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Definitions of horse

  1. a framework for holding wood that is being sawed Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. unacceptable behavior (especially ludicrously false statements); "I put up with a lot of bullshit from that jerk"; "what he said was mostly bull" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. troops trained to fight on horseback; "500 horse led the attack" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. solid-hoofed herbivorous quadruped domesticated since prehistoric times Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. provide with a horse or horses Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. a padded gymnastic apparatus on legs Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. a chessman in the shape of a horse's head; can move two squares horizontally and one vertically (or vice versa) Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. A hoofed quadruped of the genus Equus; especially, the domestic horse (E. caballus), which was domesticated in Egypt and Asia at a very early period. It has six broad molars, on each side of each jaw, with six incisors, and two canine teeth, both above and below. The mares usually have the canine teeth rudimentary or wanting. The horse differs from the true asses, in having a long, flowing mane, and the tail bushy to the base. Unlike the asses it has callosities, or chestnuts, on all its legs. The horse excels in strength, speed, docility, courage, and nobleness of character, and is used for drawing, carrying, bearing a rider, and like purposes. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. The male of the genus horse, in distinction from the female or male; usually, a castrated male. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. A frame with legs, used to support something; as, a clotheshorse, a sawhorse, etc. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. A frame of timber, shaped like a horse, on which soldiers were made to ride for punishment. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. Anything, actual or figurative, on which one rides as on a horse; a hobby. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. See Footrope, a. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. A breastband for a leadsman. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. An iron bar for a sheet traveler to slide upon. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. A jackstay. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. To provide with a horse, or with horses; to mount on, or as on, a horse. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. To sit astride of; to bestride. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. To take or carry on the back; as, the keeper, horsing a deer. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. To place on the back of another, or on a wooden horse, etc., to be flogged; to subject to such punishment. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. To get on horseback. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  22. Horseplay; tomfoolery. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. Mounted soldiery; cavalry; - used without the plural termination; as, a regiment of horse; - distinguished from foot. Webster Dictionary DB
  24. A mass of earthy matter, or rock of the same character as the wall rock, occurring in the course of a vein, as of coal or ore; hence, to take horse - said of a vein - is to divide into branches for a distance. Webster Dictionary DB
  25. To cover, as a mare; - said of the male. Webster Dictionary DB
  26. A translation or other illegitimate aid in study or examination; - called also trot, pony, Dobbin. Webster Dictionary DB
  27. Large, hoofed mammals of the family EQUIDAE. Horses are active day and night with most of the day spent seeking and consuming food. Feeding peaks occur in the early morning and late afternoon, and there are several daily periods of rest. Medical Dictionary DB
  28. A solid-hoofed quadruped, used for riding or drawing burdens; a male of the species; cavalry; a framework or machine for the support of anything. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  29. To mount on, or furnish with, a horse; carry on horseback; place astride. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  30. A perissodactyl (odd-toed), solidungulate (single-hoofed), quadrupedal mammal, Equus caballus, having a long and coarse-haired mane and tail, with short-haired coat, and corneous patches on the inner side of the legs between the knee and hock; employed chiefly as a draft animal. A practical medical dictionary. By Stedman, Thomas Lathrop. Published 1920.
  31. A well-known quadruped: (collectively) cavalry: that by which something is supported. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  32. To mount on a horse: to provide with a horse: to sit astride: to carry on the back. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  33. A solid-hoofed quadruped; cavalry; contrivance for carrying or supporting. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  34. To place on, or furnish with, a horse. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  35. To mount or carry, as on a horse; furnish horses for. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  36. A solid hoofed quadruped having a mane and tail of long coarse hair, and relatively small ears and head. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  37. The male of the horse. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  38. Mounted troops; cavalry. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  39. A well-known quadruped of the genus equns; a male of the species; cavalry; that by which something is supported; a foot-rope along a yard, to support the sailors while they loose, reef, or furl the sails; a sloping table on which pressmen place their sheets, preparatory to printing. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  40. To mount on horse; to provide with a horse; to sit astride; to carry on the back; to cover a mare. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  41. To get on horseback. To take horse, to set out to ride on horseback; to be covered, as a mare. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  42. A well-known domestic animal; cavalry; a wooden frame; a large stool or tressel. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  43. To work or furnish with a horse; to ride or sit on anything astride. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  44. Applied to something large and coarse. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  45. The most striking feature in the biblical notices of the horse is the exclusive application of it to warlike operations; in no instance is that useful animal employed for the purposes of ordinary locomotion or agriculture, if we except ( Isaiah 28:28 ) The animated description of the horse in ( Job 39:19-25 ) applies solely to the war-horse. The Hebrews in the patriarchal age, as a pastoral race, did not stand in need of the services Of the horse, and for a long period after their settlement in Canaan they dispensed with it, partly in consequence of the hilly nature of the country, which only admitted of the use of chariots in certain localities, ( Judges 1:19 ) and partly in consequence to the prohibition in ( 17:16 ) which would be held to apply at all periods. David first established a force of cavalry and chariots, ( 2 Samuel 8:4 ) but the great supply of horses was subsequently effected by Solomon through his connection with Egypt. ( 1 Kings 4:26 ) Solomon also established a very active trade in horses, which were brought by dealers out of Egypt and resold, at a profit, to the Hittites. With regard to the trappings and management of the horse we have little information. The bridle was placed over the horses nose, ( Isaiah 30:28 ) and a bit or curb is also mentioned. ( 2 Kings 19:28 ; Psalms 32:9 ; Proverbs 26:3 ; Isaiah 37:29 ) In the Authorized Version it is incorrectly given "bridle," with the exception of ( Psalms 32:1 ) ... Saddles were not used until a late period. The horses were not shod, and therefore hoofs are hard "as flint," ( Isaiah 5:28 ) were regarded as a great merit. The chariot-horses were covered with embroidered trappings ( Ezekiel 27:20 ) Horses and chariots were used also in idolatrous processions, as noticed in regard to the sun. ( 2 Kings 23:11 ) biblestudytools.com
  46. Mounted soldiery; cavalry; -- used without the plural termination; as, a regiment of horse; -- distinguished from foot. mso.anu.edu.au
  47. A mass of earthy matter, or rock of the same character as the wall rock, occurring in the course of a vein, as of coal or ore; hence, to take horse -- said of a vein -- is to divide into branches for a distance. mso.anu.edu.au
  48. To cover, as a mare; -- said of the male. mso.anu.edu.au
  49. always referred to in the Bible in connection with warlike operations, except Isaiah 28:28 . The war-horse is described Job 39:19-25 . For a long period after their settlement in Canaan the Israelites made no use of horses, according to the prohibition, Deuteronomy 17:16 . David was the first to form a force of cavalry ( 2 Samuel 8:4 ). But Solomon, from his connection with Egypt, greatly multiplied their number ( 1 Kings 4:26 ; 1 Kings 10:26 1 Kings 10:29 ). After this, horses were freely used in Israel ( 1 Kings 22:4 ; 2 Kings 3:7 ; 1 Kings 9:21 1 Kings 9:33 ; 11:16 ). The furniture of the horse consisted simply of a bridle ( Isaiah 30:28 ) and a curb ( Psalms 32:9 ). biblestudytools.com
  50. An animal of the genus eqiuts and species cabaUus. In a narrow and strictsense, the term is applied only to the male, and only to males of four years old orthereabouts, younger horses being called "colts." But even in this sense the termincludes both stallions and geldings. In a wider sense, and as generally used instatutes, the word is taken as nomen generalissimum, and includes not only horsesstrictly so called, but also colts, mares and fillies, and mules and asses. See Owens v.State, 38 Tex. 557; Ashworth v. Mounsey, L. R. 9 Exch. 187; I'ul- len v. State, 11 Tex.App. 91; Allison v. Brookshire, 38 Tex. 201; State v. Ingram, 16 Kan. 19; State v.Dunnavant, 3 Brev. (S. C.) 10, 5 Am. Dec. 530; State v. Gooch, 60 Ark. 218, 29 S. W.640; Davis v. Collier, 13 Ga. 491. Compare Richardson v. Chicago 4 A. R. Co., 149 Mo.311, 50 S. W. 7S2. thelawdictionary.org
  51. Until a horse has attained the age of four years, he is called a colt. (q. v.) Russ. & Ry. 416. This word is sometimes used as a generic name for all animals of the horse kind. 3 Brev. 9. Vide Colt; Gender; and Yelv. 67, a. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  52. hors, n. a well-known quadruped: (collectively) cavalry: that by which something is supported, as 'clothes-horse,' &c.: a wooden frame on which soldiers were formerly made to ride as a punishment--also Timber-mare: a boy's crib, a translation.--v.t. to mount on a horse: to provide with a horse: to sit astride: to carry on the back: to urge at work tyrannically: to construe by means of a crib.--v.i. to get on horseback: to charge for work before it is done.--ns. HORSE'-ARTILL'ERY, field artillery with comparatively light guns and the gunners mounted; HORSE'BACK, the back of a horse; HORSE'-BEAN, a large bean given to horses; HORSE'-BLOCK, a block or stage by which to mount or dismount from a horse; HORSE'-BOAT, a boat for carrying horses, or one towed by a horse; HORSE'-BOX, a railway car for transporting horses in, or a stall on shipboard; HORSE'-BOY, a stable-boy; HORSE'-BREAK'ER, HORSE'-TAM'ER, one whose business is to break or tame horses, or to teach them to draw or carry (PRETTY HORSE-BREAKER, a woman with little virtue to lose); HORSE'-CAR, a car drawn by horses; HORSE'-CHEST'NUT, a large variety of chestnut, prob. so called from its coarseness contrasted with the edible chestnut: the tree that produces it (see CHESTNUT); HORSE'-CLOTH, a cloth for covering a horse; HORSE'-COUP'ER (Scot.), a horse-dealer; HORSE'-DEAL'ER, one who deals in horses; HORSE'-DOC'TOR, a veterinary surgeon; HORSE'-DRENCH, a dose of physic for a horse.--adj. HORSE'-FACED, having a long face.--ns. HORSE'-FLESH, the flesh of a horse: horses collectively: a Bahama mahogany.--adj. of reddish-bronze colour.--ns. HORSE'-FLY, a large fly that stings horses; HORSE'-FOOT, the colt's foot; HORSE'-GOD'MOTHER, a fat clumsy woman.--n.pl. HORSE'-GUARDS, horse-soldiers employed as guards: the 3d heavy cavalry regiment of the British army, forming part of the household troops: the War Office, or public office in Whitehall, London, appropriated to the departments of the commander-in-chief of the British army.--ns. HORSE'-HAIR, the hair of horses: haircloth; HORSE'-HOE, a hoe drawn by horses; HORSE'-KNACK'ER, one who buys worn-out horses for slaughtering; HORSE'-LAT'ITUDES, a part of the North Atlantic Ocean noted for long calms, so called from the frequent necessity of throwing part of a cargo of horses overboard from want of water when becalmed; HORSE'-LAUGH, a harsh, boisterous laugh; HORSE'-LEECH, a large species of leech, so named from its fastening on horses when wading in the water: a bloodsucker (Prov. xxx. 15); HORSE'-LITT'ER, a litter or bed borne between two horses; HORSE'-MACK'EREL, one of various fishes--the scad (q.v.), &c.; HORSE'MAN, a rider on horseback: a mounted soldier; HORSE'MANSHIP, the art of riding, and of training and managing horses; HORSE'-MA'RINE, a person quite out of his element: an imaginary being for whom wild flights of imagination had best be reserved ('Tell it to the horse-marines'); HORSE-MILL, a mill turned by horses; HORSE'-MILL'INER, one who provides the trappings for horses; HORSE'-MINT, a common European wild-mint: the American Monarda punctata--SWEET HORSE-MINT, the common dittany; HORSE'-NAIL, a nail for fastening a horse-shoe to the hoof; HORSE'-PIS'TOL, a large pistol carried in a holster; HORSE'-PLAY, rough, boisterous play; HORSE'-POND, a pond for watering horses at; HORSE'-POW'ER, the power a horse can exert, or its equivalent=that required to raise 33,000 lb. avoirdupois one foot per minute: a standard for estimating the power of steam-engines; HORSE'-RACE, a race by horses; HORSE'-RAC'ING, the practice of racing or running horses in matches; HORSE'-RAD'ISH, a plant with a pungent root, used in medicine and as a condiment; HORSE'-RAKE, a rake drawn by horses; HORSE'-RID'ING, a circus; HORSE'-SENSE, plain robust sense; HORSE'-SHOE, a shoe for horses, consisting of a curved piece of iron.--adj. shaped like a horse-shoe.--ns. HORSE'-SOL'DIER, a cavalry soldier; HORSE'-TAIL, a genus of leafless plants with hollow rush-like stems, so called from their likeness to a horse's tail; HORSE'-TRAIN'ER, one who trains horses for racing, &c.; HORSE'-WAY, a road by which a horse may pass; HORSE'-WHIP, a whip for driving horses.--v.t. to strike with a horse-whip: to lash.--ns. HORSE'WOMAN, a woman who rides on horseback; HORS'INESS; HORS'ING, birching a schoolboy mounted on another's back.--adj. HORS'Y, of or pertaining to horses: devoted to horse racing or breeding.--A DARK HORSE (see DARK); FLOG A DEAD HORSE, to try to work up excitement about a threadbare subject; GET ON, MOUNT, THE HIGH HORSE, to assume consequential airs; PUT THE CART BEFORE THE HORSE (see CART); RIDE THE WOODEN HORSE (see above); TAKE HORSE, to mount on horseback. [A.S. hors; Ice. horss, Old High Ger. hros (Ger. ross).] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  53. Solid-hoofed quadruped with flowing mane& tail, used as beast of burden& draught, & for riding on; (esp.) adult male h., stallion or gelding, (cf. MARE, COLT); (collect. pl.) cavalry; light h., lightly armed mounted soldiers; SEA-h.; vaulting-block in gymnasium; frame (often with legs) on which something is supported, as clothes-h.; (Naut.) rope, bar, in various uses; (Mining) obstruction in vein; to h., (as command) mount your h.; FLOG a dead h.; grin through a h.-collar, practise elementary humour; look a gift h. in the mouth, find fault with a gift; mount, ride, the high h., put on airs; DARK, WILLING, h.; put the CART before the h.; eat, work, like a h. (much); on horseback, mounted on a h.; h. artillery (of mounted soldiers); h.-block, small platform of stone or wood for mounting h.; h.-box, closed vehicle for taking h. by rail or for slinging h. into ship, (facet.) large pew; h.-breaker, one who breaks in hh.; h.-chestnut, large tree with conical clusters of white or pink flower, fruit of this (like edible chestnut, but of coarse bitter taste); h.-cloth (used to cover h., or as part of trappings); h.-COPER; h.-flesh, flesh of h., esp. as food, horses collectively; h.-fly, insect (of various kinds) troublesome to hh.; H. Guards, cavalry brigade of English Household troops, esp. (Royal H. G.) third regiment of it, (also) head-quarters of such cavalry, esp. a building opposite White hall, (also) military authorities at head of army; horse-hair, hair from mane or tail of h. (often attrib.); h. latitudes, belt of calms at northern edge of N.E. trade-winds; h.-laugh, loud coarse laugh; h.-leech, large kind of leech, insatiable person, (daughters of the h.-leech, Provencal xxx. 15); horseman, (skilled) rider on horseback; horsemanship, art of riding, skill in riding, on horseback; h.-marines, imaginary corps of mounted marines, as type of men out of their element, (Provencal) tell that (nonsense) to the h.-marines; h.-play, boisterous play; h.-pond (for watering& washing horses, Provencal as ducking-place for obnoxious persons); h.-power, machine by which work of h. is made to drive other machinery, (Mech.) unit of work,=550 foot-pounds per second (abbr. h.p.); h.-race (between hh. with riders); h.-radish, plant whose pungent root is scraped or grated as condiment; horseshoe, iron shoe for h., thing of this shape; h.-tail, tail of h. (used in Turkey as standard, or as ensign denoting rank of pasha), genus of cryptogamous plants like h. s tail; horse-whip, whip for h., (v.t.) chastise (person) with this; horsewoman, woman who rides on horseback. Hence horseless a. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  54. Provide (person, vehicle) with horse (s); carry (person) on one\'s back; place person on man\'s back to be flogged; (intr.) mount, go, on horseback. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  55. h. mushroom, coarse but edible variety with hollow stem. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  56. (Naut.) A crosspiece, upon standards, on which booms, boats, etc., are lashed. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  57. (Naut.) A foot-rope fastened at both ends of, and hanging below, a yard, for the men to stand on when reefing, etc. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  58. (Naut.) The iron bar across the deck on which the sheets of a fore-and-aft sail travel. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  59. (Naut.) Various large ropes in the running rigging. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  60. n. [Anglo-Saxon, French, German, Sanskrit] A well-known hoofed quadruped used for draught or the saddle;—the male of the genus horse in distinction from the female;—mounted soldiery; cavalry;—a frame with legs used for supporting something;—a wooden machine on which soldiers ride for punishment;—a rope stretched under the yard on which sailors stand when handing the sails. Cabinet Dictionary
  61. A neighing quadruped, used in war, and draught and carriage; it is used in the plural sense, but with a singular termination, for horses, horsemen, or cavalry; something on which any thing is supported; a wooden machine which soldiers ride by way of punishment; joined to another substantive, it signifies something large or coarse, as a horse-face, a face of which the features are large and in delicate. Complete Dictionary

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