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Definitions of ordinary

  1. lacking special distinction, rank, or status; commonly encountered; "average people"; "the ordinary (or common) man in the street" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. not exceptional in any way especially in quality or ability or size or degree; "ordinary everyday objects"; "ordinary decency"; "an ordinary day"; "an ordinary wine" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. (heraldry) any of several conventional figures used on shields Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. an early bicycle with a very large front wheel and small back wheel Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. a judge of a probate court Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. a clergyman appointed to prepare condemned prisoners for death Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. the expected or commonplace condition or situation; "not out of the ordinary" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. According to established order; methodical; settled; regular. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. Common; customary; usual. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. Of common rank, quality, or ability; not distinguished by superior excellence or beauty; hence, not distinguished in any way; commonplace; inferior; of little merit; as, men of ordinary judgment; an ordinary book. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. An officer who has original jurisdiction in his own right, and not by deputation. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. One who has immediate jurisdiction in matters ecclesiastical; an ecclesiastical judge; also, a deputy of the bishop, or a clergyman appointed to perform divine service for condemned criminals and assist in preparing them for death. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. A judicial officer, having generally the powers of a judge of probate or a surrogate. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. The mass; the common run. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. That which is so common, or continued, as to be considered a settled establishment or institution. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. Anything which is in ordinary or common use. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. A dining room or eating house where a meal is prepared for all comers, at a fixed price for the meal, in distinction from one where each dish is separately charged; a table d'hote; hence, also, the meal furnished at such a dining room. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. A charge or bearing of simple form, one of nine or ten which are in constant use. The bend, chevron, chief, cross, fesse, pale, and saltire are uniformly admitted as ordinaries. Some authorities include bar, bend sinister, pile, and others. See Subordinary. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. According to established custom or rule; usual; commonplace; plain. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  20. Ordinarily. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  21. According to the common order: usual: of common rank: plain: of little merit. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  22. An established judge of ecclesiastical causes: settled establishment: actual office: a bishop: a place where meals are provided at fixed charges. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  23. Ecclesiastical judge; prison chaplain; public table. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  24. Usual; common; inferior. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  25. Common; usual; normal; common place. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  26. That which is usual or common; a public table; an ecclesiastical judge. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  27. According to established order; common; customary; of common rank; inferior; plain; of little merit. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  28. An ecclesiastical judge; a meal; a place of eating; a portion of the escutcheon comprised between straight or other lines. An ordinary seaman, one not fully skilled. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  29. According to established order; customary; usual; of common rank or quality; plain; not handsome; common; of little merit. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  30. An ecclesiastical judge, usually the bishop; a single judge having power to decide cases either with or without a jury; settled establishment; the figures found on a heraldic shield; a dining-place where the prices are fixed; the meal furnished; a name applied to the chaplain of Newgate. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  31. A dining room or eating house where a meal is prepared for all comers, at a fixed price for the meal, in distinction from one where each dish is separately charged; a table d'h Shak. dictgcide_fs
  32. or'di-na-ri, adj. according to the common order: usual: of common rank: plain: of little merit: (coll.) plain-looking.--n. a judge of ecclesiastical or other causes who acts in his own right: something settled or customary: actual office: a bishop or his deputy: a place where regular meals are provided at fixed charges: the common run or mass: (her.) one of a class of armorial charges, called also honourable ordinaries, figures of simple outline and geometrical form, conventional in character--chief, pale, fess, bend, bend-sinister, chevron, cross, saltire, pile, pall, bordure, orle, tressure, canton, flanches.--adv. OR'DINARILY.--ORDINARY OF THE MASS, the established sequence or fixed order for saying mass.--IN ORDINARY, in regular and customary attendance. gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  33. Regular, normal, customary, usual, not exceptional, not above the usual, commonplace, (in o. appended to physician &c., by permanent appointment, not temporary or extraordinary; in an o. way I should refuse, if the circumstances were not exceptional; something out of the o.; o. seaman, abbr. O.S., lower rating than able; in-o. of ships, laid up, not in commission), whence ordinarily adv., ordinariness n.; (authority) having immediate or ex officio& not deputed jurisdiction (the O., archbishop in province, bishop in diocese; O. or Lord O. in Scotland, one of five judges of Court of Session constituting Outer House); rule or book laying down order of divine service; public meal provided at fixed time& price in tavern &c.; (Herald.) charge of earliest, simplest, & commonest kind (esp. chief, pole, bend, fess, bar, chevron, cross, saltire); ungeared bicycle (opp. safety). [Latin] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  34. Was in England the title of a bishop or his deputy acting as an ecclesiastical judge. In the United States, in the colonial period, the colonial governor was ex-officio ordinary, or head of the ecclesiastical courts of the colony, which then had jurisdiction of matrimonial and testamentary causes. In New Jersey the probate judge is still called an ordinary. Dictionary of United States history
  35. [L.] (Eccl.) One who has, in his own right, immediate jurisdiction. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  36. [L.] (Her.) A part of an escutcheon contained by straight or other lines. It is the most ordinary species of charge. The honourable ordinaries are the chief, pale, bend, bend sinister, fess, bar, chevron, cross, saltier (q.v.). The other ordinaries are called subordinate. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  37. [L.] [Leg.) In the Civil Law, a judge empowered to take cognizance of causes in his own right, not by delegation. In Eng. Law, the term is applied to ecclesiastical judges only. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  38. [L.] In the Court of Session in Scotland, a single judge sitting in the outer house to decide causes in the first instance. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  39. n. An officer who has original jurisdiction in his own right, and not by deputation ;— one who has immediate jurisdiction in matters eccleslastical ;— a judicial officer having the powers of a judge of probate or surrogate ;— a dining-room or eating house where there is a fixed price for the meal ; hence, also, the meal furnished at such a dining-room ;— a portion of the escutcheon comprised between straight or other lines. Cabinet Dictionary

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