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Definitions of whim

  1. a sudden desire; "he bought it on impulse" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. a whimsical idea; "the theatrical notion of disguise is associated with disaster in his stories" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. an odd or fanciful or capricious idea; "the theatrical notion of disguise is associated with disaster in his stories"; "he had a whimsy about flying to the moon"; "whimsy can be humorous to someone with time to enjoy it" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  4. a sudden desire; "he bought it on an impulse" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  5. The European widgeon. Webster Dictionary DB
  6. A sudden turn or start of the mind; a temporary eccentricity; a freak; a fancy; a capricious notion; a humor; a caprice. Webster Dictionary DB
  7. To be subject to, or indulge in, whims; to be whimsical, giddy, or freakish. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. A large capstan or vertical drum turned by horse power or steam power, for raising ore or water, etc., from mines, or for other purposes; - called also whim gin, and whimsey. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. A fancy; freak; notion; a sudden, often unreasonable, wish. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  10. A caprice: a fancy. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  11. A freak; fancy; caprice. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  12. A caprice; freak. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  13. A sudden turn or start of the mind; a capricious notion; freak; caprice; a large capstan worked by horses, for raising ore, water, &c., from the bottom of mines. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  14. A capricious fancy or conceit; a freakish humour. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  15. A drum or capstan worked by horses for winding ore or coals out of a mine. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  16. A large capstan or vertical drum turned by horse power or steam power, for raising ore or water, etc., from mines, or for other purposes; -- called also whim gin, and whimsey. mso.anu.edu.au
  17. A large capstan or vertical drum turned by horse power or steam power, for raising ore or water, etc., from mines, or for other purposes; called also whim gin, and whimsey. dictgcide_fs
  18. hwim, n. a caprice: a fancy: a machine for raising ore, a mine.--v.i. to turn round, to be seized with a whim.--v.t. to cause to turn.--adjs. WHIM'MY, WHIM'SICAL, full of whims, odd, fantastical.--ns. WHIMSICAL'ITY, WHIM'SICALNESS.--adv. WHIM'SICALLY.--ns. WHIM'SY, WHIM'SEY, a whim, freak.--adj. full of whims, changeable.--n. WHIM'-WHAM, a ridiculous notion or thing, a freak, an odd device. [Ice. hvima, to have the eyes wandering.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  19. Sudden fancy, caprice, crotchet; kind of windlass for raising ore from mine; whimwham archaic, plaything, toy, w. [old Norse] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  20. (Mech.) A large capstan or windlass worked by horse or steam power, for raising ore, etc. , from mines. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy

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