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Definitions of saw

  1. a condensed but memorable saying embodying some important fact of experience that is taken as true by many people Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. a power tool for cutting wood Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. cut with a saw; "saw wood for the fireplace" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. hand tool having a toothed blade for cutting Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. imp. of See. Webster Dictionary DB
  6. Something said; speech; discourse. Webster Dictionary DB
  7. A saying; a proverb; a maxim. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. Dictate; command; decree. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. An instrument for cutting or dividing substances, as wood, iron, etc., consisting of a thin blade, or plate, of steel, with a series of sharp teeth on the edge, which remove successive portions of the material by cutting and tearing. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. To cut with a saw; to separate with a saw; as, to saw timber or marble. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. To form by cutting with a saw; as, to saw boards or planks, that is, to saw logs or timber into boards or planks; to saw shingles; to saw out a panel. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. Also used figuratively; as, to saw the air. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. To use a saw; to practice sawing; as, a man saws well. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. To cut, as a saw; as, the saw or mill saws fast. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. To be cut with a saw; as, the timber saws smoothly. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. of See Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  17. A cutting tool with a thin, flat blade and a toothed edge; a proverb or wise saying. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  18. To cut with, or as with, a thin-bladed tool with a toothed edge; to form or fashion with such a tool; to make motions like those of such a tool in operation; as, he sawed the air with his hands and arms. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  19. To be cut with such a tool; to use such a tool. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  20. Sawer. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  21. Sawed. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  22. Sawed or sawn. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  23. Sawing. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  24. An instrument having an edge of sharp tooth-like projections; employed in surgery for cutting bone. A practical medical dictionary. By Stedman, Thomas Lathrop. Published 1920.
  25. An instrument with nicked edge for sawing a bone. Warner's pocket medical dictionary of today. By William R. Warner. Published 1898.
  26. Pa.t. of SEE. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  27. An instrument for cutting, formed of a blade, band, or disc of thin steel, with a toothed edge. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  28. To cut with a saw. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  29. To use a saw: to be cut with a saw:-pa.t. sawed; pa.p. sawed or sawn. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  30. A saying: a proverb. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  31. Of to see. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  32. To use, or cut with, a saw. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  33. Toothed instrument for cutting; an old saying. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  34. To cut, shape, or fashion with a saw. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  35. To be cut with a saw; use a saw; make motions as if using a saw. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  36. Imp. Of SEE, v. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  37. A cutting instrument with pointed teeth. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  38. A proverbial saying. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  39. A cutting instrument of steel with a toothed edge. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  40. A saying or maxim. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  41. To cut with a saw; to separate with a saw; to form by cutting with a saw. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  42. To practise sawing; to cut with a saw; to be cut with a saw. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  43. A cutting instrument with a toothed edge. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  44. To cut or separate with the saw; to use a saw. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  45. Of see, which see. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  46. Egyptian saws, so far as has yet been discovered, are single-handed. As is the case in modern Oriental saws, the teeth usually incline toward the handle, instead of away from it like ours. They have, in most cases, bronze blades, apparently attached to the handles by leathern thongs. No evidence exists of the use of the saw applied to stone in Egypt, but we read of sawn stones used in the temple. ( 1 Kings 7:9 ) The saws "under" or "in" which David is said to have placed his captives were of iron. The expression in ( 2 Samuel 12:31 ) does not necessarily imply torture, but the word "cut" in ( 1 Chronicles 20:3 ) can hardly be understood otherwise. biblestudytools.com
  47. saw, pa.t. of see. gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  48. saw, n. an instrument for cutting, formed of a blade, band, or disc of thin steel, with a toothed edge.--v.t. to cut with a saw.--v.i. to use a saw: to be cut with a saw:--pa.t. sawed; pa.p. sawed or sawn.--ns. SAW'-BACK, the larva of an American bombycid moth; SAW'-BONES, a slang name for a surgeon; SAW'DUST, dust or small pieces of wood, &c., made in sawing; SAW'ER; SAW'-FILE, a three-cornered file used for sharpening the teeth of saws; SAW'-FISH, a genus of cartilaginous fishes distinguished by the prolongation of the snout into a formidable weapon bordered on each side by sharp teeth; SAW'-FLY, the common name of a number of hymenopterous insects, injurious to plants; SAW'-FRAME, the frame in which a saw is set; SAW'-GRASS, a marsh plant of the southern states of the American Union, with long slender leaves; SAW'-HORN, any insect with serrate antennæ; SAW'MILL, a mill for sawing timber; SAW'PIT, a pit where wood is sawed; SAW'-SET, an instrument for turning the teeth of saws alternately right and left; SAW'-SHARP'ENER, the greater titmouse; SAW'-T[=A]'BLE, the platform of a sawing-machine; SAW'-TEM'PERING, the process by which the requisite hardness and elasticity are given to a saw.--adj. SAW'-TOOTHED, having teeth like those of a saw: (bot.) having tooth-like notches, as a leaf.--ns. SAW'-WHET, the Acadian owl; SAW'-WHET'TER, the marsh titmouse; SAW'YER, one who saws timber: a stranded tree in a river in America: any wood-boring larva: the bowfin fish. [A.S. saga; Ger. säge.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  49. saw, n. a saying: a proverb: a degree: a joke. [A.S. sagu--secgan, to say.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  50. saw, n. (Scot.) salve. gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  51. A surgical instrument, made like a common saw; and used for sawing the bones in amputations, or for removing exostoses, Ac. Saws of different sizes and shapes are used in surgery. The crown of the trepan is nothing more than a species of circular saw. Medical Lexicon. A Dictionary of Medical Science
  52. (p.p. sawn, rarely sawed). Implement usu. of steel worked by hand or mechanically& with variously shaped blade or edge having teeth of various forms cut in or attached to it for dividing wood, metal, stone, &c., by reciprocating or rotatory motion (annular, crown, cylinder, s., cylinder with toothed edge for making circular hole; band, bow, circular, frame, fret, s.; cross-cut, rip, s., for cutting wood across, along, the grain; hand-s., held with one hand; jig-s., frame-s. worked mechanically in connexion with table holding the wood &c. (j.-s. puzzle, of pieces sawn with j.-s. to be put together); pit-s., worked by two men one above& one in pit; reciprocating s., worked mechanically with backward& forward strokes; stone-s., toothless frame-s. cutting stone by friction with sand& water); (Zool. &c.) serrated organ or part; s.-doctor, machine for making teeth of s.; sawdust, wood fragments produced in sawing used in packing, pugging, stuffing, drying moisture, &c. (let the s.-d. out of fig., expose pretentiousness or unsubstantial character of, w. ref. to doll\'s stuffing); s.-fish, large kind with toothed snout used as weapon; s.-fly, kinds injurious to plants with serrated ovipositor; s.-frame, in which s.-blade is held taut; s.-gate, s.-frame; s.-gin, cotton-gin with s.-teeth; s.-horse, rack supporting wood for sawing; s.-mill, driven by water or steam for mechanical sawing; s.-pit, in which lower of two men working pit-s. stands; s.-set, tool for wrenching s.-teeth in alternate directions to give kerf wider than blade& let s. work freely; s.-wort, plant yielding yellow dye named from serrated leaves; s.-wrack, a serrated seaweed; s.-wrest, s.-set. (Vb) cut (wood &c.) with, make (boards &c.) with, use, s.; move (t. & i.) backward& forward, divide (the air &c.), with motion as of s. or person sawing; (quasi-pass.) admit of being sawn easily, badly, &c.; (Bookbind.) make incisions to receive binding-bands in (gathered sheets); sawbones slang, surgeon. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  53. Proverbial saying, old maxim, (usu. old or wise s.). [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  54. See see Concise Oxford Dictionary
  55. hack-s., metal-cutting s. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  56. Cutting instrument with a toothed or serrated edge. American pocket medical dictionary.
  57. n. [Anglo-Saxon, French] An instrument for cutting, consisting of a thin blade or plate of steel, with a series of sharp teeth on one edge. Circular-saw, a disk of steel with saw-teeth upon its periphery, and revolved on an arbour. Cabinet Dictionary
  58. n. [Anglo Saxon ,German] A saying; sentence; maxim; proverb. Cabinet Dictionary
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