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Definitions of genesis

  1. a coming into being Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. the first book of the Old Testament: tells of creation; Adam and Eve; the Fall of Man; Cain and Abel; Noah and the flood; God's covenant with Abraham; Abraham and Isaac; Jacob and Esau; Joseph and his brothers Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. The act of producing, or giving birth or origin to anything; the process or mode of originating; production; formation; origination. Webster Dictionary DB
  4. Same as Generation. Webster Dictionary DB
  5. Production. A dictionary of scientific terms. By Henderson, I. F.; Henderson, W. D. Published 1920.
  6. The first book of the Old Testament; - so called by the Greek translators, from its containing the history of the creation of the world and of the human race. Webster Dictionary DB
  7. The act or process of producing or originating beginning: Genesis, the first book of the Old Testament; so called because it tells of the creation of the world. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  8. Generation, procreation, production, origin. A practical medical dictionary. By Stedman, Thomas Lathrop. Published 1920.
  9. Generation, creation, or production: the first book of the Bible, so called from its containing an account of the Creation. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  10. Origin; the first book of the Bible. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  11. The act of originating; creation; origin. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  12. The first book of the Bible. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  13. Act of producing; generation; the first book of the Old Testament; the formation of a line, plane, or solid, by the motion of a point, line, or surface. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  14. The first book of the Old Testament Scriptures, giving the history of the creation of the world and of man, &c.; a production or formation; evolution. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  15. Formation, production, or development of a cell, organ, individual, or species. A dictionary of scientific terms. By Henderson, I. F.; Henderson, W. D. Published 1920.
  16. [Greek] Formation, production, or development of a cell, organ, individual, or species. na
  17. The first book of the Old Testament; -- so called by the Greek translators, from its containing the history of the creation of the world and of the human race. mso.anu.edu.au
  18. The five books of Moses were collectively called the Pentateuch, a word of Greek origin meaning "the five-fold book." The Jews called them the Torah, i.e., "the law." It is probable that the division of the Torah into five books proceeded from the Greek translators of the Old Testament. The names by which these several books are generally known are Greek. The first book of the Pentateuch (q.v.) is called by the Jews Bereshith, i.e., "in the beginning", because this is the first word of the book. It is generally known among Christians by the name of Genesis, i.e., "creation" or "generation," being the name given to it in the LXX. as designating its character, because it gives an account of the origin of all things. It contains, according to the usual computation, the history of about two thousand three hundred and sixty-nine years. Genesis is divided into two principal parts. The first part (1-11) gives a general history of mankind down to the time of the Dispersion. The second part presents the early history of Israel down to the death and burial of Joseph (12-50). There are five principal persons brought in succession under our notice in this book, and around these persons the history of the successive periods is grouped, viz., Adam (1-3), Noah (4-9), Abraham ( (10-25:18), ), Isaac ( (25:19-35:29), ), and Jacob (36-50). In this book we have several prophecies concerning Christ ( 3:15 ; 12:3 ; 18:18 ; 22:18 ; 26:4 ; 28:14 ; 49:10 ). The author of this book was Moses. Under divine guidance he may indeed have been led to make use of materials already existing in primeval documents, or even of traditions in a trustworthy form that had come down to his time, purifying them from all that was unworthy; but the hand of Moses is clearly seen throughout in its composition. biblestudytools.com
  19. (origin ), the first book of the law or Pentateuch, so called from its title ia the Septuagint, that is, Creation . Its author was Moses. The date of writing was probably during the forty-years wanderings in the wilderness, B.C. 1491-1451. Time . --The book of Genesis covered 2369 years,--from the creation of Adam, A.M 1, to the death of Joseph, A.M. 2369, or B.C. 1635. Character and purpose . --The book of Genesis (with the first chapters of Exodus) describes the steps which led to the establishment of the theocracy. It is a part of the writers plan to tell us what the divine preparation of the world was in order to show, first, the significance of the call of Abraham, and next, the true nature of the Jewish theocracy. He begins with the creation of the world, because the God who created the world and the God who revealed himself to the fathers is the same God. The book of Genesis has thus a character at once special and universal. Construction . --It is clear that Moses must have derived his knowledge of the events which he records in Genesis either from immediate divine revelation or from oral tradition or written documents. The nature of many of the facts related, and the minuteness of the narration, render it extremely improbable that immediate revelation was the source from whence they were drawn. That his knowledge should have been derived from oral tradition appears morally impossible when we consider the great number of names, ages, dates and minute events which are recorded. The conclusion then, seems fair that he must have obtained his information from written documents coeval, or nearly so, with the events which they recorded, and composed by persons intimately acquainted with the subjects to which they relate. He may have collected these, with additions from authentic tradition or existing monuments under the guidance of the Holy Spirit, into a single book. Certain it is that several of the first chapters of Genesis have the air of being made up of selections from very ancient documents, written by different authors at different periods. The variety which is observable in the names and titles of the Supreme Being is appealed to among the most striking proofs of this fact. This is obvious in the English translation, but still more so in the Hebrew original. In Gen 1 to 2:3, which is really one piece of composition, as the title, v. 4, "These are the generations," shows, the name of the Most High is uniformly Elohim , God. In ch. ( Genesis 2:4 ) to ch. 3, which may be considered the second document, the title is uniformly Yehovah Elohim, Lord God ; and in the third, including ch. 4, it is Yehovah, Lord , only; while in ch. 5 it is Elohim , God only, except in v. 29, where a quotation is made, and Yehovah used. It is hardly conceivable that all this should be the result of mere accident. The changes of the name correspond exactly to the changes in the narratives and the titles of the several pieces." Now, do all these accurate quotations," says Professor Stowe, "impair the credit of the Mosaic books, or increase it? Is Marshalls Life of Washington to be regarded as unworthy of credit because it contains copious extracts from Washingtons correspondence and literal quotations from important public documents? Is not its value greatly enhanced by this circumstance? The objection is altogether futile. In the common editions of the Bible the Pentateuch occupies about one hundred and fifty pages, of which perhaps ten may be taken up with quotations. This surely is no very large proportion for an historical work extending through so long a period."--Bush. On the supposition that writing was known to Adam, Gen. 1-4, containing the first two of these documents, formed the Bible of Adams descendants, or the antediluvians. Gen 1 to 11:9, being the sum of these two and the following three, constitutes the Bible of the descendants of Noah. The whole of Genesis may be called the Bible of the posterity of Jacob; and the five Books of the Law were the first Bible of Israel as a nation.--Canon Cook. biblestudytools.com
  20. jen'e-sis, n. generation, creation, or production: the first book of the Bible, so called from its containing an account of the Creation:--pl. GEN'ES[=E]S.--adjs. GENES'IAC, -AL, GENESIT'IC, pertaining to Genesis. [L.,--Gr.,--gignesthai, to beget.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  21. [Greek] Production; reproduction; development. na
  22. First book of O.T., with account of the Creation (G-); origin, mode of formation or generation, (also in comb. as abiog., parthenog.). [Latin] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  23. Reproduction; origin. American pocket medical dictionary.
  24. A suffix used in words denoting mode of generation. Appleton's medical dictionary.
  25. The act, mode, or condition of reproduction; generation. Appleton's medical dictionary.
  26. A mode or process of production. Appleton's medical dictionary.
  27. n. [Greek] Act of producing or giving birth or origin; production; formation; origination;—the first book of the Old Testament. Cabinet Dictionary
  28. Generation, the first book of Moses, which treats of production of the whole. Complete Dictionary

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