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Definitions of wall

  1. an embankment built around a space for defensive purposes; "they stormed the ramparts of the city"; "they blew the trumpet and the walls came tumbling down" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. surround with a wall in order to fortify Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. (anatomy) a layer (a lining or membrane) that encloses a structure; "stomach walls" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. an architectural partition with a height and length greater than its thickness; used to divide or enclose an area or to support another structure; "the south wall had a small window"; "the walls were covered with pictures" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. a masonry fence (as around an estate or garden); "the wall followed the road"; "he ducked behind the garden wall and waited" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. a layer of material that encloses space; "the walls of the cylinder were perforated"; "the container's walls were blue" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. anything that suggests a wall in structure or effect; "a wall of water"; "a wall of smoke"; "a wall of prejudice" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. a vertical (or almost vertical) smooth rock face (as of a cave or mountain) Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. a difficult or awkward situation; "his back was to the wall"; "competition was pushing them to the wall" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. anything that suggests a wall in structure or function or effect; "a wall of water"; "a wall of smoke"; "a wall of prejudice"; "negotiations ran into a brick wall" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  11. A kind of knot often used at the end of a rope; a wall knot; a wale. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. A work or structure of stone, brick, or other materials, raised to some height, and intended for defense or security, solid and permanent inclosing fence, as around a field, a park, a town, etc., also, one of the upright inclosing parts of a building or a room. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. A defense; a rampart; a means of protection; in the plural, fortifications, in general; works for defense. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. An inclosing part of a receptacle or vessel; as, the walls of a steam-engine cylinder. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. The side of a level or drift. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. The country rock bounding a vein laterally. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. To inclose with a wall, or as with a wall. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. To defend by walls, or as if by walls; to fortify. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. To close or fill with a wall, as a doorway. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. A solid fence of stone, brick, etc.; the outside structure which incloses a building; a partition forming the side of a room; a structure for defense; means of protection. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  21. To surround with, or as with, a structure for inclosure, security, or defense. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  22. Paries, an investing part enclosing a cavity such as the chest or abdomen. A practical medical dictionary. By Stedman, Thomas Lathrop. Published 1920.
  23. An erection of brick, stone, etc., for a fence or security: the side of a building: (fig.) defence, means of security:-pl. fortifications. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  24. To inclose with or as with a wall: to defend with walls. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  25. Fence of brick or stone: side of a building. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  26. To inclose with, or as with, a wall; fortify. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  27. To provide with a wall; enclose; fortify; defend. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  28. A continuous structure, as for the side of a house, vessel, etc.; also, a fence of stone or masonry. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  29. Fortifications in general. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  30. A work or structure of stone, brick, or other material, intended for defence or secrecy; the side of a building or apartment; a defence or means of security. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  31. To inclose with or defend by a wall. To go to the wall, to get the worst of it. To take the wall, to take the upper or most honourable place. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  32. An erection of stone, brick, or other material, raised to some height, and in- tended for purposes of security or inclosure. In law, this term occurs in such compounds WALL 1217 WARD as "ancient wall," "party-wail," "division- wall," etc. thelawdictionary.org
  33. Cities were surrounded by walls, as distinguished from "unwalled villages" ( Ezekiel 38:11 ; Leviticus 25:29-34 ). They were made thick and strong ( Numbers 13:28 ; Deuteronomy 3:5 ). Among the Jews walls were built of stone, some of those in the temple being of great size ( 1 Kings 6:7 ; 7:9-12 ; 20:30 ; Mark 13:1 Mark 13:2 ). The term is used metaphorically of security and safety ( Isaiah 26:1 ; 60:18 ; Revelation 21:12-20 ). (See FENCE .) biblestudytools.com
  34. wawl, n. an erection of brick, stone, &c. for a fence or security: the side of a building: (fig.) defence, means of security: in mining, one of the surfaces of rock enclosing the lode: (anat.) a paries or containing structure or part of the body: (pl.) fortifications.--v.t. to enclose with, or as with, a wall: to defend with walls: to hinder as by a wall.--n. WALL'-CLOCK, a clock hung on a walk.--adj. WALLED, fortified.--ns. WALL'ER, one who builds walls; WALL'-FLOWER, a plant with fragrant yellow flowers, found on old walls: a woman at a ball who keeps her seat, presumably for want of a partner--applied sometimes to men; WALL'-FRUIT, fruit growing on a wall; WALL'ING, walls collectively: materials for walls; WALL'-KNOT, a nautical method of tying the end of a rope.--adj. WALL'-LESS.--ns. WALL'-LIZ'ARD, -NEWT, a gecko; WALL'-MOSS, the yellow wall-lichen: the stone-crop; WALL'-PAINT'ING, the decoration of walls with ornamental painted designs; WALL'-P[=A]'PER, paper usually coloured and decorated, for pasting on the walls of a room; WALL'-PIECE, a gun mounted on a wall; WALL'-PLATE, a horizontal piece of timber on a wall, under the ends of joists, &c.; WALL'-SPACE (archit.), a plain expanse of wall; WALL'-SPRING, a spring of water running between stratified rocks; WALL'-TOW'ER, a tower built into and forming part of a line of fortification or a fortified city-wall; WALL'-TREE, a tree trained against a wall; WALL'-WORT, the European dwarf elder; HANG'ING-WALL, that wall of the vein which is over the miner's head while working, the opposite wall being called the FOOT'-WALL.--WALL A ROPE, to make a wall-knot on the end of a rope.--DRIVE TO THE WALL, to push to extremities; GO TO THE WALL, to be hard pressed: to be pushed to extremes; HANG BY THE WALL, to hang up neglected: to remain unused; PUSH, or THRUST, TO THE WALL, to force to give place; THE WALL, the right of taking the side of the road near the wall when encountering another person, as in the phrase to GIVE, or TAKE, THE WALL. [A.S. weall, wall; Ger. wall, both from L. vallum, a rampart--vallus, a stake.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  35. Continuous& usu. vertical& solid structure of stones, bricks, concrete, timber, &c., narrow in proportion to length& height serving to enclose (partly) or protect or divide off town, house, room, field, &c., surface of inner side (s) of room, (party or partition w., separating two rooms, houses, fields, &c.; w. of partition fig., line of division, gulf; blank w., without door or gate or window, also without decoration; run one\'s head against a w., attempt impossibilities; see through brick w., have miraculous insight; ww. have ears, eavesdroppers are or may be about; with one\'s back to the w., brought to bay, fighting alone against odds; retaining w.); something resembling w. in appearance or effect (mountain-w., line of steep hills; w. of armed men, fire, bayonets, protection or obstacle consisting of these; cell-w., ww. of the chest, &c., enclosing tissue or framework in Bot. or Anat.; hanging, foot, -w., in mining, upper, lower, rock enclosing lode); (position next) w. as opp. kennel side of street footpath (give one the w., allow him cleaner part in passing; take the w. of, refuse this courtesy to); side as opp. centre of road (the weakest goes to the w., is pushed aside, gets the worst in competition); w.-creeper, kinds of bird; w.-cress, kinds of plant growing in stony places; w.-fern, common polypody; wallflower, fragrant spring garden-plant with usu. orange or brown clustered flowers; w.-fruit, of trees fastened against w. for protection& warmth; w.-painting, on w. usu. of room, esp. fresco; w.-paper, for pasting over room-ww., usu. with decorative printed patterns; w.-pepper, kind of stone-crop; w.-plate, timber laid in or on wall to distribute pressure of girder &c.; w.-rue, small fern growing on ww. & cliffs; w.-washer, plate used with tie-rod in supporting shaky w.; hence wall-less a. (Vb) provide or protect with w. (esp. in p.p., as walled towns); block up aperture &c. with w. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  36. wallflower, (also,colloq.) woman sitting out dances for lack of partners. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  37. An inclosing or limiting structure. Appleton's medical dictionary.
  38. n. [Anglo-Saxon, Latin]A solid and permanent inclosing fence, as around a field, a park, a town, or the like ; also, one of the upright inclosing parts of a building or room ;—pl. Fortifications in general ; works for defence ;- hence, a defence ; means of security and protection. Cabinet Dictionary

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