Spellcheck.net

Definitions of trip

  1. put in motion or move to act; "trigger a reaction"; "actuate the circuits" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. get high, stoned, or drugged; "He trips every weekend" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. make a trip for pleasure Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. an unintentional but embarrassing blunder; "he recited the whole poem without a single trip"; "confusion caused his unfortunate misstep" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. an accidental misstep threatening (or causing) a fall; "he blamed his slip on the ice"; "the jolt caused many slips and a few spills" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. cause to stumble Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. a light or nimble tread; "he heard the trip of women's feet overhead" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. a journey for some purpose (usually including the return); "he took a trip to the shopping center" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. a catch mechanism that acts as a switch; "the pressure activates the tripper and releases the water" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. a hallucinatory experience induced by drugs; "an acid trip" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. an unintentional but embarrassing blunder; "he recited the whole poem without a single trip"; "he arranged his robes to avoid a trip-up later"; "confusion caused his unfortunate misstep" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  12. an exciting or stimulting experience Wordnet Dictionary DB
  13. miss a step and fall or nearly fall; "She stumbled over the tree root" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  14. cause to stumble; "The questions on the test tripped him up" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  15. To make a brief journey or pleasure excursion; as, to trip to Europe. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. To take a quick step, as when in danger of losing one's balance; hence, to make a false; to catch the foot; to lose footing; to stumble. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. Fig.: To be guilty of a misstep; to commit an offense against morality, propriety, or rule; to err; to mistake; to fail. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. Fig.: To overthrow by depriving of support; to put an obstacle in the way of; to obstruct; to cause to fail. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. To detect in a misstep; to catch; to convict. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. To raise (an anchor) from the bottom, by its cable or buoy rope, so that it hangs free. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. To pull (a yard) into a perpendicular position for lowering it. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. To release, let fall, or see free, as a weight or compressed spring, as by removing a latch or detent. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. A quick, light step; a lively movement of the feet; a skip. Webster Dictionary DB
  24. A brief or rapid journey; an excursion or jaunt. Webster Dictionary DB
  25. A false step; a stumble; a misstep; a loss of footing or balance. Fig.: An error; a failure; a mistake. Webster Dictionary DB
  26. A small piece; a morsel; a bit. Webster Dictionary DB
  27. A stroke, or catch, by which a wrestler causes his antagonist to lose footing. Webster Dictionary DB
  28. A single board, or tack, in plying, or beating, to windward. Webster Dictionary DB
  29. A herd or flock, as of sheep, goats, etc. Webster Dictionary DB
  30. A troop of men; a host. Webster Dictionary DB
  31. A flock of widgeons. Webster Dictionary DB
  32. To move with light, quick steps; to walk or move lightly; to skip; to move the feet nimbly; - sometimes followed by it. See It, 5. Webster Dictionary DB
  33. To cause to stumble, or take a false step; to cause to lose the footing, by striking the feet from under; to cause to fall; to throw off the balance; to supplant; - often followed by up; as, to trip up a man in wrestling. Webster Dictionary DB
  34. To run or step lightly or nimbly; take short, quick steps; to skip; to make a misstep; to stumble; as, to trip over a board; to make a mistake or error, mentally or morally; as, he tripped in giving his answer. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  35. To execute with light, agile steps, as a dance; to cause to stumble; as, the loose board tripped him so that he fell; to cause to halt by getting in the way of; to catch in a mistake or deception; in machinery, to set free, as by pulling a catch, trigger, etc. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  36. A quick, short step; a misstep or false step; mistake; journey or excursion; in machinery, a device that releases. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  37. Tripped. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  38. Tripping. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  39. To move with short, light steps: to stumble and fall: to err: to fail. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  40. To cause to stumble by striking one's feet from under him: to overthrow by taking away support: to catch:-pr.p. tripping; pa.t. and pa.p. tripped. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  41. A light, short step: a catch by which an antagonist is thrown: a false step: a mistake: a short voyage or journey. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  42. A tripping step; excursion; catch which causes a fall; stumble; error. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  43. To cause to stumble or fall. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  44. To step lightly and quickly; to stumble; err. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  45. To cause (one) to lose balance, stumble, or fall. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  46. To perform (a dance) lightly or nimbly. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  47. Mech. To free; release, as a catch. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  48. To move with light and nimble steps. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  49. To stumble; err. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  50. A short journey; excursion. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  51. A stumble; blunder. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  52. A nimble step. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  53. A light short step; a brief journey or voyage; a stroke or catch by which a wrestler supplants his antagonist; a false step; a stumble; a mistake; a slight error arising from haste; a single board in plying to windward. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  54. To cause to fall by striking the feet suddenly from under the person; to overthrow; to catch; to detect. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  55. To run or step lightly; to stumble; to strike the foot against something, so as to stumble and fall; to err; to fail. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  56. To run or step lightly or nimbly; to take short quick steps; to strike the foot against something so as to cause to fall or stumble; a false step; to cause to fall by striking the feet suddenly from under the person, with up, as "to trip up"; to overthrow or supplant; to fail; to err. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  57. A stumble or fall by striking the foot againt an objeet; a stroke or catch in wrestling; a failure; a mistake; a slight error; a journey or excursion; a short voyage or journey. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  58. To move with light, quick steps; to walk or move lightly; to skip; to move the feet nimbly; -- sometimes followed by it. See It, 5. mso.anu.edu.au
  59. To cause to stumble, or take a false step; to cause to lose the footing, by striking the feet from under; to cause to fall; to throw off the balance; to supplant; -- often followed by up; as, to trip up a man in wrestling. mso.anu.edu.au
  60. To move with light, quick steps; to walk or move lightly; to skip; to move the feet nimbly; sometimes followed by it. See It, 5. dictgcide_fs
  61. To take a quick step, as when in danger of losing one's balance; hence, to make a false step; to catch the foot; to lose footing; to stumble. dictgcide_fs
  62. To cause to stumble, or take a false step; to cause to lose the footing, by striking the feet from under; to cause to fall; to throw off the balance; to supplant; often followed by up; as, to trip up a man in wrestling. dictgcide_fs
  63. To overthrow by depriving of support; to put an obstacle in the way of; to obstruct; to cause to fail. dictgcide_fs
  64. To detect in a misstep; to catch; to convict; also called trip up. dictgcide_fs
  65. To release, let fall, or set free, as a weight or compressed spring, as by removing a latch or detent; to activate by moving a release mechanism, often unintentionally; as, to trip an alarm. dictgcide_fs
  66. trip, v.i. to move with short, light steps: to stumble and fall: to err, to go wrong, to make a slip in chastity: to fail.--v.t. to cause to stumble by striking one's feet from under him (with up): to overthrow by taking away support: to catch: to catch in a fault: to loosen, as an anchor, from the bottom, by a long rope: to turn, as a yard, from a horizontal to a vertical position: to fold in the middle, as a deep stage-drop: to strike against:--pr.p. trip'ping; pa.t. and pa.p. tripped.--n. a light, short step: a catch by which an antagonist is thrown: one of the points in coursing, when the hare is thrown off its legs: a false step: a mistake: a short voyage or journey, a jaunt.--ns. TRIP'-BOOK, a book in which the records and accounts of the trip of a fishing-boat are made up and kept: TRIP'-HAMM'ER, a large hammer used in forges, a tilt-hammer; TRIP'PER, a cheap excursionist, a tourist doing a certain round: one who stumbles or who makes another stumble; TRIP'-SLIP (U.S.), a strip of paper on which a car-conductor must punch a hole when a fare is taken. [M. E. trippen; cog. with Dut. trippen, trappen, to tread upon, trippelen, to trip, Sw. trippa, to trip.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  67. Walk or dance with quick light tread, (fig., of rhythm &c.) run lightly, whence trippingly adv.; (archaic) take journey or excursion, whence (in mod. use) tripper n.; make false step, stumble, (often over obstacle); make mistake, commit inconsistency or inaccuracy or moral delinquency, as caught him tripping in his dates, all apt to t.; (of person or obstacle) cause (person) to stumble by entangling or suddenly arresting his feet (often up); detect (person) in blunder (often up); (Naut.) loose (anchor) from bottom by means of cable, turn (yard &c.) from horizontal to vertical position; release (part of machine) suddenly by withdrawing catch &c. (N.) journey, voyage, excursion, as round t. (to a place& back), cheap tt. to the Riviera; nimble step; stumble (lit. & fig.); tripping or being tripped up; the fish caught during a voyage; t.-hammer, kind of TILT hammer. [old French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  68. n. A quick, light step; a skip; –a brief journey or voyage; an excursion or jaunt; –a false step; a misstep; a loss of footing or balance; –a slight error; a failure; a mistake; –a stroke or catch by which a wrestler supplants his antagonist. Cabinet Dictionary

What are the misspellings for trip?

X