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Definitions of bore

  1. a high wave (often dangerous) caused by tidal flow (as by colliding tidal currents or in a narrow estuary) Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. completely unclothed; "bare bodies"; "naked from the waste up"; "a nude model" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. cause to be bored Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. (mining terms) a hole or passage made by a drill; usually made for exploratory purposes Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. diameter of a tube or gun barrel Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. a person who evokes boredom Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. drill a hole into Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. a hole or passage made by a drill; usually made for exploratory purposes Wordnet Dictionary DB
  9. make a hole with a pointed power or hand tool; "don't drill here, there's a gas pipe"; "drill a hole into the wall"; "drill for oil" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  10. To perforate or penetrate, as a solid body, by turning an auger, gimlet, drill, or other instrument; to make a round hole in or through; to pierce; as, to bore a plank. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. To form or enlarge by means of a boring instrument or apparatus; as, to bore a steam cylinder or a gun barrel; to bore a hole. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. To make (a passage) by laborious effort, as in boring; as, to bore one's way through a crowd; to force a narrow and difficult passage through. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. To weary by tedious iteration or by dullness; to tire; to trouble; to vex; to annoy; to pester. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. To befool; to trick. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. To make a hole or perforation with, or as with, a boring instrument; to cut a circular hole by the rotary motion of a tool; as, to bore for water or oil (i. e., to sink a well by boring for water or oil); to bore with a gimlet; to bore into a tree (as insects). Webster Dictionary DB
  16. To be pierced or penetrated by an instrument that cuts as it turns; as, this timber does not bore well, or is hard to bore. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. To push forward in a certain direction with laborious effort. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. A hole made by boring; a perforation. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. The internal cylindrical cavity of a gun, cannon, pistol, or other firearm, or of a pipe or tube. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. The size of a hole; the interior diameter of a tube or gun barrel; the caliber. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. A tool for making a hole by boring, as an auger. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. Caliber; importance. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. A person or thing that wearies by prolixity or dullness; a tiresome person or affair; any person or thing which causes ennui. Webster Dictionary DB
  24. A tidal flood which regularly or occasionally rushes into certain rivers of peculiar configuration or location, in one or more waves which present a very abrupt front of considerable height, dangerous to shipping, as at the mouth of the Amazon, in South America, the Hoogly and Indus, in India, and the Tsien-tang, in China. Webster Dictionary DB
  25. Less properly, a very high and rapid tidal flow, when not so abrupt, such as occurs at the Bay of Fundy and in the British Channel. Webster Dictionary DB
  26. imp. of 1st & 2d Bear. Newage Dictionary DB
  27. To shoot out the nose or toss it in the air; - said of a horse. Webster Dictionary DB
  28. imp. of 1st & 2d Bear. Webster Dictionary DB
  29. To pierce of drill a hole in; to form by piercing or drilling; to force with effort; to weary by tiresome repetition, or by dulness; to annoy. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  30. To make a hole; pierce; to push forward toward a certain point. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  31. A hole made by piercing or drilling; hence, the cavity or hollow of a gun; the inside diameter of a gun; hole; a stupid, uninteresting person; any person or thing that causes dull weariness. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  32. Of bear. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  33. To pierce so as to form a hole: to weary or annoy. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  34. A hole made by boring: the size of the cavity of a gun: a person or thing that wearies. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  35. Did bear, pa.t. of BEAR. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  36. A tidal flood which rushes with great force into the mouths of certain rivers. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  37. A hole made by boring; a wearisome person. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  38. To make a hole in; to weary. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  39. Imp. Of BEAR, v. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  40. To make a hole in; pierce; perforate; tire; weary; annoy. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  41. A hole made by boring; the interior diameter, as of a firearm. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  42. A tiresome person; an annoyance. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  43. The hole made by boring: the cavity or calibre of a gun; an instrument used for boring; a person or thing that bores. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  44. A sudden indux in certain estuaries of a tidal wave often of great volume, and rushing up with great violence and a loud noise. See Bear. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  45. To pierce or drill a hole in; to weary with repetition of what does not interest. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  46. To be pierced; to pierce by boring; to push forward toward a certain point; to carry the nose near the ground, as a horse. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  47. To make a hole in a hard body with some tool; to perforate; to pierce; to annoy by repeated applications. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  48. The hole made by piercing or boring with a tool; the cavity or hollow in anything, as in a gun-barrel; a person or thing that annoys. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  49. The advancing front of the tidal wave as it ascends certain rivers or estuaries, especially at a spring tide. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  50. To shoot out the nose or toss it in the air; -- said of a horse. mso.anu.edu.au
  51. To shoot out the nose or toss it in the air; said of a horse. dictgcide_fs
  52. b[=o]r, v.t. to pierce so as to form a hole; to weary or annoy.--n. a hole made by boring: the size of the cavity of a gun; a person or thing that wearies (not from the foregoing, according to Dr Murray, who says both verb and noun arose after 1750).--ns. BOR'ER, the person or thing that bores: a genus of sea-worms that pierce wood; a name common to many insects that pierce wood; BOR'ING, the act of making a hole in anything: a hole made by boring: (pl.) the chips produced by boring. [A.S. borian, to bore; cf. Ger. bohren; allied to L. for-[=a]re, to bore, Gr. pharynx, the gullet.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  53. b[=o]r, did bear, pa.t. of BEAR. gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  54. b[=o]r, n. a tidal flood which rushes with great violence up the estuaries of certain rivers, also called Eagre. [Ice. bára, a wave or swell.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  55. Make hole in usu. with revolving tool, hollow out evenly (tube &c.), whence boring (2) n.; make (a hole, one\'s way) by boring, persistent pushing, or excavation; (of horse) thrust the head out; (Racing) push (another) out of the course. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  56. Hollow of gun-barrel; diameter of this, calibre; small deep hole made in earth to find water &c. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  57. Nuisance (usu. as pred.); tiresome person, twaddler. [French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  58. Weary by tedious talk or dullness. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  59. Great tide-wave with precipitous front moving up some estuaries. [old Norse] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  60. See bear Concise Oxford Dictionary
  61. [Ger.] (Naut.) A tidal wave of great height, confined to certain rivers and inlets of the sea, e.g. Severn. It comes suddenly with a peculiar roar, and returns as suddenly. In the Petticodiac, Bay of Fundy, it is seventy-two feet high. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  62. n. The hole made by boring; the cavity or hollow of any firearm;—one who, or that which, wearies by repetition or dulness. Cabinet Dictionary
  63. n. [Old Hebrew, German] A tidal flood of great height and forced formed at the mouths of some rivers;—a sudden influx of the tide. Cabinet Dictionary
  64. The hole made by boring; the instrument with which a hole is bored; the size of any hole. Complete Dictionary
  65. The preterite of Bear. Complete Dictionary

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