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Definitions of mood

  1. Manner of conceiving and expressing action or being, as positive, possible, hypothetical, etc., without regard to other accidents, such as time, person, number, etc.; as, the indicative mood; the infinitive mood; the subjunctive mood. Same as Mode. Webster Dictionary DB
  2. Temper of mind; temporary state of the mind in regard to passion or feeling; humor; as, a melancholy mood; a suppliant mood. Webster Dictionary DB
  3. Temper of mind; change in the form of a verb to express the manner of action or being. Also, mode. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  4. Fashion: manner: (gram.) a form of verbal inflection to express the mode or manner of action or being: (logic) the form of the syllogism as determined by the quantity and quality of its three constituent propositions: (mus.) the arrangement of the intervals in the scale, as major and minor. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  5. Disposition of mind: temporary state of the mind: anger: heat of temper. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  6. Temper of mind; humor; form of conjugation of the verb. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  7. Same as MODE. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  8. Temporary state of the mind; caprice; humor. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  9. The state of being moody. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  10. Mode; a variation of form in a verb to express the manner in which the action or fact denoted by the verb is conceived in connection with the subject; the form of a syllogism as regards the quantity and quality of its propositions when arranged in the first figure; arrangement of the intervals. See Mode. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  11. Temper of mind; humour or disposition. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  12. Disposition of mind; temper of mind; disposition. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  13. In gram., a certain form of inflection indicating the mode or manner, as regards action, in which the meaning of the verb is presented to the learner, as indicative mood, impera. mood; in logic, the form of a syllogism, as determined by the quantity and quality of the three propositions by which it is formed; style of music. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.

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Usage examples for mood

  1. That will put them in a good mood – The Guests Of Hercules by C. N. Williamson and A. M. Williamson
  2. We are to change our mood from laughter to tears upon a sudden discovery that the character belonged to a man of genius; and this we had already known from the beginning. – Biographical Essays by Thomas de Quincey
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