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Definitions of earth

  1. To retire underground; to burrow. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  2. To hide, or cause to hide, in the earth; to chase into a burrow or den. Webster Dictionary DB
  3. To cover with earth or mold; to inter; to bury; - sometimes with up. Webster Dictionary DB
  4. To hide or cause to hide in the earth: to bury. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  5. To burrow. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  6. connect to the earth, as of a circuit Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. To hide in the earth, as to earth a fox; to cover with earth. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  8. To hide in the ground; to cover with mould; to burrow. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  9. a connection between an electrical device and the earth (which is a zero voltage) Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. the concerns of the world as distinguished from heaven and the afterlife; "they consider the church to be independent of the world" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. the abode of mortals (as contrasted with heaven or hell); "it was hell on earth" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  12. the loose soft material that makes up a large part of the land surface; "they dug into the earth outside the church" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  13. once thought to be one of four elements composing the universe (Empedocles) Wordnet Dictionary DB
  14. connect to the earth; "earth the circuit" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  15. hide in the earth like a hunted animal Wordnet Dictionary DB
  16. The globe or planet which we inhabit; the world, in distinction from the sun, moon, or stars. Also, this world as the dwelling place of mortals, in distinction from the dwelling place of spirits. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. The solid materials which make up the globe, in distinction from the air or water; the dry land. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. A part of this globe; a region; a country; land. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. Worldly things, as opposed to spiritual things; the pursuits, interests, and allurements of this life. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. The people on the globe. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. Any earthy-looking metallic oxide, as alumina, glucina, zirconia, yttria, and thoria. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. A similar oxide, having a slight alkaline reaction, as lime, magnesia, strontia, baryta. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. A hole in the ground, where an animal hides himself; as, the earth of a fox. Webster Dictionary DB
  24. A plowing. Webster Dictionary DB
  25. The connection of any part an electric conductor with the ground; specif., the connection of a telegraph line with the ground through a fault or otherwise. Webster Dictionary DB
  26. The globe or planet on which we live; the solid materials which compose the globe; ground; soil; a region or land; worldly things or interests; the inhabitants of the globe. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  27. The matter on the surface of the globe: soil: dry land, as opposed to sea: the world: the people of this world. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  28. Soil; dry land; the world. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  29. The particles which compose the solid mass of the globe; the particles which form the fine mould on its surface; any indefinite mass or portion of that matter; certain metallic oxides; the globe as a planet; the world, as opposed to other scenes of existence; its inhabitants; dry land, opposed to the sea; country, region, or a distinct part of the globe; the ground; a low condition. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  30. Mould; hole of a fox; the mass of the globe; the ground; land; the world; its inhabitants; in chem., a solid, opaque, friable substance, without lustre, and incombustible. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.

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Usage examples for earth

  1. I wonder who on earth it can be!" – Dr. Jolliffe's Boys by Lewis Hough
  2. What on earth did you do it for? – A Thief in the Night by E. W. Hornung
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