, magnesia, strontia, baryta. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. A hole in the ground, where an animal hides himself; as, the earth of a fox. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. To hide, or cause to hide, in the earth; to chase into a burrow or den. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. To burrow. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  23. A plowing. Webster Dictionary DB
  24. The connection of any part an electric conductor with the ground; specif., the connection of a telegraph line with the ground through a fault or otherwise. Webster Dictionary DB
  25. To cover with earth or mold; to inter; to bury; - sometimes with up. Webster Dictionary DB
  26. The globe or planet on which we live; the solid materials which compose the globe; ground; soil; a region or land; worldly things or interests; the inhabitants of the globe. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  27. 1. The globe, world. 2. Soil, dirt, the loose material on the surface of the earth. 3. An insoluble oxide of aluminum or of certain other elements. A practical medical dictionary. By Stedman, Thomas Lathrop. Published 1920.
  28. The matter on the surface of the globe: soil: dry land, as opposed to sea: the world: the people of this world. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  29. To hide or cause to hide in the earth: to bury. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  30. Soil; dry land; the world. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  31. The globe on which we dwell; the world; ground; land; soil. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  32. The particles which compose the solid mass of the globe; the particles which form the fine mould on its surface; any indefinite mass or portion of that matter; certain metallic oxides; the globe as a planet; the world, as opposed to other scenes of existence; its inhabitants; dry land, opposed to the sea; country, region, or a distinct part of the globe; the ground; a low condition. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  33. To hide in the earth, as to earth a fox; to cover with earth. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  34. To retire underground; to burrow. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  35. Mould; hole of a fox; the mass of the globe; the ground; land; the world; its inhabitants; in chem., a solid, opaque, friable substance, without lustre, and incombustible. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  36. To hide in the ground; to cover with mould; to burrow. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  37. The term is used in two widely-different senses: (1) for the material of which the earths surface is composed; (2) as the name of the planet on which man dwells. The Hebrew language discriminates between these two by the use of separate terms, adamah for the former, erets for the latter. 1. Adamah is the earth in the sense of soil or ground, particularly as being susceptible of cultivation. ( Genesis 2:7 ) 2. Erets is applied in a more or less extended sense-- (1) to the whole world, ( Genesis 1:1 ) (2) to land as opposed to sea, ( Genesis 1:10 ) (3) to a country, ( Genesis 21:32 ) (4) to a plot of ground, ( Genesis 23:15 ) and (5) to the ground on which a man stands. ( Genesis 33:3 ) The two former senses alone concern us, the fairest involving an inquiry into the opinions of the Hebrews on cosmogony, the second on geography. 3. cosmogony. -- (1) The Hebrew cosmogony is based upon the leading principle that the universe exists, not independently of God, nor yet co-existent with God, nor yet in opposition to him as a hostile element, but dependently upon him, subsequently to him and in subjection to him. (2) Creation was regarded as a progressive work --a gradual development from the inferior to the superior orders of things. 4. Geography. --There seems to be traces of the same ideas as prevailed among the Greeks, that the world was a disk, ( Isaiah 40:22 ) bordered by the ocean, with Jerusalem as its centre, like Delphi as the navel, or, according to another view, the highest point of the world. As to the size of the earth, the Hebrews had but a very indefinite notion. biblestudytools.com
  38. In the sense of soil or ground, the translation of the word adamah' . In Genesis 9:20 "husbandman" is literally "man of the ground or earth." Altars were to be built of earth ( Exodus 20:24 ). Naaman asked for two mules' burden of earth ( 2 Kings 5:17 ), under the superstitious notion that Jehovah, like the gods of the heathen, could be acceptably worshipped only on his own soil. (2). As the rendering of 'erets , it means the whole world ( Genesis 1:2 ); the land as opposed to the sea ( 1:10 ). Erets also denotes a country ( 21:32 ); a plot of ground ( 23:15 ); the ground on which a man stands ( 33:3 ); the inhabitants of the earth ( 6:1 ; 11:1 ); all the world except Israel ( 2 Chronicles 13:9 ). In the New Testament "the earth" denotes the land of Judea ( Matthew 23:35 ); also things carnal in contrast with things heavenly ( John 3:31 ; Colossians 3:1 Colossians 3:2 ). These dictionary topics are fromM.G. Easton M.A., D.D., Illustrated Bible Dictionary, Third Edition,published by Thomas Nelson, 1897. Public Domain, copy freely.[N] indicates this entry was also found in Nave's Topical Bible[S] indicates this entry was also found in Smith's Bible DictionaryBibliography InformationEaston, Matthew George. "Entry for Earth". "Easton's Bible Dictionary". . biblestudytools.com
  39. To cover with earth or mold; to inter; to bury; -- sometimes with up. mso.anu.edu.au
  40. [.e]rth, n. the name applied to the third planet in order from the sun: the matter on the surface of the globe: soil: dry land, as opposed to sea: the world: the inhabitants of the world: dirt: dead matter: the human body: a fox's hole: (pl.) the name applied by the alchemists and earlier chemists to certain substances now known to be oxides of metal, which were distinguished by being infusible, and by insolubility in water.--v.t. to hide or cause to hide in the earth: to bury.--v.i. to burrow: to hide.--ns. EARTH'-BAG, a sack of earth used in fortifications; EARTH'-BATH, a bath of earth or mud; EARTH'-BOARD, the board of a plough, or other implement, that turns over the earth.--adjs. EARTH'-BORN, born from or on the earth; EARTH'-BOUND, bound or held by the earth, as a tree; EARTH'-BRED, mean, grovelling.--n. EARTH'-CLOS'ET, a system consisting of the application of earth to the deodorisation of fæcal matters.--adjs. EARTH'-CRE[=A]'TED, made of earth; EARTH'EN, made of earth or clay: earthly.--ns. EARTH'ENWARE, crockery; EARTH'-FALL, a landslide.--adj. EARTH'-FED, contented with earthly things.--ns. EARTH'FLAX, asbestos; EARTH'-HOG (see AARDVARK); EARTH'-HOUSE, the name given to the ancient underground dwellings in Ireland and Scotland, also called Picts' houses; EARTH'-HUNG'ER, the passion for acquiring land; EARTH'INESS; EARTH'LINESS; EARTH'LING, a dweller on the earth.--adjs. EARTH'LY, belonging to the earth: vile: worldly; EARTH'LY-MIND'ED, having the mind intent on earthly things.--ns. EARTH'LY-MIND'EDNESS; EARTH'-NUT, the popular name of certain tuberous roots growing underground; EARTH'-PEA, the hog-peanut; EARTH'-PLATE, a buried plate of metal forming the earth-connection of a telegraph-wire, lightning-conductor, &c.; EARTH'QUAKE, a quaking or shaking of the earth: a heaving of the ground; EARTH'-SHINE, the faint light visible on the part of the moon not illuminated by the sun; EARTH'-TREM'OR, a slight earthquake.--adv. EARTH'WARD, toward the earth.--ns. EARTH'WORK, a fortification of earth; EARTH'-WORM, the common worm: a mean person, a poor creature.--adj. EARTH'Y, consisting of, relating to, or resembling earth: inhabiting the earth: gross: unrefined. [A.S. eorthe; cf. Dut. aarde, Ger. erde.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  41. The soil or pulverulent material forming the substance of the ground. E. has been used as an absorbent and protective in skin diseases. na
  42. Any amorphous, readily powdered mineral substance. Alkaline es, the group of minerals comprising magnesia, baryta, lime, and strontia. na
  43. (pl. only as below). The ground, as it fell to e.; (w. pl.) hole of badger, fox, &c.; the dry land; land& sea opp. The (material) heaven; this world opp. Heaven or hell (why &c. on e.? why EVER?); (w. pl.) soil, mould; (Chem., w. pl.) any of certain metallic oxides, uninflammable, & having little taste or smell; (Electr., w. pl.) communication with c. as completion of circuit; e.-born, of mortal race, (Myth.) emerging from e. at birth; e.- (substitute for WATER) closet; e.-light, -shine, partial illumination of dark part of moon by light from e.; e.-nut, pig-nut& other plants; earthwork, bank of e. used in fortification; earthworm, worm living in ground, (fig.) grovelling person. Hence earthward (s) adv. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  44. Cover (roots of plants) with heaped-up earth; drive (fox) to earth; (intr., of fox) run to earth. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  45. who, what, why, where, &c., on e.?, who &c. ever? (in questions expr. surprise, curiosity, impatience, &c.); nothing one., nothing at all, nothing whatever. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  46. The powdery part of the crust of the globe. It is mainly made up of the following elements: so per cent. oxygen, 25 per cent. silicon, 7 per cent. aluminium, 5 per cent. iron, 3 per cent. calcium, and 2 per cent. each of magnesium, sodium, and potassium. Appleton's medical dictionary.
  47. n. [Anglo-Saxon] The globe we inhabit; the world;—the solid materials which make up the globe; the dry land;— soil of all kinds, including gravel, clay, loam, &c.;— a region; a country;—the people on the globe;—a hole in the ground; a foxhole;—a tasteless and inodorous, uncoloured, metallic oxide. Cabinet Dictionary
  48. The element distinct from air, fire, or water; the terraqueous globe, the world. Complete Dictionary

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