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Definitions of institute

  1. avance or set forth in court; "bring charges", "institute proceedings" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. set up or lay the groundwork for; "establish a new department" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. an association organized to promote art or science or education Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. Established; organized; founded. Webster Dictionary DB
  5. To set up; to establish; to ordain; as, to institute laws, rules, etc. Webster Dictionary DB
  6. To originate and establish; to found; to organize; as, to institute a court, or a society. Webster Dictionary DB
  7. To nominate; to appoint. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. To begin; to commence; to set on foot; as, to institute an inquiry; to institute a suit. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. To ground or establish in principles and rudiments; to educate; to instruct. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. To invest with the spiritual charge of a benefice, or the care of souls. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. The act of instituting; institution. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. That which is instituted, established, or fixed, as a law, habit, or custom. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. Hence: An elementary and necessary principle; a precept, maxim, or rule, recognized as established and authoritative; usually in the plural, a collection of such principles and precepts; esp., a comprehensive summary of legal principles and decisions; as, the Institutes of Justinian; Coke's Institutes of the Laws of England. Cf. Digest, n. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. An institution; a society established for the promotion of learning, art, science, etc.; a college; as, the Institute of Technology; also, a building owned or occupied by such an institute; as, the Cooper Institute. Newage Dictionary DB
  15. The person to whom an estate is first given by destination or limitation. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. An institution; a society established for the promotion of learning, art, science, etc.; a college; as, the of Technology; also, a building owned or occupied by such an institute; as, the Cooper Institute. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. To establish; set up; fix; originate; set in operation; as, to institute a new custom. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  18. Established law; a maxim or principle; scientific or literary society; a building for the work of advancing science, etc. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  19. 1. An association of persons for a definite purpose, especially for the performance of literary or scientific work or teaching. 2. An institution. A practical medical dictionary. By Stedman, Thomas Lathrop. Published 1920.
  20. To set up in: to erect: to originate: to establish: to appoint: to commence: to educate. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  21. Anything instituted or formally established: established law: precept or principle: a book of precepts or principles: an institution: a literary and philosophical society. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  22. Established law; a literary establishment. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  23. To originate; establish. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  24. To establish; set in operation; originate. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  25. An institution, as of learning. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  26. Fundamental principles. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  27. Anything instituted; established law; settled order; precept or principle; a society established for some scientific or literary object; a book of principles, especially in jurisprudence or medicine. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  28. To set up in; to establish; to ordain; to found; to originate; to educate; to commence; to invest with the spiritual part of a benefice. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  29. To commence or set in operation; to found or originate; to establish; to invest with the spiritual part of a benefice. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  30. Established law; settled order; a literary or philosophical society. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  31. A book of elements or principles; a commentary. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  32. in'sti-t[=u]t, v.t. to set up in: to erect: to originate: to establish: to appoint: to commence: to educate.--n. anything instituted or formally established: established law: precept or principle: (pl.) a book of precepts, principles, or rules, esp. in jurisprudence: an institution: a literary and philosophical society or association, as the 'Institute of France' (embracing L'Académie Française, L'Académie des Inscriptions et Belles-Lettres, L'Académie des Sciences, L'Académie des Beaux Arts, and L'Académie des Sciences Morales et Politiques).--n. INSTIT[=U]'TION, the act of instituting or establishing: that which is instituted or established: foundation: established order: enactment: a society established for some object: that which institutes or instructs: a system of principles or rules: the origination of the Eucharist and the formula of institution: the act by which a bishop commits a cure of souls to a priest.--adjs. INSTIT[=U]'TIONAL, INSTIT[=U]'TIONARY, belonging to an institution: instituted by authority: elementary.--n. IN'STITUTIST, a writer of institutes or elementary rules.--adj. IN'STITUTIVE, able or tending to establish: depending on an institution.--n. IN'STITUTOR, one who institutes: an instructor. [L. institu[)e]re, -[=u]tum--in, in, statu[)e]re, to cause to stand--st[=a]re, to stand.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  33. Society, organization, for promotion of scientific or other object; building used by this; (pl.) digest of elements of a subject, esp. of jurisprudence, as li. of Justinian. [Latin] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  34. Establish, found; set on foot (inquiry &c.); appoint (person to, into, benefice). [Latin] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  35. [L.] (Scot. Law.) A person to whom an estate is first given by destination or limitation. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  36. n. Any thing instituted ; established law; settled order,—precept; maxim; principle; —an institution ; a literary or philosophical society; pl. A book of elements or principles ; a treatise ; a commentary—applied to certain standard works in theology, medicine, and jurisprudence. Cabinet Dictionary
  37. Established law, settled order; precept, maxim, principle. Complete Dictionary

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