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Definitions of tract

  1. a bundle of nerve fibers following a path through the brain Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. a brief treatise on a subject of interest; published in the form of a booklet Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. an extended area of land Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. a system of body parts that together serve some particular purpose Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. a bundle of mylenated nerve fibers following a path through the brain Wordnet Dictionary DB
  6. A written discourse or dissertation, generally of short extent; a short treatise, especially on practical religion. Webster Dictionary DB
  7. Something drawn out or extended; expanse. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. A region or quantity of land or water, of indefinite extent; an area; as, an unexplored tract of sea. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. Traits; features; lineaments. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. The footprint of a wild beast. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. Track; trace. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. Treatment; exposition. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. Continuity or extension of anything; as, the tract of speech. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. Continued or protracted duration; length; extent. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. To trace out; to track; also, to draw out; to protact. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. Verses of Scripture sung at Mass, instead of the Alleluia, from Septuagesima Sunday till the Saturday befor Easter; - so called because sung tractim, or without a break, by one voice, instead of by many as in the antiphons. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. A short pamphlet or leaflet, usually on some moral or religious subject; a large area of land. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  18. An area of greater length than breadth, a path, a track, a way; see tractus and fasciculus. A practical medical dictionary. By Stedman, Thomas Lathrop. Published 1920.
  19. Something drawn out or extended: continued duration: a region: a short treatise. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  20. Region of indefinite extent; short treatise. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  21. An extended area. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  22. A short treatise; pamphlet. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  23. Something drawn out or extended; a region or quantity of land or water of indefinite extent; a short treatise, generally religious; extent; the trace or footing of a wild animal. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  24. A region or area or system considered as a whole, as the alimentary tract. A dictionary of scientific terms. By Henderson, I. F.; Henderson, W. D. Published 1920.
  25. [Latin] A region or area or system considered as a whole, as the alimentary tract (anat.). na
  26. Verses of Scripture sung at Mass, instead of the Alleluia, from Septuagesima Sunday till the Saturday befor Easter; -- so called because sung tractim, or without a break, by one voice, instead of by many as in the antiphons. mso.anu.edu.au
  27. Verses of Scripture sung at Mass, instead of the Alleluia, from Septuagesima Sunday till the Saturday befor Easter; so called because sung tractim, or without a break, by one voice, instead of by many as in the antiphons. dictgcide_fs
  28. trakt, n. something drawn out or extended: continued duration: a region, area: a short treatise: an anthem sung instead of the Alleluia after the gradual, or instead of it, from Septuagesima till Easter-eve.--n. TRACTABIL'ITY, quality or state of being tractable: docility.--adj. TRAC'TABLE, easily drawn, managed, or taught: docile.--n. TRAC'TABLENESS.--adv. TRAC'TABLY.--n. TRAC'TATE, a treatise, tract.--adj. TRAC'TILE, that may be drawn out.--ns. TRACTIL'ITY, the quality of being tractile: ductility; TRAC'TION, act of drawing or state of being drawn; TRAC'TION-EN'GINE, a steam vehicle for hauling heavy weights along a road, &c.--adj. TRAC'TIVE, that draws or pulls.--ns. TRAC'TOR, that which draws, esp. in pl. metallic tractors, two bars of iron and of steel, drawn over diseased parts of the body to give supposed relief; TRACTOR[=A]'TION, the use of metallic tractors in medicine. [L. tractus, pa.p. of trah[)e]re, to draw.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  29. [Latin] A region, especially in the nervous system; a collection of parts of determinate outline and course; as Optic t. (Tractus opticus), Cerebellar t. of the cord. na
  30. Region, area, of indefinite (usu. large) extent, as a t. of sand, pathless tt.; (Anat.) area of organ or system, as olfactory, optic, respiratory, t.; (archaic) period (of time &c.). [Latin] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  31. Short treatise or discourse esp. on religious subject; (R.-C. Ch. &c.) a form of anthem; Tt. for the Times, Oxford Tt., see TRACTARIANISM. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  32. See Golls column. American pocket medical dictionary.
  33. A region, especially one of some length, principally in the nervous system. American pocket medical dictionary.
  34. An extent of surface greater in length than in breadth. Appleton's medical dictionary.
  35. n. [Latin] Something drawn out or extended:-a region or quantity of land or water of indefinite extent;-a written discourse or dissertation, generally not of great length; especially, a short treatise on practical religion;-continued or protracted duration; length; extent. Cabinet Dictionary

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