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Definitions of seal

  1. an indication of approved or superior status Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. affix a seal to Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. any of numerous marine mammals that come on shore to breed; chiefly of cold regions Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. a device incised to make an impression; used to secure a closing or to authenticate documents Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. fastener that provides a tight and perfect closure Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. a finishing coat applied to exclude moisture Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. fastener consisting of a resinous composition that is plastic when warm; used for sealing documents and parcels and letters Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. a stamp affixed to a document (as to attest to its authenticity or to seal it); "the warrant bore the sheriff's seal" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. the pelt or fur (especially the underfur) of a seal; "a coat of seal" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. hunt seals Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. cover with varnish Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  12. make tight; secure against leakage; "seal the windows" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  13. a member of a Naval Special Warfare unit who is trained for unconventional warfare; "SEAL is an acronym for Sea Air and Land" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  14. decide irrevocably; "sealing dooms" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  15. close with or as if with a seal; "She sealed the letter with hot wax" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  16. affix a seal to; "seal the letter" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  17. A compound hydraulic valve for regulating the passage of the gas through a set of purifiers so as to cut out each one in turn for the renewal of the lime. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. Any aquatic carnivorous mammal of the families Phocidae and Otariidae. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. An engraved or inscribed stamp, used for marking an impression in wax or other soft substance, to be attached to a document, or otherwise used by way of authentication or security. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. Wax, wafer, or other tenacious substance, set to an instrument, and impressed or stamped with a seal; as, to give a deed under hand and seal. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. That which seals or fastens; esp., the wax or wafer placed on a letter or other closed paper, etc., to fasten it. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. That which confirms, ratifies, or makes stable; that which authenticates; that which secures; assurance. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. An arrangement for preventing the entrance or return of gas or air into a pipe, by which the open end of the pipe dips beneath the surface of water or other liquid, or a deep bend or sag in the pipe is filled with the liquid; a draintrap. Webster Dictionary DB
  24. To set or affix a seal to; hence, to authenticate; to confirm; to ratify; to establish; as, to seal a deed. Webster Dictionary DB
  25. To mark with a stamp, as an evidence of standard exactness, legal size, or merchantable quality; as, to seal weights and measures; to seal silverware. Webster Dictionary DB
  26. To fasten with a seal; to attach together with a wafer, wax, or other substance causing adhesion; as, to seal a letter. Webster Dictionary DB
  27. Hence, to shut close; to keep close; to make fast; to keep secure or secret. Webster Dictionary DB
  28. To fix, as a piece of iron in a wall, with cement, plaster, or the like. Webster Dictionary DB
  29. To close by means of a seal; as, to seal a drainpipe with water. See 2d Seal, 5. Webster Dictionary DB
  30. Among the Mormons, to confirm or set apart as a second or additional wife. Webster Dictionary DB
  31. To affix one's seal, or a seal. Webster Dictionary DB
  32. A flesh-eating sea animal valuable for its skin and oil; a stamp or die engraved with some device, used for making an impression in wax; wax or other soft substance fixed upon a letter, document, etc., and marked with such a stamp; any act that approves or confirms; a device, as stamped wax, used for securing an envelope, etc.; hence, that which fastens. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  33. To fasten with a device so that it cannot be tampered with; as, to seal a letter; set or affix a seal to; ratify or confirm; secure or give guaranty for; keep secure or secret; settle beyond question: as, to seal his fate. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  34. To hunt seals. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  35. An engraved stamp for impressing the wax which closes a letter, etc.: the wax or other substance so impressed: that which makes fast or secure: that which authenticates or ratifies: assurance. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  36. To fasten with a seal: to set a seal to: to mark with a stamp: to make fast: to confirm: to keep secure. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  37. A marine animal valuable for its skin and oil. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  38. To fix a seal. "Yes Shylook, I will seal unto this bond."-Shak. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  39. A marine carnivorous animal; stamp for impressing wax, &c.; impression of a seal; that which secures or authenticates. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  40. To fix a seal to; fasten with a seal or with any plastic substance; confirm. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  41. To fasten with a seal; put a seal upon; close tightly; keep secret; confirm. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  42. An instrument used for making an impression upon wax or the like; also, the impression so made, or the substance bearing such impression and affixed to a document. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  43. Anything that fastens securely. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  44. Anything that authenticates; a pledge; guaranty. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  45. An aquatic carnivorous mammal of high latitudes, yielding valuable fur. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  46. An aquatic carnivorous mammal, valuable for its skin and oil. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  47. A stamp or die, engraved with some image or device, or its impression; the wax set to an instrument, and stamped with a seal; the wax that fastens a letter; any act of confirmation; that which confirms or ratifies; that which makes fast. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  48. To fasten with a seal; to set a seal to; to ratify or confirm; to shut close; to make fast; to mark with a stamp; to close; to inclose; to impress; to catch seals. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  49. A marine amphibious animal of various species, chiefly inhabiting the sea-coasts of the higher latitudes, much sought after for its skin and oil; the sea-calf; the sea-dog. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  50. An engraved or inscribed piece of metal; a precious stone, a pebble, or a piece of metal, on which some image or device is engraved, used for impressing the wax that closes a letter, or that which is attached to a deed or other parchment or writing; that which ratifies or confirms; an act of confirmation; that which shuts or makes fast. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  51. To fasten with; to set or affix a seal to; to ratify; to make fast; to authenticate with a stamp; to enclose, hide, or conceal; to imprint on the mind. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  52. The importance attached to seals in the East is so great that without one no document is regarded as authentic. Among the methods of sealing used in Egypt at a very early period were engraved stones, graved stones, pierced through their length and hung by a string or chain from the arm or neck, or set in rings for the finger. The most ancient form used for this purpose was the scarabaeus, formed of precious or common stone, or even of blue pottery or porcelain, on the flat side of which the inscription or device was engraved. In many cases the seal consisted of a lump of clay, impressed with the seal and attached to the document, whether of papyrus or other material, by strings. In other cases wax was used. In sealing a sepulchre or box, the fastening was covered with clay or wax, and the impression from a seal of one in authority was stamped upon it, so that it could not be broken open without discovery. The signet-ring was an ordinary part of a mans equipment. ( Genesis 38:18 ) The ring or the seal as an emblem of authority in Egypt, Persia and elsewhere is mentioned in ( Genesis 41:42 ; 1 Kings 21:8 ; Esther 3:10 Esther 3:12 ; 8:2 ; Daniel 6:17 ) and as an evidence of a covenant, in ( Jeremiah 32:10 Jeremiah 32:44 ; Nehemiah 9:38 ; 10:1 ; Haggai 2:23 ) Engraved signets were in use among the Hebrews in early times. ( Exodus 28:11 Exodus 28:36 ; 39:6 ) biblestudytools.com
  53. commonly a ring engraved with some device ( Genesis 38:18 Genesis 38:25 ). Jezebel "wrote letters in Ahab's name, and sealed them with his seal" ( 1 Kings 21:8 ). Seals are frequently mentioned in Jewish history ( Deuteronomy 32:34 ; Nehemiah 9:38 ; 10:1 ; Esther 3:12 ; Cant 8:6 ; Isaiah 8:16 ; Jeremiah 22:24 ; 32:44 , etc.). Sealing a document was equivalent to the signature of the owner of the seal. "The use of a signet-ring by the monarch has recently received a remarkable illustration by the discovery of an impression of such a signet on fine clay at Koyunjik, the site of the ancient Nineveh. This seal appears to have been impressed from the bezel of a metallic finger-ring. It is an oval, 2 inches in length by 1 inch wide, and bears the image, name, and titles of the Egyptian king Sabaco" (Rawlinson's Hist. Illus. of the O.T., p. 46). The actual signet-rings of two Egyptian kings (Cheops and Horus) have been discovered. (See SIGNET .) The use of seals is mentioned in the New Testament only in connection with the record of our Lord's burial ( Matthew 27:66 ). The tomb was sealed by the Pharisees and chief priests for the purpose of making sure that the disciples would not come and steal the body away (ver. 63,64). The mode of doing this was probably by stretching a cord across the stone and sealing it at both ends with sealing-clay. When God is said to have sealed the Redeemer, the meaning is, that he has attested his divine mission ( John 6:27 ). Circumcision is a seal, an attestation of the covenant ( Romans 4:11 ). Believers are sealed with the Spirit, as God's mark put upon them ( Ephesians 1:13 ; 4:30 ). Converts are by Paul styled the seal of his apostleship, i.e., they are its attestation ( 1 Corinthians 9:2 ). Seals and sealing are frequently mentioned in the book of ( Revelation 5:1 ; 6:1 ; 7:3 ; 10:4 ; 22:10 ). biblestudytools.com
  54. s[=e]l, n. an engraved stamp for impressing the wax which closes a letter, &c.: the wax or other substance so impressed: that which makes fast or secure: that which authenticates or ratifies: assurance: the water left standing in the trap of a drain or sewer, preventing the upward flow of gas: the sigil or signature of a plant, &c., in medieval medicine: the sign of the cross, baptism, confirmation, the ineffaceable character supposed to be left on the soul by some sacraments.--v.t. to fasten with a seal: to set a seal to: to mark with a stamp: to make fast: to confirm: to keep secure: to close the chinks of: to secure against an escape of air or gas by means of a dip-pipe: to accept: to sign with the cross, to baptise or confirm.--adj. SEALED, certified by a seal: inaccessible.--ns. SEAL'-ENGRAV'ING, the art of engraving seals; SEAL'ER, one who seals: an inspector of stamps; SEAL'ING, confirmation by a seal; SEAL'ING-DAY (Shak.), a day for sealing anything; SEAL'ING-WAX, wax for sealing letters, &c.--also SEAL'-WAX; SEAL'-PIPE, a dip-pipe; SEAL'-PRESS, a stamp bearing dies for embossing any device upon paper or lead; SEAL'-RING (Shak.), a signet-ring; SEAL'-WORT, Solomon's seal.--SEAL OF THE FISHERMAN, the papal privy seal impressed on wax, representing St Peter fishing.--GREAT SEAL, the state seal of the United Kingdom; LEADEN SEAL, a disc of lead pierced with two holes through which are passed the ends of a twisted wire; PRIVY SEAL, the seal appended to grants, and in Scotland authenticating royal grants of personal rights; SET ONE'S SEAL TO, to give one's authority or assent to; UNDER SEAL, authenticated. [O. Fr. seel--L. sigillum, dim. of signum, a mark.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  55. s[=e]l, n. the name commonly applied to all the Pinnipedia except the morse or walrus--carnivorous mammals adapted to a marine existence; the two great families are Phocidæ (without external ears) and Otariidæ (having distinct though small external ears): (her.) a bearing representing a creature something like a walrus.--v.t. to hunt seals.--ns. SEAL'-BIRD, the slender-billed shear-water; SEAL'ER, a man or a ship engaged in the seal-fishery; SEAL'ERY, a seal-fishing station: seal-fishery; SEAL'-FLOW'ER, the bleeding heart; SEAL'ING, SEAL'-FISH'ING, the act of catching seals; SEAL'-ROCK'ERY, a place where many seals breed; SEAL'SKIN, the prepared fur of the fur-seal used for women's jackets, a garment made of this.--SEALSKIN CLOTH, a cloth made of mohair with a nap, and dyed to resemble the fur of the seal. [A.S. seolh; Ice. selr, Sw. själ.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  56. Kinds of carnivorous amphibious marine mammal with short limbs modified to serve chiefly for swimming but having fur or hair& beastlike face, feeding on fish& hunted for their oil& skin& the valuable fur of some species (eared s. or otary, kinds distinguished from common s. by having visible external ears, & including the larger kinds, as sea-bear, sea-lion, sea-elephant, & the fur-ss.); s.-fishery; s.-rookery, sealery n., seals breeding-place; sealskin, skin of s., or usu. prepared fur of ss. as material for women\'s jackets &c., jacket of this; (vb) hunt ss. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  57. Piece of wax, lead, or other such material, impressed with device& attached in some way to document usu. in addition to signature as guarantee of authenticity (given under my hand& s., signed& sealed by me; set one\'s s. to, authorize or confirm) or to envelope or to any receptacle such as box or room or house to prevent its being opened without knowledge of owner &c. (leaden s., stamped piece of lead holding ends of a wire used as fastening; under s. of confession, confidence, silence, &c., fig. of communications for which secrecy is stipulated or obligatory), impression stamped on or paper disk stuck to document as symbol equivalent to wax s.; (fig.) significant or prophetic mark (has the s. of death in his face); gem, piece of metal, &c., serving as stamp to produce s. on wax &c. or paper (s.-ring, finger-ring with s.; Great S., s. in charge of Lord Chancellor or Lord Keeper used in sealing Parliament-writs, treaties, & important State papers; privy S.; Fisher\'s S., papal s. with St Peter fishing as device); act done, thing given, event regarded, as confirmation or guarantee of (s. of love, kiss, birth of child, &c.; baptism& the Lord\'s Supper are ss. of God\'s covenant with us); substance used to close aperture &c., esp. water standing in drain-trap to prevent ascent of foul air (s.-pipe, Dip-pipe); s.-wort, Solomon\'s s. (Vb) affix s. to, stamp or fasten with s., certify as correct with s. or stamp or fasten with s., certify as correct with s. or stamp (Sealed Book, one of perfect copies of Book of Common Prayer certified by Great S. under Charles II), show genuineness of (devotion &c.) with one\'s life &c.; close securely or hermetically, stop up or up, (my lips are sealed, I must not speak; sleep sealed his eyes; is a sealed book to me, is something of which I have& can get no knowledge; windows must be sealed up, e.g. by pasting paper along all crevices; s. up tin, solder it so that air has no access; s. pipe &c., provide it with water-s. by means of trap &c.); set significant mark on, set apart, destine, decide irrevocably, (death has sealed her for his own; is sealed to or for salvation, damnation, &c.; his fate is sealed), (of Admiralty officially adopt (design); confine securely (often up); fix (staple &c.) into wall &c. with cement &c.; sealing-wax, mixture of shellac& rosin with turpentine& pigment used for ss. [old French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  58. N. [Anglo Saxon, Icelandic, German] A carnivorous and amphibious mammal inhabiting the sea coasts in all high latitudes, but most abundant in the South Pacific, where the seal fishery is most extensively carried on for the sake of the oil and the skin. Cabinet Dictionary
  59. n. [Anglo Saxon ,German , Latin ] A round or oval piece of metal or stone on which is engraved some image, device, cypher, or motto, used to make an Impression on wax ;—a brass stamp used to Impress wafers in closing letters;—the Impression made by a seal or stamp on wax, wafers, 4tc.;—hand and teal, signature in handwriting and Impression in wax of the writer's seal or signet;— hence, attestation of a deed ; confirmation of a grant or act;-that which confirms or ratifies ; assurance ; —that which makes fast or secures; bond. Cabinet Dictionary

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