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Definitions of sound

  1. To make a noise; to utter a voice; to exhibit by sound; to be spread or published. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  2. To use the line and lead in searching the depth of water. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  3. To make a sound; make known or heard; give a signal by sound. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  4. To measure the depth of; cause to make a noise; order or announce by sound; as, to sound an alarm; examine or try; as, to sound one's opinions; probe. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  5. To cause to make a noise: to utter audibly: to direct by a sound or audible signal: to publish audibly. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  6. To measure the depth of, esp. with a line and plummet: to probe: to try to discover a man's secret wishes, etc.: to test: to introduce an instrument into the bladder to examine it. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  7. To cause to make a noise; utter aloud. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  8. To measure the depth of, as water; to probe; test. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  9. To try the depth of; examine; test. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  10. To make a noise or sound; be spread or published audibly; to give a certain impression, when heard; as, her voice sounds sad. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  11. To make a noise: to utter a voice: to spread. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  12. To use the line and lead in ascertaining the depth of water. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  13. To make a noise. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  14. To measure the depth of water. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  15. announce by means of a sound; "sound the alarm" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  16. utter with vibrating vocal chords Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  17. To sink a weight in order to ascertain depth. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  18. To cause to make a noise; to utteraudibly; to play.on; to signal by a sound; to celebrate or honour by sounds; to publish. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  19. To sink a plummet or lead to ascertain the depth of water; to introduce a sound into the bladder of a patient; to try; to examine; to endeavour to discover that which lies concealed in another's breast. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  20. To make a noise; to utter audibly; to play on; to celebrate or extol. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  21. To try, as the depth of water and the quality of the bottom, by sinking a plummet attached to a line; to use the line and lead to ascertain the depth of water; to try; to examine; to discover or endeavour to discover, as one's thoughts or opinions. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  22. the audible part of a transmitted signal; "they always raise the audio for commercials" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  23. the subjective sensation of hearing something; "he strained to hear the faint sounds" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  24. (phonetics) an individual sound unit of speech without concern as to whether or not it is a phoneme of some language Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  25. the particular auditory effect produced by a given cause; "the sound of rain on the roof"; "the beautiful sound of music" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  26. a large ocean inlet or deep bay; "the main body of the sound ran parallel to the coast" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  27. mechanical vibrations transmitted by an elastic medium; "falling trees make a sound in the forest even when no one is there to hear them" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  28. The. Webster Dictionary DB
  29. The impression made on the ear by the vibrations of the air; noise; a straight, fairly wide passage of water; the air bladder of a fish. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  30. Soundness, sounder. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  31. SOUNDNESS. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  32. A narrow passage of water: a strait. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  33. The air or swimming bladder of a fish. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  34. The impression produced on the ear by the vibrations of air: noise: report: empty or meaningless noise. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  35. An instrument to discover stone in the bladder. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  36. A narrow passage of water; strait; air-bladder of a fish. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  37. Noise; audible vibrations. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  38. The air bladder of a fish. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  39. The sensation received through the ear; the waves that affect the ear; noise. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  40. Surg. A probe. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  41. An impression produced on the ear by vibrations in the air; that which affects the ear; noise; reports noise without signification; empty noise. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  42. A narrow passage of water; a shallow sea or strait connecting two seas. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  43. The air-bladder of a fish; the cuttlefish. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  44. A surgical instrument for feeling what is beyond the reach of the fingers. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  45. Anything perceptible to the ear; that which strikes the ear; noise; report; noise without significance. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  46. A narrow passage of water which may be crossed by swimming, or whose depth may be ascertained; a narrow arm of the sea. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  47. In surg., a probe or other instr. used to examine the bladder or a wound. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  48. deeply or completely; "slept soundly through the storm"; "is sound asleep" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  49. Soundly. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  50. Soundly; profoundly; said of sleeping. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  51. Soundly; heartily. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  52. exercising or showing good judgment; "healthy scepticism"; "a healthy fear of rattlesnakes"; "the healthy attitude of French laws"; "healthy relations between labor and management"; "an intelligent solution"; "a sound approach to the problem";"sound advice"; "no reasonable explanation for his decision" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  53. (of sleep) deep and complete; "a heavy sleep"; "fell into a profound sleep"; "a sound sleeper"; "deep wakeless sleep" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  54. having legal efficacy or force; "a sound title to the property" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  55. reflects weight of sound argument or evidence; "a sound argument" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  56. the sudden occurrence of an audible event; "the sound awakened them" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  57. measure the depth of (a body of water) with a sounding line Wordnet Dictionary DB
  58. appear in a certain way; "This sounds interesting" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  59. give off a certain sound or sounds; "This record sounds scratchy" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  60. make a certain noise or sound; "She went `Mmmmm'"; "The gun went `bang'" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  61. cause to sound; "sound the bell"; "sound a certain note" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  62. thorough; "a sound thrashing" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  63. in excellent physical condition; "good teeth"; "I still have one good leg"; "a sound mind in a sound body" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  64. free from moral defect; "a man of sound character" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  65. financially secure and safe; "sound investments"; "a sound economy" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  66. in good condition; free from defect or damage or decay; "a sound timber"; "the wall is sound"; "a sound foundation" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  67. The air bladder of a fish; as, cod sounds are an esteemed article of food. Newage Dictionary DB
  68. Whole; unbroken; unharmed; free from flaw, defect, or decay; perfect of the kind; as, sound timber; sound fruit; a sound tooth; a sound ship. Newage Dictionary DB
  69. Healthy; not diseased; not being in a morbid state; -- said of body or mind; as, a sound body; a sound constitution; a sound understanding. Newage Dictionary DB
  70. Firm; strong; safe. Newage Dictionary DB
  71. Free from error; correct; right; honest; true; faithful; orthodox; -- said of persons; as, a sound lawyer; a sound thinker. Newage Dictionary DB
  72. Founded in truth or right; supported by justice; not to be overthrown on refuted; not fallacious; as, sound argument or reasoning; a sound objection; sound doctrine; sound principles. Newage Dictionary DB
  73. heavy; laid on with force; as, a sound beating. Newage Dictionary DB
  74. Undisturbed; deep; profound; as, sound sleep. Newage Dictionary DB
  75. Founded in law; legal; valid; not defective; as, a sound title to land. Newage Dictionary DB
  76. A narrow passage of water, or a strait between the mainland and an island; also, a strait connecting two seas, or connecting a sea or lake with the ocean; as, the Sound between the Baltic and the german Ocean; Long Island Sound. Newage Dictionary DB
  77. To measure the depth of; to fathom; especially, to ascertain the depth of by means of a line and plummet. Newage Dictionary DB
  78. Fig.: To ascertain, or try to ascertain, the thoughts, motives, and purposes of (a person); to examine; to try; to test; to probe. Newage Dictionary DB
  79. To explore, as the bladder or urethra, with a sound; to examine with a sound; also, to examine by auscultation or percussion; as, to sound a patient. Newage Dictionary DB
  80. To ascertain the depth of water with a sounding line or other device. Newage Dictionary DB
  81. Any elongated instrument or probe, usually metallic, by which cavities of the body are sounded or explored, especially the bladder for stone, or the urethra for a stricture. Newage Dictionary DB
  82. The occasion of sound; the impulse or vibration which would occasion sound to a percipient if present with unimpaired; hence, the theory of vibrations in elastic media such cause sound; as, a treatise on sound. Newage Dictionary DB
  83. Noise without signification; empty noise; noise and nothing else. Newage Dictionary DB
  84. To make a noise; to utter a voice; to make an impulse of the air that shall strike the organs of hearing with a perceptible effect. Newage Dictionary DB
  85. To be conveyed in sound; to be spread or published; to convey intelligence by sound. Newage Dictionary DB
  86. To make or convey a certain impression, or to have a certain import, when heard; hence, to seem; to appear; as, this reproof sounds harsh; the story sounds like an invention. Newage Dictionary DB
  87. To causse to make a noise; to play on; as, to sound a trumpet or a horn. Newage Dictionary DB
  88. To cause to exit as a sound; as, to sound a note with the voice, or on an instrument. Newage Dictionary DB
  89. To order, direct, indicate, or proclain by a sound, or sounds; to give a signal for by a certain sound; as, to sound a retreat; to sound a parley. Newage Dictionary DB
  90. To celebrate or honor by sounds; to cause to be reported; to publish or proclaim; as, to sound the praises of fame of a great man or a great exploit. Newage Dictionary DB
  91. To examine the condition of (anything) by causing the same to emit sounds and noting their character; as, to sound a piece of timber; to sound a vase; to sound the lungs of a patient. Newage Dictionary DB
  92. To signify; to import; to denote. Newage Dictionary DB
  93. Whole; as, safe and sound; entire; unbroken; as, a sound slumber; healthy; not decayed; as, a sound tooth; founded on truth or right; as, sound doctrine; morally good or honorable; firm; safe; strong; legal; valid; as, a sound title. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  94. Safe, whole, entire: perfect: healthy, strong: profound: correct: orthodox: weighty. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  95. Whole; healthy; perfect; uncorrupted; correct. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  96. Normal; unimpaired; healthy; true; right; solvent; thorough. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  97. Entire; whole; unbroken; undecayed; perfect; healthy; hearty; solid; valid; right; stout; lusty; not deranged. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  98. Healthy; not diseased; strong; healthy in mind; unbroken; not defective; not decayed; unhurt; correct; free from error; orthodox; not enfeebled. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.

What are the misspellings for sound?

Usage examples for sound

  1. How's that sound to you, Gyp?" – Tinker's Dam by Joseph Tinker
  2. It doesn't sound any different. – Nan Sherwood on the Mexican Border by Annie Roe Carr
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