Spellcheck.net

Definitions of salt

  1. white crystalline form of especially sodium chloride used to season and preserve food Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. the taste experience when salt is taken into the mouth Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. add salt to Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. negotiations between the US and the USSR opened in 1969 in Helsinki designed to limit both countries' stock of nuclear weapons Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. (rare; of speech) painful; bitter; "salt scorn"- Shakespeare; "a salt apology" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. containing or filled with salt; "salt water" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. one of the four basic taste sensations; like the taste of sea water Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. preserve with salt, as of meats Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. (used especially of meats) preserved in salt Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. negotiations between the United States and the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics opened in 1969 in Helsinki designed to limit both countries' stock of nuclear weapons Wordnet Dictionary DB
  11. a compound formed by replacing hydrogen in an acid by a metal (or a radical that acts like a metal) Wordnet Dictionary DB
  12. preserve with salt; "people used to salt meats on ships" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  13. add zest or liveliness to; "She salts her lectures with jokes" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  14. sprinkle as if with salt; "the rebels had salted the fields with mines and traps" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  15. of speech that is painful or bitter; "salt scorn"- Shakespeare; "a salt apology" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  16. The chloride of sodium, a substance used for seasoning food, for the preservation of meat, etc. It is found native in the earth, and is also produced, by evaporation and crystallization, from sea water and other water impregnated with saline particles. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. Hence, flavor; taste; savor; smack; seasoning. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. Hence, also, piquancy; wit; sense; as, Attic salt. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. A dish for salt at table; a saltcellar. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. The neutral compound formed by the union of an acid and a base; thus, sulphuric acid and iron form the salt sulphate of iron or green vitriol. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. Fig.: That which preserves from corruption or error; that which purifies; a corrective; an antiseptic; also, an allowance or deduction; as, his statements must be taken with a grain of salt. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. Any mineral salt used as an aperient or cathartic, especially Epsom salts, Rochelle salt, or Glauber's salt. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. Marshes flooded by the tide. Webster Dictionary DB
  24. Of or relating to salt; abounding in, or containing, salt; prepared or preserved with, or tasting of, salt; salted; as, salt beef; salt water. Webster Dictionary DB
  25. Overflowed with, or growing in, salt water; as, a salt marsh; salt grass. Webster Dictionary DB
  26. Fig.: Bitter; sharp; pungent. Webster Dictionary DB
  27. Fig.: Salacious; lecherous; lustful. Webster Dictionary DB
  28. To sprinkle, impregnate, or season with salt; to preserve with salt or in brine; to supply with salt; as, to salt fish, beef, or pork; to salt cattle. Webster Dictionary DB
  29. To fill with salt between the timbers and planks, as a ship, for the preservation of the timber. Webster Dictionary DB
  30. To deposit salt as a saline solution; as, the brine begins to salt. Webster Dictionary DB
  31. The act of leaping or jumping; a leap. Webster Dictionary DB
  32. Sulphate of magnesia having cathartic qualities; - originally prepared by boiling down the mineral waters at Epsom, England, - whence the name; afterwards prepared from sea water; but now from certain minerals, as from siliceous hydrate of magnesia. Webster Dictionary DB
  33. A sailor; - usually qualified by old. Webster Dictionary DB
  34. Chloride of sodium, used for seasoning, and for the preservation of meat, etc.; obtained from the earth or by the evaporation of sea water; a saltcellar; anything like salt; in chemistry, the compound formed by the action of an acid on a metal or an oxide, replacing the hydrogen of the acid with a metal or a metallic element; wit; colloquially, a sailor. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  35. To sprinkle or season with salt. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  36. Flavored or seasoned with salt. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  37. Saltness. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  38. 1. A compound formed by the interaction of and acid and a base, the hydrogen atoms of the acid being replaced by the atoms of the base. 2. Sodium chloride, NaCl, common salt, table salt. A practical medical dictionary. By Stedman, Thomas Lathrop. Published 1920.
  39. Choride of sodium. An acid compound with a base. Warner's pocket medical dictionary of today. By William R. Warner. Published 1898.
  40. A well-known substance used for seasoning, found either in the earth or obtained by evaporation from sea-water: anything like salt: seasoning: piquancy: (chem.) a combination of an acid with a base. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  41. Containing salt: tasting of salt: overflowed with or growing in salt water: pungent. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  42. To sprinkle, impregnate, or season with salt; as, to salt fish, beef, or pork: to fill with salt between the timbers and planks, as a ship, for the preservation of the timber. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  43. Containing, or tasting like, salt. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  44. Sodium chloride, used for seasoning; piquancy; compound of an acid and a base. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  45. To apply salt to; cure or season with salt. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  46. Flavored with salt; briny; containing salt. saltish; salty. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  47. A compound of chlorin and sodium, abundant in sea-water. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  48. A compound of any base with an acid. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  49. Having the taste of salt; impregnated or abounding with salt; overflowed with or growing among salt; salacious; pungent or bitter; dear. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  50. Chloride of sodium, a substance used for seasoning food, for the preservation of meat, &c.; a body composed of an acid and a base; taste; anything like salt; smack; wit; piquancy; a salter-cellar; a sailor. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  51. To sprinkle, impregnate, or season with salt; to fill with salt. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  52. To deposit salt from a saline substance. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  53. A common culinary substance, obtained from sea-water, salt-springs, and from mines; in chem., called chloride of sodium; a term applied to a combination of an acid with an alkaline base; that which preserves from corruption; figuratively, wit; piquancy. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  54. Having the taste of salt; impregnated with salt. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  55. To season, sprinkle, or impregnate with salt. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  56. Sulphate of magnesia having cathartic qualities; -- originally prepared by boiling down the mineral waters at Epsom, England, -- whence the name; afterwards prepared from sea water; but now from certain minerals, as from siliceous hydrate of magnesia. mso.anu.edu.au
  57. Indispensable as salt is to ourselves, it was even more so to the Hebrews, being to them not only an appetizing condiment in the food both of man, ( Job 11:6 ) and beset, ( Isaiah 30:24 ) see margin, and a valuable antidote to the effects of the heat of the climate on animal food, but also entering largely into the religious services of the Jews as an accompaniment to the various offerings presented on the altar. ( Leviticus 2:13 ) They possessed an inexhaustible and ready supply of it on the southern shores of the Dead Sea. [SEA, THE SALT] There is one mountain here called Jebel Usdum, seven miles long and several hundred feet high, which is composed almost entirely of salt. The Jews appear to have distinguished between rock-salt and that which was gained by evaporation as the Talmudists particularize one species (probably the latter) as the "salt of Sodom." The salt-pits formed an important source of revenue to the rulers of the country, and Antiochus conferred a valuable boon on Jerusalem by presenting the city with 375 bushels of salt for the temple service. As one of the most essential articles of diet, salt symbolized hospitality; as an antiseptic, durability, fidelity and purity. Hence the expression "covenant of salt," ( Leviticus 2:13 ; Numbers 18:19 ; 2 Chronicles 13:5 ) as betokening an indissoluble alliance between friends; and again the expression "salted with the salt of the palace." ( Ezra 4:14 ) not necessarily meaning that they had "maintenance from the palace," as Authorized Version has it, but that they were bound by sacred obligations fidelity to the king. So in the present day, "to eat bread and salt together" is an expression for a league of mutual amity. It was probably with a view to keep this idea prominently before the minds of the Jews that the use of salt was enjoined on the Israelites in their offerings to God. biblestudytools.com
  58. A sailor; -- usually qualified by old. mso.anu.edu.au
  59. used to season food ( Job 6:6 ), and mixed with the fodder of cattle ( Isaiah 30:24 , "clean;" in marg. of RSV "salted"). All meat-offerings were seasoned with salt ( Leviticus 2:13 ). To eat salt with one is to partake of his hospitality, to derive subsistence from him; and hence he who did so was bound to look after his host's interests ( Ezra 4:14 , "We have maintenance from the king's palace;" A.V. marg., "We are salted with the salt of the palace;" RSV, "We eat the salt of the palace"). A "covenant of salt" ( Numbers 18:19 ; 2 Chr 13:5 ) was a covenant of perpetual obligation. New-born children were rubbed with salt ( Ezekiel 16:4 ). Disciples are likened unto salt, with reference to its cleansing and preserving uses ( Matthew 5:13 ). When Abimelech took the city of Shechem, he sowed the place with salt, that it might always remain a barren soil ( Judges 9:45 ). Sir Lyon Playfair argues, on scientific grounds, that under the generic name of "salt," in certain passages, we are to understand petroleum or its residue asphalt. Thus in Genesis 19:26 he would read "pillar of asphalt;" and in Matthew 5:13 , instead of "salt," "petroleum," which loses its essence by exposure, as salt does not, and becomes asphalt, with which pavements were made. The Jebel Usdum, to the south of the Dead Sea, is a mountain of rock salt about 7 miles long and from 2 to 3 miles wide and some hundreds of feet high. biblestudytools.com
  60. A sailor; usually qualified by old. dictgcide_fs
  61. sawlt, n. chloride of sodium, or common salt, a well-known substance used for seasoning, found either in the earth or obtained by evaporation from sea-water: anything like salt: seasoning: piquancy: abatement, modification, allowance: an experienced sailor: that which preserves from corruption: an antiseptic: (chem.) a body composed of an acid and a base united in definite proportions, or of bromine, chlorine, fluorine, or iodine, with a metal or metalloid: (obs.) lust.--v.t. to sprinkle or season with salt: to fill with salt between the timbers for preservation.--adj. containing salt: tasting of salt: overflowed with, or growing in, salt-water: pungent: lecherous: (coll.) costly, expensive--ns. SALT'-BLOCK, a salt-evaporating apparatus; SALT'-BOTT'OM, a flat piece of ground covered with saline efflorescences: SALT'-BUSH, an Australian plant of the goose-foot family; SALT'-CAKE, the crude sodium sulphate occurring as a by-product in the manufacture of hydrochloric acid; SALT'-CAT, a mixture given as a digestive to pigeons; SALT'ER, one who salts, or who makes, sells, or deals in salt, as in Drysalter: a trout leaving salt-water to ascend a stream; SAL'TERN, salt-works; SALT'-FOOT, a large saltcellar marking the boundary between the superior and inferior guests; SALT'-GAUGE, an instrument for testing the strength of brine; SALT'-GLAZE, a glaze produced upon ceramic ware by putting common salt in the kilns after they have been fired.--adj. SALT'-GREEN (Shak.), sea-green.--ns. SALT'-GROUP, a series of rocks containing salt, as the Onondaga salt-group; SALT'-HOLD'ER, a saltcellar; SALT'-HORSE, salted beef; SALT'IE, the salt-water fluke or dab; SALT'ING, the act of sprinkling with salt: the celebration of the Eton 'Montem.'--adj. SALT'ISH, somewhat salt.--adv. SALT'ISHLY, so as to be moderately salt.--ns. SALT'ISHNESS, a moderate degree of saltness; SALT'-JUNK, hard salt beef for use at sea.--adj. SALT'LESS, without salt: tasteless.--n. SALT'-LICK, a place to which animals resort for salt.--adv. SALT'LY.--ns. SALT'-MARSH, land liable to be overflowed by the sea or the waters of estuaries; SALT'-MARSH CAT'ERPILLAR, the hairy larva of an arctiid moth; SALT'-MARSH HEN, a clapper-rail; SALT'-MARSH TERR'APIN, the diamond-backed turtle; SALT'-MINE, a mine where rock-salt is obtained; SALT'NESS, impregnation with salt; SALT'-PAN, a pan, basin, or pit where salt is obtained or made; SALT'-PIT, a pit where salt is obtained; SALT'-RHEUM, a cutaneous eruption; SALTS, Epsom salt or other salt used as a medicine.--adj. SALT'-SLIV'ERED, slivered and salted, as fish for bait.--ns. SALT'-SPOON, a small spoon for serving salt at table; SALT'-SPRING, a brine-spring; SALT'-WA'TER, water impregnated with salt, sea-water; SALT'-WORKS, a place where salt is made; SALT'-WORT, a genus of plants of many species, mostly natives of salt-marshes and sea-shores, one only being found in Britain, the Prickly S., which was formerly burned for the soda it yielded.--adj. SALT'Y (same as SALTISH).--SALT A MINE, to deposit ore in it cunningly so as to deceive persons who inspect it regarding its value; SALT OF LEMON, or SORREL, acid potassium oxalate, a solvent for ink-stains; SALT OF SODA, sodium carbonate; SALT OF TARTAR, a commercial name for purified potassium carbonate; SALT OF VITRIOL, sulphate of zinc; SALT OF WORMWOOD, carbonate of potash.--ABOVE THE SALT, at the upper half of the table, among the guests of distinction; ATTIC SALT, wit; BELOW THE SALT, at the lower half of the table; BE NOT WORTH ONE'S SALT, not to deserve even the salt that gives relish to one's food; BRONZING SALT, used in burning gun-barrels; EPSOM SALTS, magnesium sulphate, a cathartic; ESSENTIAL SALTS, those produced from the juices of plants by crystallisation; GLAUBER'S SALT, or HORSE SALTS, a well-known cathartic, used in woollen dyeing; LAY SALT ON THE TAIL OF, to catch; NEUTRAL SALT, a salt in which the acid and the base neutralise each other; ROCHELLE SALT, sodium potassium tartrate, a laxative; SPIRITS OF SALT, the old name for muriatic or hydrochloric acid; TAKE WITH A GRAIN OF SALT, to believe with some reserve. [A.S. sealt; cf. Ger. salz, also L. sal, Gr. hals.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  62. A name formerly given to a considerable number of substances of very different nature. At present, chymists apply the terra Salts exclusively to the combination of an acid with one or more bases. Neutral salts are those in which the acid and base reciprocally saturate each other. Acid salts or supersalts, (F.) Sur-sels, are those in which the acid predominates over the base. Alkaline salts or subalts, (F.) Sous-sels, those in which the base is, on the contrary, predominant. The different denominations of the salts are compounded, 1. Of the name of the acid; the termination of which is changed into ite, when the name of the acid is in ous;- ate, when it is in ic. Thus the salts formed by the sulphurous acid are sulphites; those by the sulphuric, sulphates 2. This name is followed up by that of the oxyd, which enters into the composition of the salt. Thus, the sulphate of protoxyd of iron is a combination of sulphuric acid with the protoxyd of that metal. Frequently, to shorten the name, the word oxyd is suppressed; and proto, deuto, trito, etc., put before the acid: - as protosulphate of iron. Simple salts are those resulting from the combination of an acid with a single base; double salts with two different bases: triple with three, etc. A haloid salt is one constituted after the type of common salt, or which contains a metal and a salt-radical, as chlorine, iodine, etc. An oxysalt is formed from the combination of an acid with an oxide. When salt is used in an abstract sense, it means the chloride of sodium. Medical Lexicon. A Dictionary of Medical Science
  63. Tasteless Purging, Soda, phosphate of. Medical Lexicon. A Dictionary of Medical Science
  64. [Latin] Any compound of an acid and a base; a compound formed from an acid by the replacement of hydrogen by a base. A neutral (or normal) s. is one in which all, and an acid s. one in which only a part, of the acid hydrogen is replaced; an acid s. being further denoted as monacid, diacid, etc. according as it contains one, two, etc., atoms of unreplaced hydrogen. A basic s. is one containing an excess of the basic element; i.e., is a neutral s. compounded with a basic oxide or hydrate. S’s may be derived from oxygen acids (oxy-s.) or halogen acids (haloid s’s, including the chlorides, bromides, iodides, fluorides, and cyanides). na
  65. [Latin] In pl., S’s, a saline purgative, especially magnesium sulphate (Epsom s.) or sodium and potassium tartrate (Rochelle s.). na
  66. (Often commons.) substance that gives sea-water its characteristic taste got in crystalline forms from strata consisting of it or by evaporation of brine pumped from these or of sea-water& used for seasoning or preserving food& other purposes, sodium chloride, (bay-salt, sea-s., rock-s.; white s., refined for household use from the brownish rock-s.; table s., powdered or easy to powder for the s.-cellar; in s., sprinkled with s. or immersed in brine as preservative; eat s. with, be guest of; eat one\'s s., be his guest or dependant; is not, any one, worth his s., efficient, worth keeping; drop pinch of s. on tail of, capture, w. ref. to directions given children for catching bird; take with a grain of s., regard as exaggerated, be incredulous about, believe only part of; am not made of s., can go out in rain without fear of dissolving; the s. of the earth, people or classes for whose existence the world is better, moral elite, see Matt. v. 13); sting, piquancy, pungency, wit, (no s. in such tears; talk full of s.; attic s.); (old Chem.) solid soluble non-inflammable sapid substance (obs. exc. in some compd names, as s. of lemon or citric acid, Glauber\'s salt, smelling ss., epsom s.); (Chem.) compound of basic& acid radicals, acid with whole or part of its hydrogen replaced by a metal; =s.-cellar (chiefly now in trade use; & hist. in above, below, &c., the s., seated at table among the family& their equals, among the servants& dependants); (also s.-marsh, salting n.) marsh overflowed by sea, often used as pasture or for collecting water for s.-making; (pl.) exceptional rush of sea-water up river; experienced sailor (esp. old s.); salt-cat, mass of s. mixed with gravel, urine, &c., to attract pigeons& keep them at home; salt-cellar[assim. of obs. saler (f. OF salier salt-box f. L as salary) to cellar], vessel holding s. for table use; s.-glaze, glaze on stone-ware made by throwing s. into furnace; s.-lick, place where animals collect to lick earth impregnated with s.; s.-mine, yielding rock-s.; s.-pan, depression near sea, vessel, used for getting s. by evaporation; s.-pit, pit yielding s.; s.-pond, natural or artificial for evaporating sea-water; s.-spoon, usu. with short handle& roundish deep bowl for helping s.; s.-well, bored well yielding brine; s.-works, s. manufactory; saltwort, kinds of maritime& s.-marsh plants; hence saltless, salty, aa., saltiness n. (Adj.) impregnated with, containing, tasting of, cured or preserved or seasoned with, s. (cf. fresh); (of plants) growing in sea or s.-marshes, (of tears, grief, &c.) bitter, afflicting; (of wit &c.) pungent; (of stories, jests, &c.) indecent, spicy; (of bill, charge, &c.; slang) exorbitant; s.-horse naut. slang, s. beef; s. junk; s. water, sea water, tears; s.-water, of, living in, the sea; hence saltish (2) a., saltly adv., saltness n. (Vb) cure or preserve with s. or brine (s. down money or stock slang, put it by); sprinkle (esp. snow to melt it in street) with s.; make s., season, (lit. & fig.); (p.p.; of horses or persons) proof against diseases incident to climate or special conditions by habituation, hardened; treat (esp. paper in Photog.) with solution of s. or mixture of ss.; (Commerc., slang) s. an account &c., put down extreme price for articles, s. the books, represent receipts as larger than they have been; (Mining, slang) s. a mine, introduce extraneous ore &c. to make it seem rich. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  67. Any compound of a base or radical and acid; any compound of an acid only a part of whose replaceable hydrogen atoms have been substituted. American pocket medical dictionary.
  68. In chemistry, a compound produced by the union of an electronegative element or radicle and an electropositive element or radicle. The latter constitutes the basic constituent, and is either a metal or the oxid or hydrate of a metal. The former is the acid constituent, and is either a non-metallic (oxygenic) element or a metal united with a large amount of oxygen. Appleton's medical dictionary.
  69. [L.] Any chemical compound of an acid and a base. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  70. n. [Anglo-Saxon] The chloride of sodium, a substance used for seasoning certain kinds of food and for the preservation of meat, &c.;—that which preserves from corruption;- that which gives flavor or zest;—taste; savour; smack; seasoning;—piquancy; wit;—a salt- cellar;—an old sailor;- a combination of an acid with a base, forming a compound which as properties differing from those of either constituent. Attic salt, wit. Cabinet Dictionary

What are the misspellings for salt?

X