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Definitions of lecture

  1. censure severely or angrily; "The mother scolded the child for entering a stranger's car"; "The deputy ragged the Prime Minister"; "The customer dressed down the waiter for bringing cold soup"; "check" is archaic Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. deliver a lecture or talk; "She will talk at Rutgers next week"; "Did you ever lecture at Harvard?" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. teaching by giving a discourse on some subject (typically to a class) Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. a lengthy rebuke; "a good lecture was my father's idea of discipline"; "the teacher gave him a talking to" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. a speech that is open to the public; "he attended a lecture on telecommunications" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. The act of reading; as, the lecture of Holy Scripture. Webster Dictionary DB
  7. A discourse on any subject; especially, a formal or methodical discourse, intended for instruction; sometimes, a familiar discourse, in contrast with a sermon. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. A reprimand or formal reproof from one having authority. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. A rehearsal of a lesson. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. To read or deliver a lecture to. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. To reprove formally and with authority. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. To deliver a lecture or lectures. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. A formal talk on any subject; a lengthy reproof. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  14. To deliver a formal talk. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  15. To rebuke formally. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  16. Lecturer. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  17. A discourse on any subject: a formal reproof. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  18. To instruct by discourses: to instruct authoritatively: to reprove. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  19. To give a lecture or lectures. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  20. A discourse; reading; formal reproof. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  21. To deliver a lecture to: reprove. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  22. To deliver a lecture. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  23. To deliver lectures to; reprimand; deliver a formal discourse. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  24. A discourse; formal reproof. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  25. A discourse of a methodical nature on any subject; a reading with a tutor; an exposition; a reprimand; a formal reproof. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  26. To instruct by discourses; to reprimand; to teach by instruction and reproof. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  27. A discourse read on any subject; a formal discourse intended to instruct; a formal reproof; pedantic discourse. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  28. To instruct formally or dogmatically; to instruct by formal discourse or explanation, as an audience or a class of students; to reprove. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  29. Subject matter expert's formal presentation and a question-and-answer session that typically follows. thelawdictionary.org
  30. lek't[=u]r, n. a discourse on any subject, esp. a professional or tutorial discourse: an expository and discursive religious discourse, usually based on an extended passage of Scripture rather than a single text: an endowed lectureship, as the Bampton, Hulsean, &c.: a formal reproof.--v.t. to instruct by discourses: to instruct authoritatively: to reprove.--v.i. to give a lecture or lectures.--ns. LEC'TURER, one who lectures: one of a class of preachers in the Church of England, chosen by the vestry and supported by voluntary contributions; LEC'TURESHIP, the office of a lecturer. [See LECTION.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  31. Discourse before audience or class on given subject, usu. by way of instruction; admonition, reproof, (read one a l., reprove him). (Vb) deliver l. or ll. (on subject); instruct or entertain (class &c.) by l.; admonish, reprimand; hence lecturer n. [Latin] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  32. n. [Latin] A discourse on any subject; especially, a formal or methodical discourse intended for instruction;— a magisterial reprimand; a formal reproof. Cabinet Dictionary

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