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Definitions of deep

  1. Extending far below the surface; of great perpendicular dimension (measured from the surface downward, and distinguished from high, which is measured upward); far to the bottom; having a certain depth; as, a deep sea. Webster Dictionary DB
  2. Extending far back from the front or outer part; of great horizontal dimension (measured backward from the front or nearer part, mouth, etc.); as, a deep cave or recess or wound; a gallery ten seats deep; a company of soldiers six files deep. Webster Dictionary DB
  3. Low in situation; lying far below the general surface; as, a deep valley. Webster Dictionary DB
  4. Of penetrating or far-reaching intellect; not superficial; thoroughly skilled; sagacious; cunning. Webster Dictionary DB
  5. Profound; thorough; complete; unmixed; intense; heavy; heartfelt; as, deep distress; deep melancholy; deep horror. Webster Dictionary DB
  6. Strongly colored; dark; intense; not light or thin; as, deep blue or crimson. Webster Dictionary DB
  7. Hard to penetrate or comprehend; profound; - opposed to shallow or superficial; intricate; mysterious; not obvious; obscure; as, a deep subject or plot. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. Muddy; boggy; sandy; - said of roads. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. Of low tone; full-toned; not high or sharp; grave; heavy. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. literary term for an ocean; "denizens of the deep" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. a long steep-sided depression in the ocean floor Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  12. the central and most intense or profound part; "in the deep of night"; "in the deep of winter" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  13. That which is deep, especially deep water, as the sea or ocean; an abyss; a great depth. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. That which is profound, not easily fathomed, or incomprehensible; a moral or spiritual depth or abyss. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. That which extends far downward; a great body of water; an abyss; the culmination; as, the deep of night. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  16. Deepness. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  17. The sea; an abyss. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  18. That which has great depth; an abyss; the sea. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  19. Anything deep, especially the sea; that which is not easily fathomed, or not fathomable; the most still or solemn part. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  20. The sea; the ocean; that which is not easily fathomed. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  21. to far into space; "penetrated deep into enemy territory"; "went deep into the woods"; Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  22. to an advanced time; "deep into the night"; "talked late into the evening" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  23. To a great depth; with depth; far down; profoundly; deeply. Webster Dictionary DB
  24. To a great depth. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  25. difficult to penetrate; incomprehensible to one of ordinary understanding or knowledge; "the professor's lectures were so abstruse that students tended to avoid them"; "a deep metaphysical theory"; "some recondite problem in historiography" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  26. of an obscure nature; "the new insurance policy is written without cryptic or mysterious terms"; "a deep dark secret"; "the inscrutible workings of Providence"; "in its mysterious past it encompasses all the dim origins of life"- Rachel Carson; "rituals totally mystifying to visitors from other lands" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  27. extending relatively far inward; "a deep border" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  28. exhibiting great cunning usually with secrecy; "deep political machinations"; "a deep plot" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  29. strong; intense; "deep purple"; "a rich red" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  30. very distant in time or space; "deep in the past"; "deep in enemy territory"; "deep in the woods"; "a deep space probe" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  31. relatively deep or strong; affecting one deeply; "a deep breath"; "a deep sigh"; "deep concentration"; "deep emotion"; "a deep trance"; "in a deep sleep" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  32. having great spatial extension or penetration downward or inward from an outer surface or backward or laterally or outward from a center; sometimes used in combination; "a deep well"; "a deep dive"; "deep water"; "a deep casserole"; "a deep gash". Wordnet Dictionary DB
  33. with head or back bent low; "a deep bow" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  34. large in quantity or size; "deep cuts in the budget" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  35. extreme; "in deep trouble"; "deep happiness" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  36. (of darkness) very intense; "thick night"; "thick darkness"; "a face in deep shadow"; "deep night" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  37. marked by depth of thinking; "deep thoughts"; "a deep allegory" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  38. relatively thick from top to bottom; "deep carpets"; "deep snow" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  39. Extending far below the surface; as, a deep well; extending far back; as, a deep, lot; penetrating; sagacious; profound; difficult to understand; as philosophy is a deep subject; absorbed; grave in tone, or low in pitch; intense; heavy; as, a deep sleep; strongly colored. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  40. Deeply. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  41. Extending far down; low; artful; secret; profound. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  42. Extending far downward, backward, or inward; profound; extreme; heartfelt. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  43. Sagacious; penetrating; also, scheming; designing. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  44. Low in tone; dark in hue. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  45. Extending far down; profound; low in situation; far in; back from the front line; swallowed up in; hidden; secret; difficult to fathom or comprehend; penetrative; darkly designing; grave in sound; intense. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  46. Being far below the surface; extending far downwards; low in situation, as a valley; not shallow; hidden; secret; penetrating; artful; insidious; grave in sound; low; solemn; profound; abstruse; thick; dark-coloured; profoundly quiet; depressed; sunk low; heartfelt; affecting. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.

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Usage examples for deep

  1. She became quite calm, now, gave a last, deep sigh: " Dear, listen ... – The Twilight of the Souls by Louis Couperus
  2. The snow was deep on the hillsides. – The Later Cave-Men by Katharine Elizabeth Dopp
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