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Definitions of embrace

  1. take up the cause, ideology, practice, method, of someone and use it as one's own; "She embraced Catholocism"; "They adopted the Jewish faith" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. a close affectionate and protective acceptance; "his willing embrace of new ideas"; "in the bosom of the family" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. hug, usually with fondness; "Hug me, please"; "They embraced" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. include in scope; include as part of something broader; have as one's sphere or territory; "This group encompasses a wide range of people from different backgrounds"; "this should cover everyone in the group" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. the act of clasping another person in the arms (as in greeting or affection) Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. the state of taking in or encircling; "an island in the embrace of the sea" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. To fasten on, as armor. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. To clasp in the arms with affection; to take in the arms; to hug. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. To cling to; to cherish; to love. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. To seize eagerly, or with alacrity; to accept with cordiality; to welcome. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. To encircle; to encompass; to inclose. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. To include as parts of a whole; to comprehend; to take in; as, natural philosophy embraces many sciences. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. To accept; to undergo; to submit to. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. To attempt to influence corruptly, as a jury or court. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. To join in an embrace. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  16. Intimate or close encircling with the arms; pressure to the bosom; clasp; hug. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. To hold in the arms, or press to the bosom with affection; hug; cling to; receive with willingness; include; inclose. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  18. The act of embracing; a clasping in the arms; a hug. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  19. To take in the arms: to press to the bosom with affection: to take eagerly or willingly: to comprise: to admit or receive. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  20. An embracing: fond pressure in the arms. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  21. A clasping in the arms. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  22. To clasp in the arms; receive willingly; comprise. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  23. To infold in the arms; clasp; hug; accept; willingly; comprehend; include. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  24. Pressure to the bosom with the arms; reception of one thing into another; sexual intercourse; conjugal endearment. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  25. To take and clasp in the arms; to press to the bosom in token of affection; to seize eagerly; to take with willingness that which offers or is offered; to comprehend; to comprise; to encompass; to accept; to have carnal intercourse with. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  26. To take or inclose in the arms; to press or clasp to the bosom in token of affection; to seize eagerly; to include or take in; to comprehend; to accept; to admit. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  27. Pressure to the bosom with the arms; a hug; sexual intercourse. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  28. em-br[=a]s', v.t. to take in the arms: to press to the bosom with affection: to take eagerly or willingly: to comprise: to admit, adopt, or receive.--v.i. to join in an embrace.--n. an embracing: fond pressure in the arms.--ns. EMBRACE'MENT; EMBRAC'ER.--adjs. EMBRAC'ING, EMBRAC'IVE.--adv. EMBRAC'INGLY.--n. EMBRAC'INGNESS. [O. Fr. embracer (Fr. embrasser)--L. in, in, into, bracchium, an arm. See BRACE.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  29. em-br[=a]s', v.t. (Spens.) to brace, to fasten, or bind:--pr.p. embrac'ing; pa.p. embraced'. [Em, in, and brace.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  30. Fold (person &c.; in pl. abs. =e. one another) in the arms, usu. as sign of affection; clasp, enclose; accept eagerly (offer, opportunity, &c.); adopt (course of action, doctrine, party, cause); (of things) include, comprise; (of persons) comprise (thing in a formula, report, &c.); take in with eye or mind; (n.) folding in the arms, (euphem.) sexual intercourse. Hence embraceable a., embracement n. [old French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  31. n. Close encircling with the arms; pressure to the bosom; clasp; hug. Cabinet Dictionary
  32. To hold fondly in the arms, to squeeze in kindness; to seize ardently or eagerly, to lay hold on, to welcome; to comprehend, to take in, to encircle; to comprise, to inclose, to contain. Complete Dictionary
  33. Clasp, fond pressure in the arms, hug. Complete Dictionary

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