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Definitions of dread

  1. fearful expectation or anticipation; "the student looked around the examination room with apprehension" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. causing fear or dread or terror; "the awful war"; "an awful risk"; "dire news"; "a career or vengeance so direful that London was shocked"; "the dread presence of the headmaster"; "polio is no longer the dreaded disease it once was"; "a dreadful storm"; "a fearful howling"; "horrendous explosions shook the city"; "a terrible curse" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  3. be afraid or scared of; be frightened of; "I fear the winters in Moscow"; "We should not fear the Communists!" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. To fear in a great degree; to regard, or look forward to, with terrific apprehension. Webster Dictionary DB
  5. To be in dread, or great fear. Webster Dictionary DB
  6. Great fear in view of impending evil; fearful apprehension of danger; anticipatory terror. Webster Dictionary DB
  7. Reverential or respectful fear; awe. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. An object of terrified apprehension. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. A person highly revered. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. Fury; dreadfulness. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. Doubt; as, out of dread. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. Exciting great fear or apprehension; causing terror; frightful; dreadful. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. Inspiring with reverential fear; awful' venerable; as, dread sovereign; dread majesty; dread tribunal. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. To fear greatly; to look forward to with fear. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  15. To be in great fear. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  16. Fear mingled with respect and affection. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  17. Awful; solemn. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  18. To fear greatly, to apprehend. 2. An extreme fear or apprehension. A practical medical dictionary. By Stedman, Thomas Lathrop. Published 1920.
  19. Fear: awe: the objects that excite fear. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  20. Exciting great fear or awe. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  21. (Pr. Bk.) To fear with reverence: to regard with terror. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  22. Great fear; awe. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  23. Inspiring fear. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  24. To fear greatly. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  25. To anticipate fearfully. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  26. Causing great fear; terrible. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  27. Exciting awe or reverence. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  28. Shrinking horror; terrifying anticipation. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  29. Fear with respect; awe. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  30. That which causes awe or fear. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  31. Exciting great fear; terrible; inspiring awe. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  32. Great fear in the apprehension of evil or danger; terror; awe; the cause of fear; the person or thing dreaded. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  33. To fear in a great degree; to fear with awe. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  34. Great fear; apprehension of evil or danger; fear united with awe; the person or thing feared. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  35. Exciting fear; venerable in a very high degree; awful; terrible. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  36. To fear greatly; to be in great fear. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  37. dred, n. fear: awe: the objects that excite fear.--adj. dreaded: inspiring great fear or awe.--v.t. to regard with terror: to regard with reverence.--adjs. DREAD'ABLE; DREAD'FUL, (orig.) full of dread: producing great fear or awe: terrible.--adv. DREAD'FULLY.--n. DREAD'FULNESS.--adj. DREAD'LESS, free from dread: intrepid.--adv. DREAD'LESSLY.--n. DREAD'LESSNESS.--adj. DREAD'LY (Spens.) dreadful.--ns. DREAD'NAUGHT, DREAD'NOUGHT, one who dreads nothing--hence, a garment of thick cloth defending against the weather: the cloth of which it is made.--PENNY DREADFUL, a cheap sensational serial or tale, usually bloody in subject and vulgar in tone. [M. E. dreden--A.S. on-dr['æ]dan, to fear; Ice. ondréda, Old High Ger. in-tratan, to be afraid.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  38. Be in great fear of; shrink from, look forward to with terror; fear greatly (that, to learn &c.), be afraid (to do). (N.) great fear, awe, apprehension; object of fear or awe. [Middle English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  39. Dreaded, dreadful; awful, revered. [Middle English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  40. n. Overwhelming apprehension of danger; terror, —reverential or respectful fear; awe;—an object of terrified apprehension or of reverential fear. Cabinet Dictionary
  41. Fear, terror; awe; the person or thing feared. Complete Dictionary
  42. Terrible, frightful; awful, venerable in the highest degree. Complete Dictionary

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