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Definitions of dig

  1. get the meaning of something; "Do you comprehend the meaning of this letter?" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. an aggressive remark directed at a person like a missile and intended to have a telling effect; "his parting shot was `drop dead'"; "she threw shafts of sarcasm"; "she takes a dig at me every chance she gets" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. turn up, loosen, or remove earth; "Dig we must"; "turn over the soil for aeration" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. work hard; "She was digging away at her math homework"; "Lexicographers drudge all day long" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. the act of touching someone suddenly with your finger or elbow; "she gave me a sharp dig in the ribs" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. the act of digging; "there's an interesting excavation going on near Princeton" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. the site of an archeological exploration; "they set up camp next to the dig" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. poke or thrust abruptly; "he jabbed his finger into her ribs" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. remove the inner part or the core of; "the mining company wants to excavate the hillsite" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. create by digging, of cavities; "dig a hole" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. a small gouge (as in the cover of a book); "the book was in good condition except for a dig in the back cover" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  12. create by digging; "dig a hole"; "dig out a channel" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  13. To turn up, or delve in, (earth) with a spade or a hoe; to open, loosen, or break up (the soil) with a spade, or other sharp instrument; to pierce, open, or loosen, as if with a spade. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. To get by digging; as, to dig potatoes, or gold. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. To hollow out, as a well; to form, as a ditch, by removing earth; to excavate; as, to dig a ditch or a well. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. To thrust; to poke. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. To work with a spade or other like implement; to do servile work; to delve. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. To take ore from its bed, in distinction from making excavations in search of ore. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. A thrust; a punch; a poke; as, a dig in the side or the ribs. See Dig, v. t., 4. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. A plodding and laborious student. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. To work hard or drudge; Webster Dictionary DB
  22. To study ploddingly and laboriously. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. Of a tool: To cut deeply into the work because ill set, held at a wrong angle, or the like, as when a lathe tool is set too low and so sprung into the work. Webster Dictionary DB
  24. A tool for digging. Webster Dictionary DB
  25. An act of digging. Webster Dictionary DB
  26. An amount to be dug. Webster Dictionary DB
  27. Gouge. Webster Dictionary DB
  28. To work with a spade; cast up earth; colloquially, to study hard. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  29. To loosen or break up (ground) with a spade; to bring up from under ground; as, to dig potatoes; thrust or force in: with into. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  30. A poke or thrust. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  31. Dug, or digged. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  32. Digging. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  33. To turn up the earth: to cultivate with a spade:-pr.p. digging; pa.t. and pa.p. dug, (B.) digged. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  34. DIGGER. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  35. Dug. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  36. To turn up the earth; burrow into. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  37. To break up, or throw up or out, as earth with a spade; excavate. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  38. To push or force in, as a spade into the ground. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  39. To work, as with a spade; toil; plod. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  40. To break and turn up the earth with a spade, &c; to hollow out by digging; to thrust in; to obtain by digging. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  41. To work with a spade or a similar piercing instrument; to do servile work; to work in search of. To dig down, to undermine and cause to fall by digging. To dig out, cr to dig from, to obtain by digging. To dig through, to open a passage through. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  42. To work like a digger; to study ploddingly and laboriously. Webster Dictionary DB
  43. To open or turn up the earth with a spade; to excavate; to work with a spade; to search. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  44. A thrust; a poke. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  45. To like; enjoy; admire. dictgcide_fs
  46. To understand; as, do you dig me?. dictgcide_fs
  47. To notice; to look at; as, dig that crazy hat!. dictgcide_fs
  48. To appreciate and enjoy; as, he digs classical music as well as rock. dictgcide_fs
  49. same as Gouge. dictgcide_fs
  50. a critical and sometimes sarcastic or insulting remark, but often good-humored; as, celebrities at a roast must suffer through countless digs. dictgcide_fs
  51. An archeological excavation site. dictgcide_fs
  52. dig, v.t. to excavate: to turn up the earth: to cultivate with a spade: to poke or thrust, as one's elbow into another's side, or spurs into a horse.--v.i. to till the ground; to occupy one's self in digging; (U.S. slang) to study hard:--pr.p. dig'ging; pa.t. and pa.p. dug, (B.) digged.--n. a thrust, a poke: (U.S. slang) a hard student.--adj. DIG'GABLE, that may be dug.--n. DIG'GER, a person or animal that digs: a machine for digging, as a steam-digger.--n.pl. DIG'GINGS, places where mining is carried on, esp. for gold: (slang, orig. American) lodgings, rooms.--DIG IN, to cover over by digging: to work hard; DIG OUT (U.S. slang), to decamp.--DIGGER INDIANS, degraded Indian tribes of California and Nevada, who live by digging roots. [Prob. O. Fr. diguer, to dig; of Teut. origin.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  53. (dug, formerly also digged), & n. Use spade or mattock, claws, hands, or snout, in excavating or turning over ground; make research (for information, into author &c.); make way by digging into, through, under; excavate or turn up (ground) with spade &c.; make (hole &c.) by digging; get by digging (potatoes); thrust (spurs, one\'s nails, feet, point of weapon) into something or in; poke (person in the ribs); d. out, get, find, make, by digging; d. up, break up (fallow land). (N.) piece of digging; thrust, poke, (esp. in the ribs; also fig. d. at, remark directed against). [French] Concise Oxford Dictionary

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