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Definitions of fox

  1. be confusing or perplexing to; cause to be unable to think clearly; "These questions confuse even the experts"; "This question completely threw me"; "This question befuddled even the teacher" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. English statesman who supported American independence and the French Revolution (1749-1806) Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. a shifty deceptive person Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. deceive somebody; "We tricked the teacher into thinking that class would be cancelled next week" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. alert carnivorous mammal with pointed muzzle and ears and a bushy tail; most are predators that do not hunt in packs Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. the Algonquian language of the Fox people Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. a member of an Algonquian people formerly living west of Lake Michigan along the Fox River Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. English religious leader who founded the Society of Friends (1624-1691) Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. the gray or reddish-brown fur of a fox Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. become discolored with, or as if with, mildew spots Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. A carnivorous animal of the genus Vulpes, family Canidae, of many species. The European fox (V. vulgaris or V. vulpes), the American red fox (V. fulvus), the American gray fox (V. Virginianus), and the arctic, white, or blue, fox (V. lagopus) are well-known species. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. A sly, cunning fellow. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. To intoxicate; to stupefy with drink. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. To make sour, as beer, by causing it to ferment. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. To repair the feet of, as of boots, with new front upper leather, or to piece the upper fronts of. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. The fox shark or thrasher shark; - called also sea fox. See Thrasher shark, under Shark. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. Rope yarn twisted together, and rubbed with tar; - used for seizings or mats. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. A sword; - so called from the stamp of a fox on the blade, or perhaps of a wolf taken for a fox. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. A tribe of Indians which, with the Sacs, formerly occupied the region about Green Bay, Wisconsin; - called also Outagamies. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. To turn sour; - said of beer, etc., when it sours in fermenting. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. A small animal of the dog kind noted for its cunning; hence, a sly, cunning person. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  22. An animal of the dog family, noted for cunning: any one notorious for cunning. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  23. Wild animal of the dog family; cunning person. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  24. A burrowing canine mammal, noted for its cunning. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  25. A sly, crafty person. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  26. A well-known animal of the dog genus, remarkable for cunning; a sly, cunning fellow; a small strand of rope, made by twisting several ropeyarns together. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  27. To make sour; to repair, as boots. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  28. To turn sour during fermentation. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  29. The European dragonet. Webster Dictionary DB
  30. An animal of the dog kind noted for its cunning; a sly cunning fellow. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  31. The fox shark or thrasher shark; -- called also sea fox. See Thrasher shark, under Shark. mso.anu.edu.au
  32. Rope yarn twisted together, and rubbed with tar; -- used for seizings or mats. mso.anu.edu.au
  33. A sword; -- so called from the stamp of a fox on the blade, or perhaps of a wolf taken for a fox. mso.anu.edu.au
  34. A tribe of Indians which, with the Sacs, formerly occupied the region about Green Bay, Wisconsin; -- called also Outagamies. mso.anu.edu.au
  35. To turn sour; -- said of beer, etc., when it sours in fermenting. mso.anu.edu.au
  36. (Heb. shu'al, a name derived from its digging or burrowing under ground), the Vulpes thaleb, or Syrian fox, the only species of this animal indigenous to Palestine. It burrows, is silent and solitary in its habits, is destructive to vineyards, being a plunderer of ripe grapes (Cant 2:15 ). The Vulpes Niloticus, or Egyptian dog-fox, and the Vulpes vulgaris, or common fox, are also found in Palestine. The proverbial cunning of the fox is alluded to in Ezekiel 13:4 , and in Luke 13:32 , where our Lord calls Herod "that fox." In Judges 15:4 Judges 15:5 , the reference is in all probability to the jackal. The Hebrew word shu'al_ through the Persian _schagal becomes our jackal (Canis aureus), so that the word may bear that signification here. The reasons for preferring the rendering "jackal" are (1) that it is more easily caught than the fox; (2) that the fox is shy and suspicious, and flies mankind, while the jackal does not; and (3) that foxes are difficult, jackals comparatively easy, to treat in the way here described. Jackals hunt in large numbers, and are still very numerous in Southern Palestine. biblestudytools.com
  37. (Heb. shual ). Probably the jackal is the animal signified in almost all the passages in the Old Testament where the Hebrew term occurs. Though both foxes and jackals abound in Palestine, the shualim (foxes) of ( Judges 15:4 ) are evidently jackals and not foxes, for the former animal is gregarious, whereas the latter is solitary in its habits; and Samson could not, for that reason, have easily caught three hundred foxes, but it was easy to catch that number of jackals, which are concealed by hundreds in caves and ruins of Syria. It is not probable, however, that Samson sent out the whole three hundred at once. With respect to the jackals and foxes of Palestine, there is no doubt that the common jackal of the country is the Canis aureus , which may be heard every night in the villages. It is like a medium-sized dog, with a head like a wolf, and is of a bright-yellow color. These beasts devour the bodies of the dead, and even dig them up from their graves. biblestudytools.com
  38. foks, n. an animal of the family Canidæ, genus Vulpes, of proverbial cunning:--fem. VIX'EN: any one notorious for cunning.--ns. FOX'-BAT, a flying-fox, a fruit-bat; FOX'-BRUSH, the tail of a fox; FOX'-EARTH, a fox's burrow.--adj. FOXED, discoloured, spotted.--ns. FOX'-[=E]'VIL, alopecia; FOX'GLOVE, a plant with glove-like flowers, whose leaves are used as a soothing medicine; FOX'HOUND, a hound used for chasing foxes; FOX'-HUNT; FOX'-HUNT'ER; FOX'-HUNT'ING; FOX'INESS, decay: having a harsh, sour taste: state of being spotted, as books; FOX'-SHARK, a large shark of over 12 feet, occasionally seen off British coasts; FOX'SHIP (Shak.), the character of a fox, craftiness; FOX'-TAIL, a genus of grasses, generally characterised by a bushy head; FOX'-TERR'IER, a kind of terrier trained to unearth foxes; FOX'-TRAP, a trap for catching foxes; FOX'-TROT, a pace with short steps, as in changing from trotting to walking.--adj. FOX'Y, of foxes: cunning, suspicious, causing suspicion: (paint.) having too much of the reddish-brown or fox-colour.--FOX AND GEESE, a game played with pieces on a board, where the object is for certain pieces called the geese to surround or corner one called the fox. [A.S. fox; Ger. fuchs.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  39. (fern, vixen, also bitch-f). Red-furred sharp-snouted bushy-tailed quadruped preserved in England as beast of chase& proverbial for cunning; crafty person; northern constellation; Flying f.; f. & geese, game played on board; f.-brush, tail of f.; f.-earth; foxglove, tall purple or white flowered plant; foxhound, kind bred& trained to hunt ff.; f.-hunt n. & v.t., chasing of, chase, f. with hounds, whence foxhunter n.; fox-hunting a. & n., (given to) this sport; foxtail, f.\'s tail, kinds of grass; f.-terrier, short-haired for unearthing ff, but kept chiefly as pets. [German] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  40. Act craftily, dissemble; discolour (leaves of book, engraving, &c.) with brownish spots (esp. in p.p.). Concise Oxford Dictionary
  41. [Heb.] (Bibl.) Includes the jackal. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  42. n. [Anglo-Saxon, Icelandic] An animal of the genus Cunis, with a straight bushy tail, erect ears, and straw-coloured hair—it burrow's in the earth, preys on lambs, poultry, birds, &c., and is remarkable for its cunning;—a sly, cunning fellow;—in nautical language, a small strand of rope made by twisting several rope-yarns together. Cabinet Dictionary
  43. A wild animal of the dog kind remarkable for his cunning; a knave or cunning fellow. Complete Dictionary

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