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Definitions of dance

  1. skip, leap, or move up and down or sideways; "Dancing flames"; "The children danced with joy" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. taking a series of rhythmical steps (and movements) in time to music Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. an artistic form of nonverbal communication Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. a party for social dancing Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. a party of people assembled for dancing Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. move in a pattern; usually to musical accompaniment; do or perform a dance; "My husband and I like to dance at home to the radio" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. move in a graceful and rhythmical way; "The young girl danced into the room" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. To move with measured steps, or to a musical accompaniment; to go through, either alone or in company with others, with a regulated succession of movements, (commonly) to the sound of music; to trip or leap rhythmically. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. To move nimbly or merrily; to express pleasure by motion; to caper; to frisk; to skip about. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. To cause to dance, or move nimbly or merrily about, or up and down; to dandle. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. The leaping, tripping, or measured stepping of one who dances; an amusement, in which the movements of the persons are regulated by art, in figures and in accord with music. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. A tune by which dancing is regulated, as the minuet, the waltz, the cotillon, etc. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. To move the body and feet rhythmically to music; perform the figures of a dance; move nimbly or merrily. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  14. To give a dancing motion to; perform; as, to dance a jig. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  15. A regulated movement of the feet to a rhythmical musical accompaniment; a dancing party, less formal than a ball; one round of dancing. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  16. To move with measured steps to music. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  17. To make to dance or jump. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  18. The movement of one or more persons with measured steps to music. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  19. To cause to dance or jump. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  20. To move with varied steps to musical time. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  21. To move or cause to move rhythmically to music. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  22. To dandle; leap, quiver, flit, or skip lightly. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  23. A series of rhythmic concerted movements timed to music. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  24. A dancing party; tune to dance by. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  25. Dancer. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  26. A stepping with motions of the body adjusted to the measure of a tune, particularly of two or more in concert. Dance of death, an allegorical representation, of a more or less grimly humorous character, of the universal power of death. To dance attendance, to wait upon so as to gain favour by obsequious attentions. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  27. To make to dance: to dandle. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  28. To leap or move with measured step to music; to leap and frisk about; to move nimbly or up and down. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  29. To move nimbly; to leap and frisk about; to move with measured steps. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  30. The dance is spoken of in Holy Scripture universally as symbolical of some rejoicing, and is often coupled for the sake of contrast with mourning, as in ( Ecclesiastes 3:4 ) comp. Psal 30:11; Matt 11:17 In the earlier period it is found combined with some song or refrain, ( Exodus 15:20 ; Exodus 32:18 Exodus 32:19 ; 1 Samuel 21:11 ) and with the tambourine (Authorized Version "timbrel"), more especially in those impulsive outbursts of popular feeling which cannot find sufficient vent in voice or in gesture singly. Dancing formed a part of the religious ceremonies of the Egyptians, and was also common in private entertainments. For the most part dancing was carried on by the women, the two sexes seldom and not customarily intermingling. The one who happened to be near of kin to the champion of the hour led the dance. In the earlier period of the Judges the dances of the virgins of Shiloh. ( Judges 21:19-23 ) were certainly part of a religious festivity. Dancing also had its place among merely festive amusements, apart from any religious character. ( Jeremiah 31:4 Jeremiah 31:13 ; Mark 6:22 ) [E] indicates this entry was also found in Easton's Bible Dictionary biblestudytools.com
  31. a musical instrument of percussion, supposed to have been used by the Hebrews at an early period of their history. [E] indicates this entry was also found in Easton's Bible Dictionary biblestudytools.com
  32. found in Judges 21:21 Judges 21:23 ; Psalms 30:11 ; 149:3 ; 150:4 ; Jeremiah 31:4 Jeremiah 31:13 , etc., as the translation of hul , which points to the whirling motion of Oriental sacred dances. It is the rendering of a word (rakad') which means to skip or leap for joy, in Eccl. 3:4 ; Job 21:11 ; Isaiah 13:21 , etc. In the New Testament it is in like manner the translation of different Greek words, circular motion ( Luke 15:25 ); leaping up and down in concert ( Matthew 11:17 ), and by a single person ( Matthew 14:6 ). It is spoken of as symbolical of rejoicing (Eccl 3:4 . Compare Psalms 30:11 ; Matthew 11: : 17 ). The Hebrews had their sacred dances expressive of joy and thanksgiving, when the performers were usually females ( Exodus 15:20 ; 1 Samuel 18:6 ). The ancient dance was very different from that common among Western nations. It was usually the part of the women only ( Exodus 15:20 ; Judges 11:34 ; comp 5:1 ). Hence the peculiarity of David's conduct in dancing before the ark of the Lord ( 2 Samuel 6:14 ). The women took part in it with their timbrels. Michal should, in accordance with the example of Miriam and others, have herself led the female choir, instead of keeping aloof on the occasion and "looking through the window." David led the choir "uncovered", i.e., wearing only the ephod or linen tunic. He thought only of the honour of God, and forgot himself. From being reserved for occasions of religious worship and festivity, it came gradually to be practised in common life on occasions of rejoicing ( Jeremiah 31:4 ). The sexes among the Jews always danced separately. The daughter of Herodias danced alone ( Matthew 14:6 ). biblestudytools.com
  33. dans, v.i. to move with measured steps to music: to spring.--v.t. to make to dance or jump.--n. the movement of one or more persons with measured steps to music: the tune to which dancing is performed.--ns. DANCE'-M[=U]'SIC, music specially arranged for accompanying dancing; DANC'ER, one who practises dancing; DANC'ING, the act or art of moving in the dance; DANC'ING-GIRL, a professional dancer; DANC'ING-MAS'TER, a teacher of dancing.--DANCE A BEAR (obs.), to exhibit a performing bear; DANCE ATTENDANCE, to wait obsequiously; DANCE OF DEATH, a series of allegorical paintings symbolising the universal power of death, represented as a skeleton; DANCE UPON NOTHING, to be hanged.--LEAD A PERSON A DANCE, to set him on an undertaking under false hopes: to delude.--MERRY DANCERS, the aurora. [O. Fr. danser, from Teut.; Old High Ger. danson, to draw along.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  34. see Mania, dancing -d. St. Johns, see Mania, dancing -d. St. Vitus’s, Chorea, see Mania, dancing. Medical Lexicon. A Dictionary of Medical Science
  35. Move with rhythmical steps, glides, leaps, revolutions, gestures, &c., usu. to music, alone or with a partner or set (d. to one\'s tune or pipe, follow his lead); jump about, skip, move in lively way (of heart, blood, &c.); bob up and down on water &c. (d. upon nothing, be hanged); perform (minuet, waltz, &c.); d. attendance (upon person), be kept waiting (by), follow about; cause to d. (bears &c.); toss up& down, dandle, (baby); d. away, off, into, &c., lose, bring, &c., by dancing (his head off, his chance away, herself into favour). [old French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  36. Dancing motion (see prec.); some special form of this; single round or turn of one; tune for dancing to, or in d. rhythm; dancingparty; lead (person) a d., entangle him in useless pursuit or toil; D. of Death or of Macabre, medieval picture-subject of Death leading all ranks to grave; St Vitus\'s dance, disorder chiefly in children with convulsive involuntary movements. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  37. A form of exercise or diversion consisting in the execution of a definite series of rhythmical movements of the person or of the lower limbs. Appleton's medical dictionary.
  38. n. A lively motion or leaping, with set steps and postures of the body, in time with measured music;—a figure in which two or more move or leap in concert;—the tune to which dancing is performed. Cabinet Dictionary
  39. A motion of one or many in concert. Complete Dictionary

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