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Definitions of cradle

  1. To put into or rock in a cradle; soothe; nurse; nurture. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  2. To reap or wash with a cradle, as wheat or ore. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  3. To rock or place in a cradle. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  4. To lay or rock in a cradle. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  5. To lay in a cradle; to cut with a cradle. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  6. run with the stick, in Lacrosse Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. hold gently and carefully; "He cradles the child in his arms" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. wash in a cradle; of gold Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. cut grain with a cradle scythe Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. rock or place in or as if in a cradle; "He cradled the infant in his arms" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. To lay or rock in a cradle; to compose or quiet; to nurse in infancy; to cut and lay corn with a cradle. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  12. To lay or rock in a cradle; to nurse tenderly. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  13. where something originated or was nurtured in its early existence; "the birthplace of civilization" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  14. a trough on rockers used by gold miners to shake earth in water in order to separate the gold Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  15. birth of a person; "he was taught from the cradle never to cry" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  16. wash in a cradle; "cradle gold" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  17. hold or place in or as if in a cradle; "He cradled the infant in his arms" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  18. A bed or cot for a baby, oscillating on rockers or swinging on pivots; hence, the place of origin, or in which anything is nurtured or protected in the earlier period of existence; as, a cradle of crime; the cradle of liberty. Newage Dictionary DB
  19. Infancy, or very early life. Newage Dictionary DB
  20. An implement consisting of a broad scythe for cutting grain, with a set of long fingers parallel to the scythe, designed to receive the grain, and to lay it evenly in a swath. Newage Dictionary DB
  21. A tool used in mezzotint engraving, which, by a rocking motion, raises burrs on the surface of the plate, so preparing the ground. Newage Dictionary DB
  22. A framework of timbers, or iron bars, moving upon ways or rollers, used to support, lift, or carry ships or other vessels, heavy guns, etc., as up an inclined plane, or across a strip of land, or in launching a ship. Newage Dictionary DB
  23. A case for a broken or dislocated limb. Newage Dictionary DB
  24. A frame to keep the bedclothes from contact with the person. Newage Dictionary DB
  25. A machine on rockers, used in washing out auriferous earth; -- also called a rocker. Newage Dictionary DB
  26. A suspended scaffold used in shafts. Newage Dictionary DB
  27. The ribbing for vaulted ceilings and arches intended to be covered with plaster. Newage Dictionary DB
  28. The basket or apparatus in which, when a line has been made fast to a wrecked ship from the shore, the people are brought off from the wreck. Newage Dictionary DB
  29. To lay to rest, or rock, as in a cradle; to lull or quiet, as by rocking. Newage Dictionary DB
  30. To nurse or train in infancy. Newage Dictionary DB
  31. To cut and lay with a cradle, as grain. Newage Dictionary DB
  32. To transport a vessel by means of a cradle. Newage Dictionary DB
  33. To lie or lodge, as in a cradle. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  34. A baby's crib or little bed, often on rockers; infancy; birthplace or origin; as, the cradle of liberty; something resembling in shape a baby's cradle. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  35. A bed or crib in which children are rocked: (fig.) infancy: a frame in which anything is imbedded: a case for a broken, limb: a frame under a ship for launching it: an implement for reaping grain by hand. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  36. A rocking bed for a child; scythe with fingers for cutting grain. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  37. A rocking or swinging bed for an infant; birthplace; origin. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  38. A scythe with fingers that catch the grain when cut. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  39. A frame for sustaining a vessel. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  40. A box on rockers for washing ore. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  41. A crib for rocking children to sleep; birthplace or nursery: infancy; a frame in which a thing is embedded; a case in which a broken leg is laid after being set; a case to protect a wound: a frame placed under the bottom of a ship for launching; a standing bedstead for wounded seamen: a steel instrument resembling a chisel, with one sloping side, used in scraping mezzotints and preparing the plate; a frame of wood with long bending teeth fastened to a scythe, for cutting and laying oats and other grain in a swathe; a contrivance to prevent horses from bitting; a gold-washing machine. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  42. A movable bed in which children are rocked to sleep; infancy; a framework used for various purposes, as in shipbuilding; a rocking-machine. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.

What are the misspellings for cradle?

Usage examples for cradle

  1. It had the sense of home, the welcome of the cradle and the patriarch's chair. – The Judgment House by Gilbert Parker
  2. Then turning to the King of Navarre: " Henriot," said he, " if you ever hear what I did for you last night, or if misfortune come to me, remember this child asleep in its cradle – Marguerite de Valois by Alexandre Dumas
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