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Definitions of broil

  1. To be greatly heated; to sweat with heat. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  2. To cook by direct heat, as over coals. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  3. To cook by direct exposure to heat over a fire, esp. upon a gridiron over coals. Webster Dictionary DB
  4. To subject to great (commonly direct) heat. Webster Dictionary DB
  5. To cook directly over a hot fire, as on a gridiron or a fork. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  6. To cook over hot coals. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  7. To dress or cook over coals, or at a flame. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  8. To be subjected to the action of heat, as meat over the fire; to be greatly heated, or to be made uncomfortable with heat. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. To be exposed to great heat; to be heated by excitement. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  10. To be greatly heated. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  11. cook under a broiler; "broil fish" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  12. To cook over hot coals, generally upon a gridiron. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  13. To agitate by exposure over the fire; to dress meat over a fire on a gridiron; to be subjected to the action of great heat; to be in a great heat. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  14. A tumult; a noisy quarrel; a disturbance; a brawl; contention; discord, either between individuals or in the state. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. A noisy quarrel; a brawl. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  16. A noisy quarrel; confused disturbance. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  17. A turmoil; noisy quarrel; brawl. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  18. A tumult; a noisy quarrel; discord. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  19. A tumult; a jumbled noisy quarrel; discord. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.

What are the misspellings for broil?

Usage examples for broil

  1. " This is a wild and fickle element we dwell on," he answered, while he bowed an acknowledgment for the politeness, and took the seat to which the other invited him by a motion of the hand; " but you know its character, and need not be told that we seamen are seldom certain of any of our movements I loosened the cords of discipline myself to- day," he added, after a moment's pause, " and in some measure invited the broil that followed: But it is passed, like the hurricane and the squall; and the ocean is not now smoother than the tempers of my knaves." – The Red Rover by James Fenimore Cooper
  2. When cold, fill each half foot till half full, and finish with sausage- meat; then dip in butter and egg, roll in crumbs, broil and serve as the above. – Hand-Book of Practical Cookery for Ladies and Professional Cooks by Pierre Blot
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