Spellcheck.net

Definitions of glass

  1. amphetamine used in the form of a crystalline hydrochloride; used as a stimulant to the nervous system and as an appetite suppressant Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. a glass container for holding liquids while drinking Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. a small refracting telescope Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. furnish with glass, as of a window Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. glassware collectively; "She collected old glass" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. a mirror; usually a ladies' dressing mirror Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. the quantity a glass will hold Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. a brittle transparent solid with irregular atomic structure Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. become glassy; of eyes; "Her eyes glaze over when she is bored" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. put in a glass container Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. enclose with glass; "glass in a porch" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  12. become glassy or take on a glass-like appearance; "Her eyes glaze over when she is bored" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  13. scan (game in the forest) with binoculars Wordnet Dictionary DB
  14. furnish with glass; "glass the windows" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  15. A hard, brittle, translucent, and commonly transparent substance, white or colored, having a conchoidal fracture, and made by fusing together sand or silica with lime, potash, soda, or lead oxide. It is used for window panes and mirrors, for articles of table and culinary use, for lenses, and various articles of ornament. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. Any substance having a peculiar glassy appearance, and a conchoidal fracture, and usually produced by fusion. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. Anything made of glass. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. A looking-glass; a mirror. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. A vessel filled with running sand for measuring time; an hourglass; and hence, the time in which such a vessel is exhausted of its sand. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. A drinking vessel; a tumbler; a goblet; hence, the contents of such a vessel; especially; spirituous liquors; as, he took a glass at dinner. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. A weatherglass; a barometer. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. To case in glass. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  23. To cover or furnish with glass; to glaze. Webster Dictionary DB
  24. To smooth or polish anything, as leater, by rubbing it with a glass burnisher. Webster Dictionary DB
  25. To reflect, as in a mirror. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  26. An optical glass; a lens; a spyglass; - in the plural, spectacles; as, a pair of glasses; he wears glasses. Webster Dictionary DB
  27. To reflect, as in a mirror; to mirror; - used reflexively. Webster Dictionary DB
  28. Hard, amorphous, brittle, inorganic, usually transparent, polymerous silicate of basic oxides, usually potassium or sodium. It is used in the form of hard sheets, vessels, tubing, fibers, ceramics, beads, etc. Medical Dictionary DB
  29. A hard, brittle, transparent substance, white or colored, made by melting together sand or silica with lime, potash, soda, or lead oxide, and used for window-panes, mirrors, dishes, etc.; a drinking glass, or the quantity contained in it; a mirror; lens; a telescope, or barometer. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  30. A transparent brittle substance, a compound of silica with various bases. A practical medical dictionary. By Stedman, Thomas Lathrop. Published 1920.
  31. The hard, brittle, transparent substance in windows: anything made of glass, esp. a drinking vessel, a mirror, etc.:-pl. spectacles: the quantity of liquid a glass holds. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  32. Made of glass. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  33. GLASSLIKE. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  34. Brittle transparent substance made from alkalies and silex; anything made of glass, as a cup, mirror, lens. &c. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  35. To cover with glass. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  36. To glaze. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  37. A transparent, brittle compound of silica with metallic oxids. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  38. Any article made wholly or partly of glass, as a mirror or a drinking-vessel; in the plural, spectacles or eye-glasses. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  39. The contents of a drinking-glass. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  40. Made of glass; vitreous. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  41. A hard, brittle, transparent substance, formed by fusing silicious matter with fixed alkalies; a drinking vessel of glass; the quantity of liquor that a glass vessel contains; strong drink; a mirror; a vessel filled with sand for measuring time; the time in which it is exhausted of sand; the destined time of man's life; a vessel that shows the weight of the air; a lens or optical instrument through which an object is viewed; a telescope; a barometer. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  42. To mirror; to case in glass; to cover with glass; to glaze. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  43. A hard, brittle, transparent substance, made by fusing powdered flint or fine sand with some alkali; a small drinking-vessel; the quantity contained therein; a mirror; a scientific instrument, as a prospect-glass, a weather-glass. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  44. The Hebrew word occurs only in ( Job 28:17 ) where in the Authorized Version it is rendered "crystal." In spite of the absence of specific allusion to glass in the sacred writings, the Hebrews must have been aware of the invention from paintings representing the process of glass-blowing, which have been discovered at Beni-hassan, and in tombs at other places, we know that the invention vas known at least 3500 years ago. Fragments too of wine-vases as old as the exodus have been discovered in Egypt. The art was also known to the ancient Assyrians. In the New Testament glass is alluded to as an emblem of brightness. ( Revelation 4:6 ; 15:2 ; 21:18 ) biblestudytools.com
  45. An optical glass; a lens; a spyglass; -- in the plural, spectacles; as, a pair of glasses; he wears glasses. mso.anu.edu.au
  46. To reflect, as in a mirror; to mirror; -- used reflexively. mso.anu.edu.au
  47. was known to the Egyptians at a very early period of their national history, at least B.C. 1500. Various articles both useful and ornamental were made of it, as bottles, vases, etc. A glass bottle with the name of Sargon on it was found among the ruins of the north-west palace of Nimroud. The Hebrew word zekukith ( Job 28:17 ), rendered in the Authorized Version "crystal," is rightly rendered in the Revised Version "glass." This is the only allusion to glass found in the Old Testament. It is referred to in the New Testament in Revelation 4:6 ; 15:2 ; Revelation 21:18 Revelation 21:21 . In Job 37:18 , the word rendered "looking-glass" is in the Revised Version properly rendered "mirror," formed, i.e., of some metal. (Compare Exodus 38:8 : "looking-glasses" are brazen mirrors, RSV). A mirror is referred to also in James 1:23 . biblestudytools.com
  48. transparent material, Solid but easily breakable. Man-made; does not break down organically. material that is usually and breaks easily. For example, used for windows, eye glasses, and bottles. Made by fusing sand, sodium carbonate, and calcium carbonate under extreme heat. thelawdictionary.org
  49. glas, n. a combination of silica with some alkali or alkaline earth, such as lime, &c., used for window panes, mirrors, lenses, &c.: anything made of glass, esp. a drinking-vessel, a mirror, &c.: the quantity of liquid a glass holds: any fused substance like glass, with a vitreous fracture: (pl.) spectacles.--adj. made of glass.--v.t. to case in glass.--ns. GLASS'-BLOW'ER, one who blows and fashions glass; GLASS'-BLOW'ING, the process of making glass, by taking a mass of glass reduced by heat to a viscid state, and inflating it; GLASS'-COACH, a coach for hire having glazed windows; GLASS'-CRAB, the larval form of rock lobsters, &c., but formerly regarded as adults, and made into a genus or even family; GLASS'-CUT'TER; GLASS'-CUT'TING, the act or process of cutting, shaping, and ornamenting the surface of glass.--adj. GLASS'-FACED (Shak.), reflecting the sentiments of another, as in a mirror.--n. GLASS'FUL, the contents of a glass.--adj. GLASS'-GAZ'ING (Shak.), addicted to viewing one's self in a mirror.--ns. GLASS'-GRIND'ING, the ornamenting of glass by rubbing with sand, emery, &c.; GLASS'-HOUSE, a glass manufactory: a house made of glass.--adv. GLASS'ILY.--n. GLASS'INESS.--adj. GLASS'-LIKE.--ns. GLASS'-PAINT'ING, the art of producing pictures on glass by means of staining it chemically; GLASS'-P[=A]'PER, paper coated with finely pounded glass, and used like sand-paper; GLASS'-SOAP, an oxide of manganese and other substances used by glass-blowers to remove colouring from glass; GLASS'WARE, articles made of glass; GLASS'-WORK, articles made of glass; GLASS'WORT, a plant so called from its yielding soda, used in making glass.--adjs. GLASS'Y, made of or like glass; GLASS'Y-HEAD'ED (Tenn.), having a bald, shining head.--ns. CUT'-GLASS, flint-glass shaped or ornamented by cutting or grinding on a wheel; GROUND'-GLASS, any glass that has been depolished by a sand-blast, grinding, or etching with acids, so as to destroy its transparency; PLATE'-GLASS, glass cast in large thick plates.--LIVE IN A GLASS HOUSE=to be open to attack or retort.--MUSICAL GLASSES (see HARMONICA).--WATER, or SOLUBLE, GLASS, the soluble silicate of soda or of potash formed when silica is fused with an excess of alkali, used for hardening artificial stone, as a cement, and for rendering calico, &c., uninflammable. [A.S. glæs; Dut., Ger., and Sw. glas; cog. with glow, gleam, glance, glare.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  50. A homogeneous, transparent, brittle substance, composed mainly of silicic acid partly free and partly compounded with one or more metals. The chief varieties of g. are Crown g., a hard but fusible g. consisting of silicate of sodium and calcium; Bohemian g., a very infusible g. consisting of silicate of potassium and calcium; Flint g. (Lead g.), more fusible and lustrous than the other kinds, consisting of a silicate of potassium and lead. G. is used for making lenses, and in the best lenses a piece of crown g. is combined with one of flint g. so as to produce an achromatic combination. A meshwork of flexible filaments of g. (Spun g., G. wool) is occasionally used as a drainage material for wounds, Liquid g. Water g., solution of sodium silicate; used in making immovable apparatus for fractures, etc. na
  51. Anything made of g.; especially, a g. drinking-vessel containing about half a pint; also a lens made of g., as Magnifying g., Convex g., Object-g. of a microscope (see Lens). na
  52. Substance, usu. transparent, lustrous, hard, & brittle, made by fusing sand with soda or potash or both& other ingredients (CROWN, FLINT, PLATE, WATER, -g.); substances of similar properties or composition, as g. of antimony, vitreous oxy-sulphide fused; g. utensils, ornaments, windows, greenhouses; g. vessel esp. for drinking, amount of liquid contained in this, drink; sand-g., hour-g.; carriage-window; plate of g. covering picture; glazed frame for plants; looking-g.; eye-g., (pl.) pair of spectacles; lens; g. disk covering watch face; telescope, spy-g., field-g., opera-g., microscope; barometer. weather-g.; g.-blower, one who blows& shapes g.; g.-case, chiefly of g. for exhibiting or protecting objects; g.-cloth, linen cloth for drying gg., cloth, woven fabric of dered g. like g.-paper; g. cloth, woven fabric of fine-spun g.; g.-cutter, workman, tool, cutting g.; g.-culture, of plants under g.; g.-dust, powdered g. for polishing; g. eye, false eye of g., kind of blindness in horses; g.-house, building where g. is made, greenhouse, g.-roofed photo-graphing-room; g.-paper, covered with g.-dust; g.-ware, articles made of g.; glasswort, kinds of plant formerly used in g.-making. Hence glassful n., glassless a. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  53. Fit with g., glaze, (rare); enclose ing. (rare); make (the eye) glassy (rare); mirror, occasion reflection of (often refl., as trees g. themselves in the lake); glassing-jack, machine used in dressing leather. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  54. has had a g. too much, is drunk. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  55. A hard, brittle, homogeneous, transparent substance, made by melting sand and consisting essentially of a metallic silicate with silicic acid, with soda or potash, etc. Appleton's medical dictionary.
  56. A lens, mirror, or other implement having its essential parts made of that material. Appleton's medical dictionary.
  57. In the pl., glasses, spectacles; lenses, prisms, or plane, usually oval sheets of glass mounted to be worn before the eyes for the correction of visual defects or for purposes of protection. Appleton's medical dictionary.
  58. [One of a vast number of words containing the root gal, to shine.] (Naut.) A half-hour sand-glass, used on board ship to measure time by ; e.g. three glasses = an hour and a half. Half-minute and quarter-minute glasses are used to measure the running out of the log-line. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  59. n. [Anglo-Saxon, Dutch, Danish, Swedish, Icelandic] A hard, brittle, transparent substance formed by fusing sand with fixed alkalies;—a looking-glass; a mirror;—a glass filled with running sand for measuring time; the time in which a glass is exhausted of its sand; hence, measure of time; destined period of life;—a drinking glass; a tumbler; wine glass;—the quantity contained therein; draught;—a perspective instrument; telescope; spyglass; opera glass, &c.;—an instrument to indicate the weight of the air; barometer;—pl., Spectacles. Cabinet Dictionary
  60. An artificial substance made by fusing salts and flint or sand together, with a vehement fire; a glass vessel of any kind; a looking-glass, a mirrour; a glass to help the sight; An Hour Glass, a glass used in measuring time by the flux of sand; a cup of glass used to drink in; the quantity of wine usually contained in a glass; a perspective glass. Complete Dictionary
  61. Vitreous, made of glass. Complete Dictionary

What are the misspellings for glass?

X