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Definitions of wheedle

  1. To flatter; to coax. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  2. To persuade by flattery; coax; deceive. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  3. To grain, or get away, by flattery. Webster Dictionary DB
  4. To flatter; cajole; coax; as, she wheedled her father into consenting; to get by coaxing or flattery. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  5. To entice by soft words: to flatter. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  6. To entice by soft words; cajole; coax. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  7. To coax with flattery. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  8. influence or urge by gentle urging, caressing, or flattering; "He palavered her into going along" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. WHEEDLER, WHEEDLING. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  10. To entice by soft words; to flatter; to cajole; to obtain by flattery. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  11. To persuade by coaxing or flattery; to entice by soft words. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  12. Wheedler. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  13. Wheedling. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.

What are the misspellings for wheedle?

Usage examples for wheedle

  1. Her Grace was in the shop the matter of a full hour and a half, trying to wheedle me out of a sight of this rare piece; and I, pretending not to know what her Grace would be after, but showing her thing after thing, to put it out of her head. – Marriage by Susan Edmonstone Ferrier
  2. I'll do exactly as you say about everything if you will help me wheedle Aunt Ollie into letting me have the money." – A Daughter of the Land by Gene Stratton-Porter
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