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Definitions of wild

  1. (of the elements) as if showing violent anger; "angry clouds on the horizon"; "furious winds"; "the raging sea" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. without civilizing influences; "barbarian invaders"; "barbaric practices"; "a savage people"; "fighting is crude and uncivilized especially if the weapons are efficient"-Margaret Meade; "wild tribes" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. located in a dismal or remote area; desolate; "a desert island"; "a godforsaken wilderness crossroads"; "a wild stretch of land"; "waste places" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. a wild primitive state untouched by civilization; "he lived in the wild" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. in an uncontrolled and rampant manner; "weeds grew rampantly around here" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. talking or behaving irrationally; "a raving lunatic" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. produced without being planted or without human labor; "wild strawberries" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. in a natural state; not tamed or domesticated or cultivated; "wild geese"; "edible wild plants" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. (of colors or sounds) intensely vivid or loud; "a violent clash of colors"; "her dress was a violent red"; "a violent noise"; "wild colors"; "wild shouts" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. marked by extreme lack of restraint or control; "wild ideas"; "wild talk"; "wild originality"; "wild parties" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. a wild and uninhabited area Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  12. in a wild or undomesticated manner; "growing wild"; "roaming wild" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  13. not subjected to control or restraint; "a piano played with a wild exuberance"- Louis Bromfield Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  14. deviating widely from an intended course; "a wild bullet"; "a wild pitch" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  15. in a state of extreme emotion; "wild with anger"; "wild with grief" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  16. Living in a state of nature; inhabiting natural haunts, as the forest or open field; not familiar with, or not easily approached by, man; not tamed or domesticated; as, a wild boar; a wild ox; a wild cat. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. Growing or produced without culture; growing or prepared without the aid and care of man; native; not cultivated; brought forth by unassisted nature or by animals not domesticated; as, wild parsnip, wild camomile, wild strawberry, wild honey. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. Desert; not inhabited or cultivated; as, wild land. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. Savage; uncivilized; not refined by culture; ferocious; rude; as, wild natives of Africa or America. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. Not submitted to restraint, training, or regulation; turbulent; tempestuous; violent; ungoverned; licentious; inordinate; disorderly; irregular; fanciful; imaginary; visionary; crazy. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. Exposed to the wind and sea; unsheltered; as, a wild roadstead. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. An uninhabited and uncultivated tract or region; a forest or desert; a wilderness; a waste; as, the wilds of America; the wilds of Africa. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. Wildly; as, to talk wild. Webster Dictionary DB
  24. Indicating strong emotion, intense excitement, or ewilderment; as, a wild look. Webster Dictionary DB
  25. Hard to steer; - said of a vessel. Webster Dictionary DB
  26. Living in its natural state; untamed; as, a wild animal; uncultivated; as, wild flowers; not civilized; savage; violent; uncontrolled; passionate; unreasonsble; disorderly; reckless; greatly excited; noisily gay; colloquially, eager. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  27. A desert or wilderness. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  28. Wildly. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  29. Wildness. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  30. Being in a state of nature: not tamed or cultivated: uncivilized: desert: unsheltered: violent: licentious. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  31. An uncultivated region: a forest or desert. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  32. An uncultivated or desert region. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  33. Not tamed, or cultivated; fierce; savage: bereft of reason: desert: licentious. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  34. Not tamed; uncivilized; uninhabited; uninhabited. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  35. Dissolute; prodigal. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  36. Stormy; turbulent; keen; eager. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  37. An uninhabited or uncultivated place; a wilderness. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  38. Roving; wandering; inhabiting the forest or open field; not tamed or domesticated; growing without culture; desert; not inhabited; savage; uncivilised; not refined by culture; turbulent; tempestuous; irregular; licentious; inconstant; inordinate; loose; disorderly; not framed according to the ordinary rules of reason; imaginary; fanciful; exposed to wind and sea. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  39. A desert; an uncultivated or uninhabited tract or region; a forest or sandy desert. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  40. An epithet applied especially to the names of plants, to distinguish them from such of the name as are cultivated in gardens, as wild olive. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  41. Being in a state of nature; not tamed or domesticated; growing without culture; savage; uncivilised; desert; uninhabited; tempestuous; profligate; reckless; ungoverned; irregular; highly excited, as with passion; having a fierce untamed look; performed without plan or order; imaginary. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  42. An uncultivated tract of land; a desert. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  43. Hard to steer; -- said of a vessel. mso.anu.edu.au
  44. Indicating strong emotion, intense excitement, or as, a wild look. dictgcide_fs
  45. Hard to steer; said of a vessel. dictgcide_fs
  46. w[=i]ld, adj. frolicsome, light-hearted: being in a state of nature: not tamed or cultivated: uncivilised: desert: unsheltered: violent: eager, keen: licentious: fantastic: wide of the mark.--n. an uncultivated region: a forest or desert.--ns. W[=I]LD'-ASS, an Asiatic or African ass living naturally in a wild state; W[=I]LD'-BOAR, a wild swine or animal of the hog kind.--adj. W[=I]LD'-BORN, born in a wild state.--n. W[=I]LD'-CAT, the undomesticated cat.--adj. (U.S.) haphazard, reckless, unsound financially.--ns. W[=I]LD'-CHERR'Y, any uncultivated tree bearing cherries, or its fruit; W[=I]LD'-DUCK, any duck excepting the domesticated duck.--v.t. WILDER (wil'd[.e]r), to bewilder.--v.i. to wander widely or wildly.--adv. WIL'DEREDLY, in a wildered manner.--ns. WIL'DERING, any plant growing wild, esp. one that has escaped from a state of cultivation; WIL'DERMENT, confusion; WIL'DERNESS, a wild or waste place: an uncultivated region: a confused mass: (Shak.) wildness; W[=I]LD'-FIRE, a composition of inflammable materials: a kind of lightning flitting at intervals: a disease of sheep; W[=I]LD'-FOWL, the birds of the duck tribe: game-birds; W[=I]LD'-FOWL'ING, the pursuit of wild-fowl; W[=I]LD'-GOOSE, a bird of the goose kind which is wild or feral; W[=I]LD'-GOOSE-CHASE (see CHASE); W[=I]LD-HON'EY, the honey of wild bees; W[=I]LD'ING, that which grows wild or without cultivation: a wild crab-apple.--adj. uncultivated.--adj. W[=I]LD'ISH, somewhat wild.--n. W[=I]LD'-LAND, land completely uncultivated.--adv. W[=I]LD'LY.--ns. W[=I]LD'NESS; W[=I]LD'-OAT, a tall perennial Old World grass.--adj. W[=I]LD'-WOOD, belonging to wild uncultivated wood.--n. a forest.--WILD ANIMALS, undomesticated animals; WILD BIRDS, birds not domesticated, esp. those protected at certain seasons under the Act of 1880; WILD HUNT, the name given in Germany to a noise sometimes heard in the air at night, mostly between Christmas and Epiphany, as of a host of spirits rushing along, accompanied by the shouting of huntsmen and the baying of dogs--the 'Seven Whistlers' and 'Gabriel's Hounds' of our own north country; WILD SHOT, a chance shot.--Run wild, to take to loose living: to revert to the wild or uncultivated state; SOW WILD OATS (see OAT). [A.S. wild; prob. orig. 'self-willed,' from the root of will; Ger. wild.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  47. w[=i]ld, a variety of weald. gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  48. Not domesticated or cultivated (chiefly of animals& plants, & esp. of species allied to others that are not w.; in the commoner combinations w. & the n. are hyphened, or treated as one wd with accent on w.; w. beast, plant; w. man, savage; w. ass; w.-boar; w.-duck; wildfowl; w. vine; wildcat lit., also fig. as a. or attrib. of finance or commercial speculations, reckless, unsound; wild-goose lit., also in w.-g. chase, absurdly impossible enterprise; w. horse, also in be drawn by w. horses, form of torture& death; w. hyacinth, bluebell; w. oats; w. scenery &c., of conspicuously desolate appearance; woodnotes w., spontaneous& artless poetry); (of horses, game-birds, &c.) shy, given to shying, easily startled, hard to get near; unrestrained, wayward, disorderly, irregular, out of control, unconventional, (a w. fellow; settled down after a w. youth; w. work, lawless doings; hair hanging in w. locks; living in w. times; room is in w. disorder; run w., grow unchecked or untrained); tempestuous, violent, (a w. wind, night, &c.); intensely eager, excited, frantic, passionate, distracted, mad, (is w. with excitement, to try it; w. about person or subject, enthusiastically devoted to; w. delight, excitement, enthusiasm, grief, rage; w. looks, appearance, &c., indicating distraction; drive w., madden); haphazard, rash, ill-considered, ill-aimed, disturbed by excitement, (a w. guess, shot, blow, venture; w. opinions, bowling; also as adv., as shoot, talk, w.); wildfire, = Greek FIRE (report spreads like w.-f., very fast); hence wildish (2) a., wildly adv., wildness N. (N.) desert, w. tract. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary

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