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Definitions of loan

  1. a word borrowed from another language; e.g. `blitz' is a German word borrowed into modern English Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. the provision of money temporarily (usually at interest) Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. the temporary provision of money (usually at interest) Wordnet Dictionary DB
  4. give temporarily; let have for a limited time; "I will lend you my car"; "loan me some money" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  5. A loanin. Webster Dictionary DB
  6. The act of lending; a lending; permission to use; as, the loan of a book, money, services. Webster Dictionary DB
  7. That which one lends or borrows, esp. a sum of money lent at interest; as, he repaid the loan. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. To lend; - sometimes with out. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. A sum of money lent for a period; something granted for temporary use. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  10. To lend. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  11. Anything lent: the act of lending: permission to use: money lent for interest. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  12. Act of lending; anything, lent. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  13. Something lent; act of lending. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  14. The act of lending; state of being lent; anything lent, specially money on interest; permission to use; grant of the use. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  15. Anything given for temporary use; sum of money lent for a time at interest; grant of the use. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  16. To grant the use of for a time; to lend. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  17. A lane; a quiet, shady, winding path. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  18. A bailment without reward ; consisting of the delivery of an article by the owner to another person, to be used by the latter gratuitously, and returned either in specie or in kind. A sum of money confided to another. Ramsey v. Whitbeck. 81 III. App. 210; Xylitols v. Pearson, 7 Pet. 109, S L. Ed. 023; Rodman v. Munson, 13 I’ ah. (X. Y.) 75; Booth v. Terrell. 10 Ga. 25; Payne v. Gardiner, 29 N. Y. 107. A loan of money is a contract by which one delivers a sum of money to another, and the latter agrees to return at a future time a sum equivalent to that which he borrowed. Civ. Code Cal. thelawdictionary.org
  19. The law strictly forbade any interest to be taken for a loan to any poor person, and at first, as it seems, even in the case of a foreigner; but this prohibition was afterward limited to Hebrews only, from whom, of whatever rank, not only was no usury on any pretence to be exacted, but relief to the poor by way of loan was enjoined, and excuses for evading this duty were forbidden. ( Exodus 22:25 ; Leviticus 25:35 Leviticus 25:37 ) As commerce increased, the practice of usury, and so also of suretyship, grew up; but the exaction of it from a Hebrew appears to have been regarded to a late period as discreditable. ( Psalms 15:5 ; Proverbs 6:1 Proverbs 6:4 ; 11:15 ; 17:18 ; 20:16 ; 22:26 ; Jeremiah 15:10 ; Ezekiel 18:13 ) Systematic breach of the law in this respect was corrected by Nehemiah after the return from captivity. ( Nehemiah 5:1 Nehemiah 5:13 ) The money-changers, who had seats and tables in the temple, where traders whose profits arose chiefly from the exchange of money with those who came to pay their annual half-shekel. The Jewish law did not forbid temporary bondage in the case of debtors, but it forbade a Hebrew debtor to be detained as a bondman longer than the seventh year, or at farthest the year of jubilee. ( Exodus 21:2 ; Leviticus 25:39 Leviticus 25:42 ; 15:9 ) [E] indicates this entry was also found in Easton's Bible Dictionary biblestudytools.com
  20. To lend; -- sometimes with out. mso.anu.edu.au
  21. The Mosaic law required that when an Israelite needed to borrow, what he asked was to be freely lent to him, and no interest was to be charged, although interest might be taken of a foreigner ( Exodus 22:25 ; Deuteronomy 23:19 Deuteronomy 23:20 ; Leviticus 25:35-38 ). At the end of seven years all debts were remitted. Of a foreigner the loan might, however, be exacted. At a later period of the Hebrew commonwealth, when commerce increased, the practice of exacting usury or interest on loans, and of suretiship in the commercial sense, grew up. Yet the exaction of it from a Hebrew was regarded as discreditable ( Psalms 15:5 ; Proverbs 6:1 Proverbs 6:4 ; 11:15 ; 17:18 ; 20:16 ; 27:13 ; Jeremiah 15:10 ). Limitations are prescribed by the law to the taking of a pledge from the borrower. The outer garment in which a man slept at night, if taken in pledge, was to be returned before sunset ( Exodus 22:26 Exodus 22:27 ; Deuteronomy 24:12 Deuteronomy 24:13 ). A widow's garment ( Deuteronomy 24:17 ) and a millstone (6) could not be taken. A creditor could not enter the house to reclaim a pledge, but must remain outside till the borrower brought it (10,11). The Hebrew debtor could not be retained in bondage longer than the seventh year, or at farthest the year of jubilee ( Exodus 21:2 ; Leviticus 25:39 Leviticus 25:42 ), but foreign sojourners were to be "bondmen for ever" ( Leviticus 25:44-54 ). biblestudytools.com
  22. That which one lends or borrows, especially a sum of money lent at interest; as, he repaid the loan. dictgcide_fs
  23. To lend; sometimes with out. dictgcide_fs
  24. l[=o]n, n. a lane: an open space for passage left between fields of corn: a place for milking cows.--Also LOAN'ING. [Lane.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  25. l[=o]n, n. anything lent: the act of lending: permission to use: money lent for interest.--v.t. to lend.--adj. LOAN'ABLE.--ns. LOAN'-OFF'ICE, a public office at which loans are negotiated, a pawnbroker's shop; LOAN'-SOC[=I]'ETY, a society organised to lend money to be repaid with interest by instalments; LOAN'-WORD, one taken into one language from another--like Loafer above. [A.S. l['æ]n; Ice. lán, Dan. laan, cf. Ger. lehen, a fief.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  26. Thing, esp. sum of money, lent to be returned with or without interest; word, custom, &c., adopted by one people from another (so l.-god, -myth, -word); lending or being lent (on l.; may I have the l. of-?, may I borrow it?); money contribution from individuals or public bodies to State expenses acknowledged as debt; arrangement or contract by which a government receives advances of money usu. for stipulated interest; l.-collection, of pictures &c. lent by owners for exhibition; l.-holder, person holding debentures or other acknowledgments of l., mortgagee; l.-office, for lending money to private borrowers, also for receiving subscriptions to government l.; l.-society, of periodical subscribers to fund from which members may have ll.; (vb, now chiefly United States) grant l. of, whence loanable a., loanee, loaner nn. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  27. n. [Anglo-Saxon] Act of lending that which is lent; any thing lent on condition that the specific thing shall be returned, or its equivalent in kind;— a permission to use; grant of the use. Cabinet Dictionary
  28. n. [Scot.] A narrow inclosed way, usually between hedges;— hence, a lane also loaning. Cabinet Dictionary

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