Spellcheck.net

Definitions of executive

  1. someone who manages a government agency or department Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. having the function of carrying out plans or orders etc.; "the executive branch" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. persons who administer the law Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. a person responsible for the administration of a business Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. Designed or fitted for execution, or carrying into effect; as, executive talent; qualifying for, concerned with, or pertaining to, the execution of the laws or the conduct of affairs; as, executive power or authority; executive duties, officer, department, etc. Webster Dictionary DB
  6. An impersonal title of the chief magistrate or officer who administers the government, whether king, president, or governor; the governing person or body. Webster Dictionary DB
  7. Pertaining to the governing body; administrative; active; efficient in carrying out plans. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  8. An official, or body, charged with carrying the laws into effect; the administrative branch of a government. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  9. Having the quality of executing or performing; designed or fitted for execution or carrying into effect; as, executive power or authority, an executive officer: hence, in government, executive is used in distinction from legislative and judicial-the body that deliberates and enacts laws is legislative; the body that judges or applies the laws to particular cases is judicial; the body or person who carries the laws into effect, or superintends the enforcement of them, is executive. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  10. The officer, whether king, president, or other chief magistrate, who superintends the execution of the laws: the person or persons who administer the government: executive power or authority in government: in the U. S. the President, the governors of States, the mayors of cities, etc. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  11. Person or authority that executes the law. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  12. That executes or carries into effect. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  13. Having the power or capacity of executing; administrative. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  14. A person or body that executes the law. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  15. Executing; carrying into execution, or seeing effect given specially to a law or a docrce. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  16. The power in a State appointed to see to the execution of law. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  17. He or those who administer the government; the governing person or body. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  18. Pert. to the governing body. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  19. The command interpreter or shell for anoperating system. The term is used especially aroundmainframes and probably derived from UNIVAC's archaicEXEC 2 and current (in 2000) EXEC 8 operating systems. foldoc_fs
  20. Pertaining to, having the function of, executing; (branch of government) concerned with executing laws, decrees, & sentences (cf. JUDICIAL, legislative). Concise Oxford Dictionary
  21. The executives of the colonies were their Governors, appointed by the crown in must colonies, elected by the people in Rhode Island and Connecticut and in early Massachusetts. At the outbreak of the Revolution, after the royal Governors had ceased to control and before the new Constitutions were set up, the executive was the committee or council of safety. The States, in making their Constitutions, mostly instituted Governors, though some created an executive council, forming an executive like that of Switzerland. From 1775 to 1789 the U. S. Government had no other executive than Congress. The Constitution of 1787 gave executive powers to the President, the Senate sharing in the executive powers of appointment and treaty making. There was talk in the convention of a plural executive, but a single head was finally resolved on. Executive departments had already come into existence. The Continental Congress at first managed all executive business through committees. Later, commissions were formed, partly of its own members, partly of others. Early in 1781 Congress organized departments under single heads-the Secretary for Foreign Affairs, the Superintendent of Finance, the Secretary of War and the Secretary of Marine. The history of these offices and of the departments which followed them in 1789, may be seen under their names individually. Dictionary of United States history
  22. n. The officer, whether king, president, or other magistrate, who superintends the execution of the laws;—governmental power; the ministry. Cabinet Dictionary
  23. Having the quality of executing or performing; active, not deliberative, not legislative, having the power to put in act the laws. Complete Dictionary

What are the misspellings for executive?

X