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Definitions of wither

  1. lose freshness, vigor, or vitality; "Her bloom was fading" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. wither, esp. with a loss of moisture; "The fruit dried and shriveled" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. wither, especially with a loss of moisture; "The fruit dried and shriveled" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  4. To fade; to lose freshness; to become sapless; to become sapless; to dry or shrivel up. Webster Dictionary DB
  5. To lose vigor or power; to languish; to pass away. Webster Dictionary DB
  6. To cause to fade, and become dry. Webster Dictionary DB
  7. To cause to shrink, wrinkle, or decay, for want of animal moisture. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. To cause to languish, perish, or pass away; to blight; as, a reputation withered by calumny. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. To lose or want animal moisture; to waste; to pin away, as animal bodies. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. To cause to fade and become dry; to cause to shrivel or wrinkle. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  11. To fade or shrivel. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  12. To fade or become dry in the weather; to lose freshness: to shrink: waste. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  13. To cause to dry up: to cause to decay, waste. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  14. To cause to wither. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  15. To lose freshness; shrink: decay. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  16. To cause to become limp or dry, as a plant. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  17. To waste, as flesh. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  18. To droop or perish. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  19. To cause to fade and become dry; to cause to shrink, wrinkle, and decay from want of animal moisture; to blight. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  20. To fade; to lose its native freshness; to become sapless; to lose moisture; to waste; to pine away. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  21. To fade; to lose its native freshness; to make to fade; to become sapless; to shrink; to pine away. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  22. To lose or want animal moisture; to waste; to pin dictgcide_fs
  23. with'[.e]r, v.i. to fade or become dry: to lose freshness: to shrink: waste.--v.t. to cause to dry up: to cause to decay, perish, waste.--adj. WITH'ERED, dried up.--n. WITH'EREDNESS.--adj. WITH'ERING, blasting, blighting, scorching.--n. WITH'ERING-FLOOR, the drying-floor of a malt-house.--adv. WITH'ERINGLY. [A.S. wedrian, to expose to weather.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  24. Make or become dry& shrivelled (often up), deprive of or lose vigour or vitality or freshness or importance (often away), decline, languish, decay, (has a withered arm; flowers& beauty w.; age cannot w. her; the individual withers, ceases to be important); blight with scorn &c. (w. one with a look usu. joc.), whence withering a., witheringly adv. [Middle English] Concise Oxford Dictionary

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