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Definitions of dog

  1. metal supports for logs in a fireplace; "the andirons were too hot to touch" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. someone who is morally reprehensible; "you dirty dog" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. a member of the genus Canis (probably descended from the common wolf) that has been domesticated by man since prehistoric times; occurs in many breeds; "the dog barked all night" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. a hinged catch that fits into a notch of a ratchet to move a wheel forward or prevent it from moving backward Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. informal term for a man; "you lucky dog" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. a dull unattractive unpleasant girl or woman; "she got a reputation as a frump"; "she's a real dog" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. a smooth-textured sausage of minced beef or pork usually smoked; often served on a bread roll Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. go after with the intent to catch; "The policeman chased the mugger down the alley"; "the dog chased the rabbit" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  9. A quadruped of the genus Canis, esp. the domestic dog (C. familiaris). Webster Dictionary DB
  10. A mean, worthless fellow; a wretch. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. One of the two constellations, Canis Major and Canis Minor, or the Greater Dog and the Lesser Dog. Canis Major contains the Dog Star (Sirius). Newage Dictionary DB
  12. An iron for holding wood in a fireplace; a firedog; an andiron. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. A grappling iron, with a claw or claws, for fastening into wood or other heavy articles, for the purpose of raising or moving them. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. An iron with fangs fastening a log in a saw pit, or on the carriage of a sawmill. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. A piece in machinery acting as a catch or clutch; especially, the carrier of a lathe, also, an adjustable stop to change motion, as in a machine tool. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. To hunt or track like a hound; to follow insidiously or indefatigably; to chase with a dog or dogs; to worry, as if by dogs; to hound with importunity. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. A fellow; - used humorously or contemptuously; as, a sly dog; a lazy dog. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. One of the two constellations, Canis Major and Canis Minor, or the Greater and the Lesser Dog. Canis Major contains the Star (Sirius). Webster Dictionary DB
  19. An intelligent and affectionate domestic animal of the wolf kind; any of various mechanical contrivances. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  20. To follow like a hound; as, he dogged their steps. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  21. Doggish. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  22. Dogged. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  23. Dogging. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  24. A domestic quadruped: a term of contempt: one of two constellations of stars: an andiron: an iron hook for holding logs of wood. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  25. To follow as a dog: to follow and watch constantly: to worry with importunity:-pr.p. dogging; pa.p. dogged'. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  26. DOGGER. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  27. A domestic quadruped; andiron. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  28. To follow continually. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  29. To follow closely; hound; hunt. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  30. A carnivorous mammal, commonly domesticated, and remarkable for its intelligence and its attachment to man. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  31. A catch or detent; implement. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  32. In composition, male; degenerate. To give or throw to the dogs, to throw away. To go to the dogs, to go to ruin. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  33. A well-known domestic animal of the genus canis; a term of contempt given to a man; one or two constellations in the southern hemisphere; aliandiron; an iron book or bar with a sharp fang, used by sawyers to fasten a log of timber in a saw-pit. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  34. To follow as a dog; to follow close and constantly; to worry with importunity. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  35. A well-known domestic animal; a man, in reproach; an iron bar with a sharp fang, used to fasten a log of timber; a name applied to various tools, pieces of machinery, &c, having a curve like the neck of a dog. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  36. To follow insidiously; to hunt or follow closely for a particular purpose. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  37. an animal frequently mentioned in Scripture. It was used by the hebrews as a watch for their houses, ( Isaiah 56:10 ) and for guarding their flocks. ( Job 30:1 ) Then also, as now troops of hungry and semi-wild dogs used to wander about the fields and the streets of the cities, devouring dead bodies and other offal, ( 1 Kings 14:11 ; 1 Kings 21:19 1 Kings 21:23 ; 22:38 ; Psalms 59:6 ) and thus became so savage and fierce and such objects of dislike that fierce and cruel enemies are poetically styled dogs in ( Psalms 22:16 Psalms 22:20 ) moreover the dog being an unclean animal, ( Isaiah 66:3 ) the epithets dog, dead dog, dogs head, were used as terms of reproach or of humility in speaking of ones self. ( 1 Samuel 24:14 ; 2 Samuel 3:8 ; 9:8 ; 16:9 ; 2 Kings 8:13 ) [E] indicates this entry was also found in Easton's Bible Dictionary biblestudytools.com
  38. frequently mentioned both in the Old and New Testaments. Dogs were used by the Hebrews as a watch for their houses ( Isaiah 56:10 ), and for guarding their flocks ( Job 30:1 ). There were also then as now troops of semi-wild dogs that wandered about devouring dead bodies and the offal of the streets ( 1 Kings 14:11 ; 16:4 ; 1 Kings 21:19 1 Kings 21:23 ; 22:38 ; Psalms 59:6 Psalms 59:14 ). As the dog was an unclean animal, the terms "dog," "dog's head," "dead dog," were used as terms of reproach or of humiliation ( 1 Samuel 24:14 ; 2 Sam 3:8 ; 9:8 ; 16:9 ). Paul calls false apostles "dogs" (Phil 3:2 ). Those who are shut out of the kingdom of heaven are also so designated ( Revelation 22:15 ). Persecutors are called "dogs" ( Psalms 22:16 ). Hazael's words, "Thy servant which is but a dog" ( 2 Kings 8:13 ), are spoken in mock humility=impossible that one so contemptible as he should attain to such power. biblestudytools.com
  39. A fellow; -- used humorously or contemptuously; as, a sly dog; a lazy dog. mso.anu.edu.au
  40. An enhanced version of the Unix cat command that,in addition to outputting the contents of files, can outputthe data obtained by fetching URLs. It also offers variousoutput options such as line numbering.Unix manual page: (http://www.penguin-soft.com/penguin/man/1/dog.html). foldoc_fs
  41. dog, n. a domestic quadruped of the same genus as the wolf, and akin to the fox, varying in size from small terriers to huge Newfoundlands, mastiffs, and St Bernards: a mean scoundrel: a term of contempt: a fellow (as a jolly dog): one of two constellations of stars: an andiron: an iron hook for holding logs of wood: a dogfish: a cock, as of a gun.--adj. male (opposed to bitch), as in dog-fox, dog-ape.--v.t. to follow as a dog: to follow and watch constantly: to worry with importunity:--pr.p. dog'ging; pa.p. dogged.--ns. DOG'-BANE, a plant with an intensely bitter root, valued for its medicinal properties, said to be poisonous to dogs; DOG'-BEE, a drone; DOG'-BELT, a broad leather belt round the waist for drawing dans or sledges in the low workings of coal-mines; DOG'-BIS'CUIT, biscuit made for dogs, sometimes containing scraps of meat; DOG'-BOLT (obs.), a contemptible fellow; DOG'-BOX, the part of a railway wagon in which dogs are carried; DOG'-BR[=I]'ER, the brier dogrose; DOG'CART, a two-wheeled carriage with seats back to back, so called from sporting-dogs being originally carried inside the box.--adj. DOG'-CHEAP, very cheap.--n. DOG'-COLL'AR, a collar for dogs: a kind of stiff collar on a woman's dress: a close-fitting clerical collar.--adj. DOG'-FACED.--ns. DOG'-FAN'CIER, one who has a fancy for, or who deals in dogs; DOG'FISH, a popular name for various small species of shark, common on British and American coasts; DOG'-FOX, a male fox; DOG'GER.--adj. DOG'GISH, like a dog: churlish: brutal.--adv. DOG'GISHLY.--n. DOG'GISHNESS.--p.adj. DOG'GONED (vulg.), confounded.--n. DOG'-GRASS, a coarse perennial grass common in uncultivated grounds, akin to couch-grass, dog-wheat, &c.--adjs. DOG'-HEAD'ED; DOG'-HEART'ED.--ns. DOG'-HOLE, a hole fit only for dogs: a mean dwelling; DOG'-HOUSE, -KENN'EL; DOG'-LEECH, one who treats the diseases of dogs; DOG-LETT'ER, the letter or sound r--also Canine letter; DOG'-LOUSE; DOG'-PARS'LEY, fool's parsley; DOG'ROSE, a wild-rose, a brier; DOG'S'-EAR, the corner of the leaf of a book turned down like a dog's ear.--v.t. to turn down the corners of leaves.--p.adjs. DOG'S'-EARED, DOG'-EARED.--ns. DOG'S'-FENN'EL, May-weed; DOG'SHIP, the quality or personality of a dog.--adj. DOG'-SICK.--n. DOG'SKIN, leather made from the skin of a dog, or from sheepskin in imitation of it.--adj. made of such.--ns. DOG'-SLEEP, a light sleep broken by the slightest noise; DOG'S'-MEAT, coarse meat, scraps and refuse sold as food for dogs; DOG'S'-MER'CURY, the mercurialis perennis; DOG'S'-NOSE, a kind of mixed drink; DOG'S'-TAIL-GRASS, a common British pasture grass.--n.pl. DOG'-STONES, a name for various British species of orchis.--ns. DOG'S'-TONGUE, the hound's-tongue plant, Cynoglossum officinale; DOG'-TICK.--adjs. DOG'-TIRED, DOG'-WEA'RY (Shak.), tired as a dog, completely worn out.--ns. DOG'-TRICK, an ill-natured trick; DOG'-TROT, a gentle trot like that of a dog; DOG'-VANE, a small vane of thread, cork, and feathers placed on the weather gunwale to show the direction of the wind; DOG'-V[=I]'OLET, the common name of Viola canina and other scentless species of wild violet; DOG'-WHEAT, a name of DOG-GRASS; DOG'-WHELK, the popular name for univalve molluscs of the genus Nassa; DOG'WOOD, a tree or shrub of the cornel genus, valuable on account of the hardness of the wood.--interj. DOG ON IT! a minced oath (for God damn it!).--GO TO THE DOGS, to be ruined; NOT TO LEAD THE LIFE OF A DOG, to lead a life so wretched that even a dog would not be content with it; THROW, GIVE, or SEND TO THE DOGS, to throw away or abandon. [M. E. doggë; not in A.S.; Dut. dog, a mastiff; Ger. dogge, docke.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  42. Quadruped of many breeds wild& domesticated; hunting-dog (fig., dd. of war, havoc, rapine); male of d., wolf (also. d.-wolf), (fem. Bitch), or fox (also d.-fox); worthless or surly person; fellow (sly, lucky, jolly, d.; SEA-d.); (Astron.) Greater& Lesser D., constellations, also Sirius or Procyon, chief star in either (also d.-star, usu. Sirius; d.-days, hottest part of year in July& Aug., variously dated according to heliacal& cosmical rising of Sirius); kinds of mechanical device for gripping &c.; (pl., also fire-dd.) pair of metal supports for burning wood, or for grate, or for fire-irons; (also sea-d.) light near horizon portending storm; sun-d., parhelion. Phrr.: go to the dd., be ruined; throw to the dd., throw away, sacrifice; not have WORD to throw at d.; every d. has his DAY; love me, love my d., accept my friends as yours; rain CATS& dd.; die like a d., a d.\'s death, miserably, shamefully; take hair of d. that bit you, drink more to cure effects of drink; help lame d. over stile, be friend in need; lead, lead one, a d.\'s life, be worried, worry another; give d. ill name& hang him, of power of nickname or slander; let sleeping dd. lie, let well alone; d. in the manger, one who prevents others\' enjoying what is useless to him; d. in a blanket, rolled currant dumpling or jam pudding. Dogberry, fruit of dogwood. or wild cornel; d.-biscuit, for feeding dd.; d.-box, railway van for dd.; dogcart, two-wheeled driving-cart with cross seats back to back; d.-cheap, very; d.-collar, lit., & fig. of person\'s straight high collar; d.-faced, epithet of kind of babbon; d.-fall, in which wrestlers touch ground together; d.-fennel, Stinking Camomile; d.-fish, kinds of small shark& other fish; d. (\'s)-grass, Couch-grass; d.-hole, -hutch, mean room; d.-latin, incorrect, mongrel; d.-lead, string &c. for leading d.; d.-leg (ged) staircase, going back& forward without well-hole; d.-rose, wild hedge rose; d. (\'s)- ear n. & v.t., corner of page turned down with use, fill (book) with these; d.-shore, prop used in launching; d.-skin, leather of or imitating d. \'s-skin used for gloves; d.-sleep, light& fitful; d. \'s letter, r (f. snarling sound); d. \'s-meat, horse flesh, offal; d. \'s-nose, beer& gin; d. (\'s)-tail, kind of grass; d.\'s-tongue, plants of borage kind; d.\'s-tooth, plant with speckled leaves& flowers; d.-tired, tired out; d.-tooth, small pyramidal ornament esp. in Norman& Early English architecture; d.-violet, scentless kind: d.-watch (Naut.), short half watch of two hours (4-6, 6-8, p.m.); d.-whip, for keeping dd. in order. Hence doggish, dogless, doglike, aa., doggy or doggie, doghood, nn. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  43. Follow closely, pursue, track, (person, his steps; of person or calamity &c.); grip, secure. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  44. The carrier of a lathe. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  45. n. [Icelandic] A quadruped of the genus Canis—there are more than thirty varieties;—a mean worthless fellow;—a constellation called Sirius or Canicula;—an andiron with a dog’s head at top;—a grapping iron;—a kind of catch or cluth. Cabinet Dictionary
  46. A domestick animal remarkably various in his species; a constellation called Sirius, or Canicula, rising and setting with the sun during the dog days; a reproachful name for a man. Complete Dictionary

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