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Definitions of groove

  1. To cut a groove or channel in; to form into channels or grooves; to furrow. Webster Dictionary DB
  2. To form or cut a furrow in; as, groove that cement so that the water will run off. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  3. To grave or cut a groove or furrow in. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  4. To make a groove in. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  5. To form a groove in; shape like a groove. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  6. To cut a furrow or groove in. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  7. To furrow; to cut a channel with an edged tool. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  8. a settled and monotonous routine that is hard to escape; "they fell into a conversational rut" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. make a groove in, or provide with a groove; "groove a vinyl record" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  10. A furrow, channel, or long hollow, such as may be formed by cutting, molding, grinding, the wearing force of flowing water, or constant travel; a depressed way; a worn path; a rut. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. Hence: The habitual course of life, work, or affairs; fixed routine. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. A shaft or excavation. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. A channel or furrow, especially as cut by a tool; as, the plate sits in the groove on the rack; settled habit or routine. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  14. A furrow, or long hollow, such as is cut with a tool. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  15. A narrow furrow, of channel. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  16. A furrow or long hollow, as cut by a tool. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  17. A furrow or long hollow cut by a tool; a shaft or pit sunk into the earth. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  18. Any channel, furrow, or depression, as carotid, costal, optic, primitive vertebral groove. A dictionary of scientific terms. By Henderson, I. F.; Henderson, W. D. Published 1920.

What are the misspellings for groove?

Usage examples for groove

  1. I can then continue the groove as a channel by a glass tube at each end, there being a free passage through the whole. – The Chemical History Of A Candle by Michael Faraday
  2. Meanwhile his assistants go their own ways, each narrowing into his own little intellectual groove – The School and the World by Victor Gollancz and David Somervell
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