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Definitions of corner

  1. gain control over; "corner the gold market" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. the intersection of two streets; "standing on the corner watching all the girls go by" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. (architecture) solid exterior angle of a building; especially one formed by a cornerstone Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. an interior angle formed be two meeting walls; "a piano was in one corner of the room" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. the point where two lines meet or intersect; "the corners of a rectangle" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. a place off to the side of an area; "he tripled to the rightfield corner"; "he glanced out of the corner of his eye" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. a remote area; "in many corners of the world they still practice slavery" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. the point where three areas or surfaces meet or intersect; "the corners of a cube" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. a projecting part that is corner-shaped; "he knocked off the corners" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. a small concavity Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. a temporary monopoly on a kind of commercial trade; "a corner on the silver market" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  12. force a person or an animal into a position from which he cannot escape Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  13. a predicament from which a skillful or graceful escape is impossible; "his lying got him into a tight corner" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  14. turn a corner; "the car corners" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  15. The point where two converging lines meet; an angle, either external or internal. Newage Dictionary DB
  16. The space in the angle between converging lines or walls which meet in a point; as, the chimney corner. Newage Dictionary DB
  17. An edge or extremity; the part farthest from the center; hence, any quarter or part. Newage Dictionary DB
  18. A secret or secluded place; a remote or out of the way place; a nook. Newage Dictionary DB
  19. Direction; quarter. Newage Dictionary DB
  20. The state of things produced by a combination of persons, who buy up the whole or the available part of any stock or species of property, which compels those who need such stock or property to buy of them at their own price; as, a corner in a railway stock. Newage Dictionary DB
  21. To drive into a corner. Newage Dictionary DB
  22. To drive into a position of great difficulty or hopeless embarrassment; as, to corner a person in argument. Newage Dictionary DB
  23. To get command of (a stock, commodity, etc.), so as to be able to put one's own price on it; as, to corner the shares of a railroad stock; to corner petroleum. Newage Dictionary DB
  24. A free kick from close to the nearest corner flag post, allowed to the opposite side when a player has sent the ball behind his own goal line. Webster Dictionary DB
  25. An angle; the point where two lines, sides, or edges meet; a secluded place; a remote point; as, the corners of the earth. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  26. To drive into some position of difficulty from which there is no escape: corner the market, to buy upstock or property, so as to obtain exclusive control or possession of it. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  27. Cornerwise. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  28. A horn-like projection: the point where two lines meet: a secret or confined place: in speculation, a clique or party formed for the purpose of obtaining possession of the whole or greater part of a particular stock or other species of property, and thus creating a demand for it at high prices. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  29. To place at a disadvantage: to checkmate: also, to create a scarcity of, as of a particular stock or the like, after having obtained command of the supply. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  30. An angle; angular recess; secret or contined place. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  31. To drive into a corner; make a corner in; secure a monopoly of. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  32. An angle; recess; nook. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  33. A position of embarrassment or difficulty; the securing of a monopoly in the market with control of price. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  34. The point where two converging lines meet; an angle; an enclosed place; a secret or retired place; a clique who unite to buy up stock or the supply of an article in order to raise the price. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  35. To create a scarcity by securing the control of the supply; to force into a corner or an untenable position. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  36. The small space at the point where two lines meet; an angle; a small confined part of a larger space; a secret or retired place; the end or limit. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  37. The "corner" of the field was not allowed, ( Leviticus 19:9 ) to be wholly reaped. It formed a right of the poor to carry off what was so left, and this was a part of the maintenance from the soil to which that class were entitled. Under the scribes, minute legislation fixed one-sixtieth as the portion of a field which was to be left for the legal "corner." The proportion being thus fixed, all the grain might be reaped, and enough to satisfy the regulation subsequently separated from the whole crop. This "corner" was, like the gleaning, tithe-free. [E] indicates this entry was also found in Easton's Bible Dictionary biblestudytools.com
  38. The angle of a house ( Job 1:19 ) or a street ( Proverbs 7:8 ). "Corners" in Nehemiah 9:22 denotes the various districts of the promised land allotted to the Israelites. In Numbers 24:17 , the "corners of Moab" denotes the whole land of Moab. The "corner of a field" ( Leviticus 19:9 ; 23:22 ) is its extreme part, which was not to be reaped. The Jews were prohibited from cutting the "corners," i.e., the extremities, of the hair and whiskers running round the ears ( Leviticus 19:27 ; 21:5 ). The "four corners of the earth" in Isaiah 11:12 and Ezekiel 7:2 denotes the whole land. The "corners of the streets" mentioned in Matthew 6:5 means the angles where streets meet so as to form a square or place of public resort. The corner gate of Jerusalem ( 2 Kings 14:13 ; 2 Chr 26:9 ) was on the north-west side of the city. Corner-stone ( Job 38:6 ; Isaiah 28:16 ), a block of great importance in binding together the sides of a building. The "head of the corner" ( Psalms 118:22 Psalms 118:23 ) denotes the coping, the "coign of vantage", i.e., the topstone of a building. But the word "corner stone" is sometimes used to denote some person of rank and importance ( Isaiah 28:16 ). It is applied to our Lord, who was set in highest honour ( Matthew 21:42 ). He is also styled "the chief corner stone" ( Ephesians 2:20 ; 1 Peter 2:6-8 ). When ( Zechariah 10:4 ), speaking of Judah, says, "Out of him came forth the corner," he is probably to be understood as ultimately referring to the Messiah as the "corner stone." (See TEMPLE, SOLOMON'S.) biblestudytools.com
  39. kor'n[.e]r, n. the point where two lines meet: a secret or confined place: an embarrassing position, difficulty: (obs.) a point in a rubber at whist: a free kick given to the opposite side when a player in football kicks the ball over his own goal-line: an operation by which the whole of a stock or commodity is bought up, so that speculative sellers are compelled to buy, to meet their engagements, at the corner-men's own price.--v.t. to supply with corners: to put in a corner: to put in a fix or difficulty.--adj. COR'NERED, having corners: put in a difficult position.--n. COR'NER-STONE, the stone which unites the two walls of a building at a corner: the principal stone, esp. the corner of the foundation of a building--hence (fig.) something of very great importance.--n.pl. COR'NER-TEETH, the lateral incisors of a horse, above and below.--adv. COR'NER-WISE, with the corner in front: diagonally.--CUT OFF A CORNER, to take a short cut; DONE IN A CORNER, done secretly: DRIVE INTO A CORNER, to put in a fix: to bring to bay; KEEP A CORNER, to reserve a place; THE CORNER (slang), Tattersall's betting-rooms in London, till 1867 at Hyde Park Corner; TURN THE CORNER, to go round the corner: to get past a difficulty; WITHIN THE FOUR CORNERS OF, contained in (of a document, &c.). [O. Fr. corniere--L. cornu.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  40. Place where converging sidesoredges meet; projectingangle, esp. where two streets meet; turn the c., pass round it into another street, (fig.) pass critical point (in illness &c.); cut off a c., avoid it by a short cut; (slang) the c., Tattersall\'s betting-rooms (orig. near Hyde Park C.); hollow angle enclosed by meeting walls &c.; put (child) in the c. (as punishment); (fig.) drive into a c. (difficult position from which there is no escape); secret or remote place, as done in a c., hole-&-c. transactions (underhand); region, quarter, as all the cc. of the earth; (Commerc.) buying up the whole of any stock in the market, so as to compel speculative sellers to buy from one to fulfil their engagements, (loosely) any combination to raise price by securing monopoly; c.-chisel, -punch, &c., (angular, for cutting, cleaning, &c., cc.); c.-stone, one in projecting angle of wall, (fig.) indispensable part, basis; (v.t.) furnish with cc., set in c., drive into c. (esp. fig.), force (dealers) or control (commodity) by means of c.; (v.i.) form c. (in commodity). [old French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  41. c.-man, end man in row of negro minstrels, playing bones or tambourine. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  42. [L. L.] (Stockbrok.) A combination of speculators with a view to influencing prices by getting all available supply of a stock or commodity into a few hands. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  43. n. [Latin] The point where two converging lines meet; an angle; —the space between two converging lines, or walls which meet in a point; —an inclosed, secret or retired place; a nook; a bit of; a part; —an embarrassed position. Cabinet Dictionary
  44. An angle; a secret or remote place; the extremities, the utmost limit. Complete Dictionary

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