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Definitions of motive

  1. a theme that is elaborated on in a piece of music Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. impelling to action; "it may well be that ethical language has primarily a motivative function"- Arthur Pap; "motive pleas"; "motivating arguments" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. the psychological feature that arouses an organism to action toward a desired goal; the reason for the action; that which gives purpose and direction to behavior; "we did not understand his motivation"; "he acted with the best of motives" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. causing or able to cause motion; "a motive force"; "motive power"; "motor energy" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. That which moves; a mover. Webster Dictionary DB
  6. That which incites to action; anything prompting or exciting to choise, or moving the will; cause; reason; inducement; object. Webster Dictionary DB
  7. The theme or subject; a leading phrase or passage which is reproduced and varied through the course of a comor a movement; a short figure, or melodic germ, out of which a whole movement is develpoed. See also Leading motive, under Leading. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. That which produces conception, invention, or creation in the mind of the artist in undertaking his subject; the guiding or controlling idea manifested in a work of art, or any part of one. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. Causing motion; having power to move, or tending to move; as, a motive argument; motive power. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. To prompt or incite by a motive or motives; to move. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. That which urges to action; as, love of country is the motive that sends many men to war; reason. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  12. Causing action; as, steam is the motive power in the locomotive. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  13. Causing motion: having power to move. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  14. That which moves or excites to action: inducement: reason. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  15. causing movement. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  16. Inducement; reason. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  17. Having power to move; causing motion. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  18. That which incites to action; incentive; impulse; design; purpose. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  19. Causing motion; having power or tending to move. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  20. That which incites to action or determines the choice; inducement; the subject which a work of art respects, or the spiritual idea which pervades it. Motive force, the sum of force which tends to promote motion. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  21. Causing motion; able or tending to move. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  22. That which actuates or influences; that which determines the choice; inducement; cause; reason; in art, that which produces conception, invention, or creation in the mind of the artist, when undertaking a subject. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  23. 1. In Law, this is why one committed the crime, the inducement, reason, or willful desire and purpose behind the commission of an offense. Whether the purpose was good, like helping someone commit suicide, or bad, like committing murder, it is not a deciding factor in deciding guilt or innocence. But, intent is. In a libel case, it has importance. It may be used by a defending attorney in punishment mitigation or by a prosecuting attorney as circumstantial evidence to prove guilt. 2. In Psychology, this is what energizes people to action and determines their choice of behavior, as concern, desire, emotion, or need. thelawdictionary.org
  24. That which incites to action; anything prompting or exciting to choise, or moving the will; cause; reason; inducement; object; motivation{2}. dictgcide_fs
  25. m[=o]'tiv, adj. causing motion: having power to cause motion.--n. that which moves or excites to action: inducement: reason.--v.t. to act on as a motive, instigate.--v.t. M[=O]'TIV[=A]TE, to act on as a motive, induce.--n. MOTIV[=A]'TION.--adj. M[=O]TIVELESS.--ns. M[=O]'TIVELESSNESS; M[=O]'TIVE-POWER, or -FORCE, the force acting upon a body so as to cause it to move; MOTIV'ITY, power of producing motion: the quality of being influenced by motion. [Fr., through Low L., from mov[=e]re, m[=o]tum to move.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  26. Tending to initiate movement, whence motivity n.; m. power, moving or impelling power, esp. form of mechanical energy used to drive machinery, e.g. steam, electricity; concerned with movement; (n.) what induces a person to act, e.g. desire, fear, circumstance, whence motiveless a.; =Motif. [French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  27. n. That which incites to action; any thing moving the will; - reason; cause; constraining influence. Cabinet Dictionary

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