Spellcheck.net

Definitions of skim

  1. remove from the surface; "skim cream from the surface of milk" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. travel on the surface of water Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. reading or glancing through quickly Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. used of milk and milk products from which the cream has been removed; "yogurt made with skim milk"; "she can drink skimmed milk but should avoid butter" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. read superficially Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. move or pass swiftly and lightly over the surface of Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. coat with a layer; of liquids Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. cause to skip over a surface; "Skip a stone across the pond" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. a thin layer covering the surface of a liquid; "there was a thin skim of oil on the water" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  10. coat (a liquid) with a layer Wordnet Dictionary DB
  11. examine hastily; "She scanned the newspaper headlines while waiting for the taxi" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  12. Skimmed. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  13. To clear (a liquid) from scum or substance floating or lying thereon, by means of a utensil that passes just beneath the surface; as, to skim milk; to skim broth. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. To take off by skimming; as, to skim cream. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. To pass near the surface of; to brush the surface of; to glide swiftly along the surface of. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. Fig.: To read or examine superficially and rapidly, in order to cull the principal facts or thoughts; as, to skim a book or a newspaper. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. To pass lightly; to glide along in an even, smooth course; to glide along near the surface. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. To hasten along with superficial attention. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. To put on the finishing coat of plaster. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. Contraction of Skimming and Skimmed. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. To remove the scum from; to remove something floating from the top of; as, to skim milk; to take off, as cream from milk, with a ladle or spoon; brush the surface of lightly; as, the boat skims the water; to glance over hurriedly. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  22. To pass lightly over a surface; read without thoroughness. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  23. Having the cream, etc., removed from the top; as, skim milk. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  24. Skimming. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  25. To clear off scum: to take off by skimming: to brush the surface of lightly. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  26. To pass over lightly: to glide along near the surface:-pr.p. skimming; pa.t. and pa.p. skimmed. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  27. To take off the upper surface of a fluid; brush the surface of. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  28. To remove (floating matter) from the surface of a liquid. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  29. To move lightly over; glance over superficially. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  30. Scum; the thick matter on the surface of a liquor. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  31. To take of the scum; to take off by skimming; to brush the surface off lightly; to scan superficially. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  32. To pass over lightly; to glide along near the surface; to hurry over superficially. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  33. To take off the scum, thence to move lightly over the surface of a liquid; to clear of scum or floating matter; to pass very near the surface; to glide along; to pass lightly; to glide smoothly. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  34. A Scheme implementation with packages and otherenhancements, by Alain Deutsch et al, France. foldoc_fs
  35. skim, v.t. to clear off scum: to take off by skimming: to brush the surface of lightly.--v.i. to pass over lightly: to glide along near the surface: to become coated over:--pr.p. skim'ming; pa.t. and pa.p. skimmed.--n. the act of skimming: what is skimmed off.--ns. SKIM'MER, a utensil for skimming milk: a bird that skims the water; SKIM'-MILK, skimmed milk: milk from which the cream has been skimmed; SKIM'MING, the act of taking off that which floats on the surface of a liquid, as cream: that which is taken off, scum.--adv. SKIM'MINGLY, by skimming along the surface. [Scum.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  36. Take scum or cream or floating layer from surface of (liquid), take (cream &c.) from surface of liquid, (s. the cream off often fig., take best part of); keep touching lightly or nearly touching (surface) in passing over, (intr.) go thus over or along surface, glide along in air; read (t. & i.) superficially, look over cursorily, gather salient facts contained in; (adj.) s. milk, from which cream has been skimmed. [German] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  37. n. The thick matter that forms on the surface of a liquor;—scum; refuse. Cabinet Dictionary

What are the misspellings for skim?

X