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Definitions of whim

  1. To be subject to, or indulge in, whims; to be whimsical, giddy, or freakish. Webster Dictionary DB
  2. a whimsical idea; "the theatrical notion of disguise is associated with disaster in his stories" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. A sudden turn or start of the mind; a temporary eccentricity; a freak; a fancy; a capricious notion; a humor; a caprice. Webster Dictionary DB
  4. A large capstan or vertical drum turned by horse power or steam power, for raising ore or water, etc., from mines, or for other purposes; - called also whim gin, and whimsey. Webster Dictionary DB
  5. A caprice: a fancy. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  6. A freak; fancy; caprice. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  7. A caprice; freak. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  8. A sudden turn or start of the mind; a capricious notion; freak; caprice; a large capstan worked by horses, for raising ore, water, &c., from the bottom of mines. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  9. A capricious fancy or conceit; a freakish humour. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  10. A drum or capstan worked by horses for winding ore or coals out of a mine. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.

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Usage examples for whim

  1. Is Joan to die, then, to please your whim – A Son of the Immortals by Louis Tracy
  2. I don't want to, she repeated, without any explanation of her whim – Carnival by Compton Mackenzie
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