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Definitions of gauge

  1. form an opinion about; judge tentatively; form an estimate of, as of quantities or time; "I estimate this chicken to weigh at three pounds" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. diameter of a tube or gun barrel Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. a measuring instrument for measuring and indicating a quantity or for testing conformity with a standard Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. accepted or approved instance or example of a quantity or quality against which others are judged or measured or compared Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. a measuring instrument for measuring and indicating a quantity such as the thickness of wire or the amount of rain etc. Wordnet Dictionary DB
  6. the thickness of wire Wordnet Dictionary DB
  7. the distance between the rails of a railway or between the wheels of a train Wordnet Dictionary DB
  8. mix in specific proportions; "gauge plaster" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  9. adapt to a specified measurement; "gauge the instruments" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  10. measure precisely and against a standard; "the wire is gauged" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  11. judge tentatively or form an estimate of (quantities or time); "I estimate this chicken to weigh three pounds" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  12. determine the capacity, volume, or contents of by measurement and calculation; "gauge the wine barrels" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  13. rub to a uniform size; "gauge bricks" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  14. To measure or determine with a gauge. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. To measure or to ascertain the contents or the capacity of, as of a pipe, barrel, or keg. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. To measure the dimensions of, or to test the accuracy of the form of, as of a part of a gunlock. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. To draw into equidistant gathers by running a thread through it, as cloth or a garment. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. To measure the capacity, character, or ability of; to estimate; to judge of. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. A measure; a standard of measure; an instrument to determine dimensions, distance, or capacity; a standard. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. Measure; dimensions; estimate. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. Any instrument for ascertaining or regulating the dimensions or forms of things; a templet or template; as, a button maker's gauge. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. Relative positions of two or more vessels with reference to the wind; as, a vessel has the weather gauge of another when on the windward side of it, and the lee gauge when on the lee side of it. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. The depth to which a vessel sinks in the water. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  24. The distance between the rails of a railway. Webster Dictionary DB
  25. The quantity of plaster of Paris used with common plaster to accelerate its setting. Webster Dictionary DB
  26. That part of a shingle, slate, or tile, which is exposed to the weather, when laid; also, one course of such shingles, slates, or tiles. Webster Dictionary DB
  27. Any instrument or apparatus for measuring the state of a phenomenon, or for ascertaining its numerical elements at any moment; - usually applied to some particular instrument; as, a rain gauge; a steam gauge. Webster Dictionary DB
  28. A measure. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  29. To measure. Also, gage. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  30. To measure or to ascertain the contents of; to ascertain the capacity of, as a pipe, puncheon, hogshead, barrel, tierce, keg, etc.: to measure in respect to proportion, capability, or power, or in respect to character or behavior; to take cognizance of the capacity, capability, or power of; to appraise; to estimate; as, I gauged his character very accurately. "The vanes nicely gauged on each said."-Derham. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  31. A standard of measure; an instrument to determine the dimensions or capacity of anything; a standard of any kind; a measure; means of estimating; "Timothy proposed to his mistress that she should entertain no servant that was above four foot seven inches high, and for that purpose had prepared a gauge, by which they were to be measured."-Arbuthnot: specifically, the distance between the rails of a railway; also, the distance between the opposite wheels of a carriage: naut (a) the depth to which a vessel sinks in the water; (b) the position of a ship with reference to another vessel and to the wind; when to the windward, she is said to have the weather-gauge, when to the leeward, the lee-gauge: in build, the length of a slate or tile below the lap: in plastering, (a) the quantity of plaster of Paris used with common plaster to accelerate its setting; (b) the composition of plaster of Paris and other materials, used in finishing plastered ceilings, for mouldings, etc.: in type-founding, a piece of hard wood variously notched, used to adjust the dimensions, slopes, etc., of the various sorts of letters: in joinery, a simple instrument made to strike a line parallel to the straight side of a board, etc.: in the air-pump, an instrument of various forms, which points out the degree of exhaustion in the receiver; the siphon-gauge is most generally used for this purpose. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  32. A standard of measure; measuring-rod. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  33. To measure the contents of, as a vessel. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  34. To measure; estimate. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  35. An instrument for measuring capacity or dimensions; a standard. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  36. Same as GAGE, etc. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  37. A measure; a standard of measure; the number of feet which a ship sinks in the water; the position of one vessel with respect to another, the weather-gauge being to weatherward, and the lee-gauge to leeward; a piece of hard wood variously notched, used to adjust the dimensions, slopes, &c., of the various sorts of letters; an instrument made to strike a line parallel to the straight side of a board; the distance between the rails, the broad gauge being 7 ft. and the narrow gauge 4 ft. 8 1/2 in. Sliding gauge, a tool used by mathematical instrument makers for measuring and setting off distances. Rain-gauge, an instrument for measuring the quantity of rain which falls at any given place. Sea-gauge, an instrument for finding the depth of the sea. Syphon-gauge, a gauge made in the form of a syphon, such as the steam-gauge, condenser-gauge, &c. Tide-gauge, an instrument for determining the height of the tides. Wind-gauge, an instrument for measuring the force of the wind on any given surface. Gauges, brass rings with handles, to find the diameter of all kinds of shot with expedition. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  38. To ascertain the capacity or the contents of; to measure in respect to capability; to estimate. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  39. A measure; a standard of measure; on a railway, the distance between the rails, usually 4 feet 8 1/2 inches; a workman's tool; a mixture of certain stuff and plaster, used in finishing the best ceilings, and for mouldings. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  40. To measure or ascertain the contents of a cask or vessel; to measure or ascertain, as the quantity, diameter, &c. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  41. Any instrument or apparatus for measuring the state of a phenomenon, or for ascertaining its numerical elements at any moment; -- usually applied to some particular instrument; as, a rain gauge; a steam gauge. mso.anu.edu.au
  42. The measure of width of a railway, fixed, with some exceptions, at 4 feet8% inches in Great Britain and America, and 5 feet 3 inches in Ireland. thelawdictionary.org
  43. GAGE, g[=a]j, n. a measuring-rod: a standard of measure: estimate.--v.t. to measure the contents of any vessel: to estimate ability.--adj. GAUGE'ABLE, capable of being gauged.--ns. GAUG'ER, an excise officer whose business is to gauge or measure the contents of casks; GAUG'ING, the art of measuring casks containing excisable liquors; GAUG'ING-ROD, an instrument for measuring the contents of casks; BROAD'-, NARR'OW-GAUGE, in railroad construction, a distance between the rails greater or less than 56½ inches, called standard gauge. [O. Fr. gauge (Fr. jauge), gauger; prob. related to jale, bowl, to galon, gallon, or to jalon, measuring stake.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  44. (in naut. sense), n. Standard measure to which things must conform, esp. measure of capacity or contents of barrel, diameter of bullet, or thickness of sheet iron; capacity, extent, scope, (take the g. of, estimate); distance between rails or opposite wheels (broad, narrow, g., of more, less, than in.); (Naut.; gage) relative position in respect to wind (have the weather g. of, be to wind ward of, fig. have advantage of; also rarely lee, southerly, &c., g.); graduated instrument measuring force or quantity of rainfall, stream, tide, wind, &c.; contrivance attached to vessel to show height of its contents; instrument for testing and verifying dimensions of tools, wire, &c.; adjustable carpenter\'s tool for marking parallel lines; (Print.) strip regulating depth of margin &c.; means of estimating, criterion, test. [old Northern French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  45. Measure exactly (esp. objects of standard size, as wire, bolts; fluctuating quantities or forces, as rainfall, wind; depth of liquid content); find capacity or content of (cask &c.) by measurement& calculation (gaugingrod, exciseman\'s instrument for this); estimate, take measure of, (person, character); make uniform, bring to standard size or shape. Hence gaugeable a., gauger (1, 2) n. [old Northern French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  46. See Gage. Appleton's medical dictionary.
  47. An instrument for measuring the volume of a material or the intensity or rapidity of a process. Appleton's medical dictionary.
  48. [O.Fr.] A kind of plaster used for mouldings on a ceiling. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  49. n. An instrument to determine dimensions or capacity; a standard of any kind;—dimensions; estimate;—any apparatus for measuring the state of a phenomenon;—position with reference to a vessel and to the wind;—the depth to which a vessel sinks in the water;—the distance between the rails of a railway;—the calibre of a gun;—the size of metallic wire or rods. Cabinet Dictionary
  50. A measure, a standard. Complete Dictionary

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