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Definitions of wire

  1. To furnish with wire; fasten with wire. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  2. To place (a ball) so that the wire of a wicket prevents a successful shot. Webster Dictionary DB
  3. To bind with wire; to attach with wires; to apply wire to; as, to wire corks in bottling liquors. Webster Dictionary DB
  4. To put upon a wire; as, to wire beads. Webster Dictionary DB
  5. To snare by means of a wire or wires. Webster Dictionary DB
  6. To send (a message) by telegraph. Webster Dictionary DB
  7. To bind with wire; stiffen with wire; thread on wire; colloquially, to send a message to by telegraph. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  8. To bind with wire; to apply wire to; as, to wire corks in bottling liquors: to put upon a wire; as, to wire beads: to snare by means of a wire; as, to wire a bird: in teleg. to send by telegraph, as a message; to telegraph; as, wire a reply. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  9. To flow in currents as thin as wire, to communicate by means of the telegraph; to telegraph; as, I wired immediately on arrival. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  10. To pass like a wire; to flow in a wirelike form, or in a tenuous stream. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. To send a telegraphic message. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. equip for use with electricity; "electrify an appliance" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  13. provide with electrical circuits, as of a house or a car Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  14. fasten with wire; "The columns were wired to the beams for support" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  15. string on a wire, as of beads Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  16. To bind or supply with wire. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  17. a metal conductor that carries electricity over a distance Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  18. ligament made of metal and used to fasten things or make cages or fences etc Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  19. the finishing line on a racetrack Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  20. string on a wire; "wire beads" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  21. provide with electrical circuits; "wire the addition to the house" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  22. The string of a musical instrument. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  23. A message transmitted by telegraph. Webster Dictionary DB
  24. The system of wires used to operate the puppets in a puppet show; Webster Dictionary DB
  25. the network of hidden influences controlling the action of a person or organization; as, to pull the wires for office. Webster Dictionary DB
  26. One who picks women's pockets. Webster Dictionary DB
  27. A knitting needle. Webster Dictionary DB
  28. A wire stretching across over a race track at the judges' stand, to mark the line at which the races end. Webster Dictionary DB
  29. A thread or slender rod of metal; a metallic substance formed to an even thread by being passed between grooved rollers, or drawn through holes in a plate of steel. Webster Dictionary DB
  30. A telegraph wire or cable; hence, an electric telegraph; as, to send a message by wire. Webster Dictionary DB
  31. A thread of metal; a telegraph wire or cable; colloquially, a telegram. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  32. A threat of metal: any metalic substance drawn to an even thread of slender rod of uniform diameter by being passed between grooved rollers or drawn through holes in a plate of steel, etc. Wire is usually cylindrical, but it is also made of various other forms, as oval, half-round, square, and triangular, and or more complicated shapes for small pinions, for forming the pattern on blocks for calico-printing, and for other purposes. The term wire has also a collective signification, being frequently used to designate a quantity of metallic threads. The metals most commonly drawn into wire are gold, silver, copper, and iron; but the finest wire is made from platina. Used absolutely for telegraph wire; and hence, the telegraph; as, send on order per wire. "In India the wild beasta and monkeys destroy or play upon the wires, which are perhaps recording at the time a minute on Education."-W. H. Russell. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  33. A thread of metal. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  34. A slender strand or thread of metal, formed by drawing through dies or holes. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  35. A telegraphic system using wires; a telegram. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  36. A secret means of influence; as, to pull the wires. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  37. A thread of metal; any metallic substance drawn to an even thread; telegraph. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  38. A piece of metal drawn into twine or thread. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.

What are the misspellings for wire?

Usage examples for wire

  1. I sent the wire in the secret hope that it would bring my lord and master on the run. – The Prairie Mother by Arthur Stringer
  2. Seems that we missed that wire eh, along here? – The Sky Pilot in No Man's Land by Ralph Connor
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