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Definitions of stick

  1. come or be in close contact with; stick or hold together and resist separation; "The dress clings to her body"; "The label stuck to the box"; "The sushi rice grains cohere" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. stick to firmly; "Will this wallpaper adhere to the wall?" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. a lever used by a pilot to control the ailerons and elevators of an airplane Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. marijuana leaves rolled into a cigarette for smoking Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. fix, force, or implant; "lodge a bullet in the table" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. cause to protrude or as if to protrude; "stick one's hand out of the window"; "stick one's nose into other people's business" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. stay put (in a certain place); "We are staying in Detroit; we are not moving to Cincinnati"; "Stay put in the corner here!"; "Stick around and you will learn something!" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. threat of a penalty; "the policy so far is all stick and no carrot" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. implement consisting of a length of wood; "he collected dry sticks for a campfire"; "the kid had a candied apple on a stick" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. a small thin branch of a tree Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. saddle with something disagreeable or disadvantageous; "They stuck me with the dinner bill"; "I was stung with a huge tax bill" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  12. pierce with a thrust Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  13. be a mystery or bewildering to; "This beats me!"; "Got me--I don't know the answer!"; "a vexing problem"; "This question really stuck me" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  14. pierce or penetrate or puncture with something pointed; "He stuck the needle into his finger" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  15. pierce with a thrust using a pointed instrument; "he stuck the cloth with the needle" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  16. fasten into place by fixing an end or point into something; "stick the corner of the sheet under the mattress" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  17. fasten with or as with pins or nails; "stick the photo onto the corkboard" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  18. fasten with an adhesive material like glue; "stick the poster onto the wall" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  19. cover and decorate with objects that pierce the surface; "stick some feathers in the turkey before you serve it" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  20. be a devoted follower or supporter; "The residents of this village adhered to Catholicism"; "She sticks to her principles" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  21. endure; "The label stuck to her for the rest of her life" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  22. be or become fixed; "The door sticks--we will have to plane it" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  23. A small shoot, or branch, separated, as by a cutting, from a tree or shrub; also, any stem or branch of a tree, of any size, cut for fuel or timber. Newage Dictionary DB
  24. Any long and comparatively slender piece of wood, whether in natural form or shaped with tools; a rod; a wand; a staff; as, the stick of a rocket; a walking stick. Newage Dictionary DB
  25. Anything shaped like a stick; as, a stick of wax. Newage Dictionary DB
  26. A derogatory expression for a person; one who is inert or stupid; as, an odd stick; a poor stick. Newage Dictionary DB
  27. A composing stick. See under Composing. It is usually a frame of metal, but for posters, handbills, etc., one made of wood is used. Newage Dictionary DB
  28. A thrust with a pointed instrument; a stab. Newage Dictionary DB
  29. To penetrate with a pointed instrument; to pierce; to stab; hence, to kill by piercing; as, to stick a beast. Newage Dictionary DB
  30. To cause to penetrate; to push, thrust, or drive, so as to pierce; as, to stick a needle into one's finger. Newage Dictionary DB
  31. To fasten, attach, or cause to remain, by thrusting in; hence, also, to adorn or deck with things fastened on as by piercing; as, to stick a pin on the sleeve. Newage Dictionary DB
  32. To set; to fix in; as, to stick card teeth. Newage Dictionary DB
  33. To set with something pointed; as, to stick cards. Newage Dictionary DB
  34. To fix on a pointed instrument; to impale; as, to stick an apple on a fork. Newage Dictionary DB
  35. To attach by causing to adhere to the surface; as, to stick on a plaster; to stick a stamp on an envelope; also, to attach in any manner. Newage Dictionary DB
  36. To compose; to set, or arrange, in a composing stick; as, to stick type. Newage Dictionary DB
  37. To run or plane (moldings) in a machine, in contradistinction to working them by hand. Such moldings are said to be stuck. Newage Dictionary DB
  38. To cause to stick; to bring to a stand; to pose; to puzzle; as, to stick one with a hard problem. Newage Dictionary DB
  39. To impose upon; to compel to pay; sometimes, to cheat. Newage Dictionary DB
  40. To adhere; as, glue sticks to the fingers; paste sticks to the wall. Newage Dictionary DB
  41. To remain where placed; to be fixed; to hold fast to any position so as to be moved with difficulty; to cling; to abide; to cleave; to be united closely. Newage Dictionary DB
  42. To be prevented from going farther; to stop by reason of some obstacle; to be stayed. Newage Dictionary DB
  43. To be embarrassed or puzzled; to hesitate; to be deterred, as by scruples; to scruple; -- often with at. Newage Dictionary DB
  44. To cause difficulties, scruples, or hesitation. Newage Dictionary DB
  45. Stuck. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  46. To work diligently, as one who pegs shoes; - usually with on, at, or away; as, to peg away at a task. Webster Dictionary DB
  47. A small branch or shoot cut off a tree; a long, thin piece of wood; something similar in shape to such a piece; as, a stick of candy; a rod or wand to be held in the hand, as a cane. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  48. To push or thrust so as to penetrate something; as, to stick a pin in a cushion; pierce with a pointed instrument; as, to stick a finger with a pin; stab; kill by thrusting a pointed instrument through; as, to stick pigs; to push or poke; as, to stick out one's foot; cause to adhere. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  49. To be held or fixed by being thrust in; as, a pin sticks in a cushion; be pushed outward or forward; protrude; with up, out, from, through; to hold to a surface; adhere; as, dough sticks to the hands; cling closely; as, to stick to a cause; to be stopped from going farther; as, the cart stuck in the mud; be puzzled; hesitate: with at; as, he will stick at nothing to gain his ends. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  50. Sticker. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  51. Sticking. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  52. A piece of wood of indefinite size and shape, generally long and rather slender; a branch of a tree or shrub cut or broken off; a piece of wood chopped for burning or cut for any purpose; as, to gather sticks in a wood; "He that breaks a stick of Gloster's grove."-Shak.; "And while the children of Israel were in the wilderness they found a man that gathered sticks upon the Sabbath day."-Num. xv. 32: a rod or wand; a staff; a walking-stick; as, he never goes out without his stick; anything shaped like a stick; as, a stick of sealing-wax: a contemptuous term applied to an awkward or incompetent person; "He is a stick at letters."-Cornhill Mag.: in printing, an instrument in which types are composed in words, and the words arranged to the required length of the lines. Called also COMPOSING-STICK: a thrust with a pointed instrument that penetrates a body; a stab. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  53. To stab: to thrust in: to fasten by piercing: to fix in: to set with something pointed: to cause to adhere. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  54. To hold to: to remain: to stop: to be hindered: to hesitate, to be embarrassed or puzzled: to adhere closely in affection:-pa.t. and pa.p. stuck. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  55. Rod or branch of wood; staff. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  56. To adhere; remain fixed; be hindered. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  57. To stab; fix in; cause to adhere. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  58. To cause to pierce. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  59. To fix in place by inserting. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  60. To be held by being thrust in. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  61. To protrude; with out, through, and from. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  62. To attach by some adhesive substance. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  63. To cleave to a surface; stay attached. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  64. To be stopped, perplexed, or disconcerted. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  65. A piece of wood that is long, comparedwith its breadth and thickness; a rod, wand, or cane. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  66. Print. A metal frame in which type is composed. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  67. A penetrating thrust; stab. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  68. A small shoot or branch cut off a tree; a long slender piece of wood or other material; a thrust with a pointed instrument that penetrates the body; a stab. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  69. To pierce; to stab; to kill by piercing; to thrust in; to fasten; to set; to fix in; to set with something pointed; to fix on something pointed. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  70. To adhere; to cling fast to; to stop; to be impeded; to hesitate; to be stopped; to be embarrassed. To stick to, to adhere closely. To stick upon, to dwell upon. To stick out, to project. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  71. A long, small, piece of wood; a tem or branch of a tree cut for fuel; a rod; a stab; a thrust or sharp blow with a pointed instr. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  72. To pierce; to stab; to fix in or on; to hold or cleave to; to adhere closely; to remain, as in the memory; to be hindered from proceeding; to be constant or firm; to resist efforts to remove; to scruple; to hesitate. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  73. To be embarrassed or puzzled; to hesitate; to be deterred, as by scruples; to scruple; often with at. dictgcide_fs
  74. stik, v.t. to stab: to thrust in: to fasten by piercing: to fix in: to set with something pointed: to cause to adhere.--v.i. to hold to: to remain: to stop: to be hindered: to hesitate, to be embarrassed or puzzled: to adhere closely in affection:--pa.t. and pa.p. stuck.--ns. STICK'ER, one who kills pigs, &c.: one who sticks to anything; STICK'ING, the act of stabbing; STICK'ING-PLACE, the point at which a thing sticks or stays; STICK'ING-PLAS'TER, an adhesive plaster for closing wounds; STICK'-IN-THE-MUD, an old fogy; STICK'IT-MIN'ISTER (Scot.), a licentiate who never gets a pastoral charge.--STICK AT, to hesitate: to persist at; STICK BY, to be firm in supporting, to adhere closely to; STICK OUT, to be prominent, project; STICK PIGS, to hunt wild hogs on horseback and transfix them with the spear; STICK TO, to persevere in holding to; STICK UP, to stand up: to waylay and plunder, as a mail-coach by bushrangers; STICK UP FOR, to speak or act in defence of.--BE STUCK ON (U.S.), to be enamoured of; STUCK UP, conceited. [A.S. stecan (assumed); Ger. stechen, Dut. steken; also A.S. stician, Ger. stecken, to set, stick fast.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  75. stik, n. a small shoot or branch cut off a tree: a staff or walking-stick: anything in the form of a stick, a cudgel: a piece of printers' furniture used to lock up a form in a chase, a printer's composing-stick: a stiff, stupidly obstinate person.--v.t. to furnish or set with sticks: to arrange in a composing-stick.--n. STICK'-IN'SECT, a walking-stick or phasmid insect. [A.S. sticca; Ice. stika.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  76. (stuck), & n. Thrust point of in (to) or through (s. the spurs in; s. bayonet, pin, into or through); insert pointed thing (s) into, stab, (s. pigs, of butcher, also of mounted sportsman spearing wild pig; will pull out a knife& s. you; tipsy-cake stuck over or stuck with almonds; cushion stuck full of pins); fix (up)on pointed thing, be fixed (as) by point in (to) or on (to), (colloq.) put in specified position, (heads were stuck on spikes of gateway; arrows s. in target; work with needle, body with dagger left, sticking in it; s. feather, rose, in cap, buttonhole; s. pen behind one\'s ear; s. up a target, erect it; s. your cap on; s. them in your pocket; s. a few commas in; just s. it on the table, down anywhere); (with out, up) protrude, (cause to) project, be or make erect, (s. one\'s head out of window; his hair sticks straight up; s.-up collar, not turned down; s. out one\'s chest; how his stomach sticks out!; stuck-up, conceited, insolently exclusive, prob. f. carriage of head; s. up to, not humble oneself before, offer resistance to; s. up for, maintain cause or character of esp. absent person); fix or become or remain fixed (as) by adhesion of surfaces, (cause to) adhere or cleave, (s. postage-stamp on; this envelope will not s.; if you throw MUD enough, some of it will s., innocence is not proof against scandal; limpet sticks to rock; the name stuck to him or stuck, was not forgotten; friend that sticketh closer than a brother; can you s. on a horse?, escape being thrown; some of the money stuck in or to his fingers, was appropriated or embezzled by him; friends should s. together; s. to friend, resolve, promise, word, &c., abide by, remain faithful to; s. bills, post placards on wall &c.; s. to it, persist, not cease trying; s. in photographs, paste them in book &c.; sticks like a bur, is not to be got rid of; are you going to s. in or indoors all day?, remain at home; so perh. s. out for higher price, better terms, &c., refuse to take lower); lose or deprive of power of motion through friction, jamming, suction, difficulty, or other impediment (s. in the mud lit., & fig. be unprogressive; s.-in-the-mud a., slow, unprogressive, n. person of such kind; also slang Mrs &c. S.-i.-t.-m., Mrs &c. So-&-so; sticks in my throat, I cannot swallow it lit. or fig.; sticks in one\'s gizzard, cannot be digested fig.; s. fast, be hopelessly bogged &c.; is stuck on a sandbank; got up to the fourth form, through some ten lines, & there stuck; s. at nothing, allow nothing, esp. no scruples, to deter one; stuck up slang, completely at a loss; that will s. him up, puzzle him; s. up bank, mail-coach, &c. slang, terrorize officials, passengers, &c., in order to rob); provide (plant) with s. as support or to climb up; set (type) in COMPOSING-s., whence stickful (2) n.; sticking-place, -point, at which screw becomes jammed (usu. fig. w. ref. to Macbeth I. vii. 60); sticking-plaster, adhesive plaster for wounds &c. (N.) shoot of tree cut to convenient length for use as walking-cane or bludgeon, staff, wand, rod, piece of wood whether as part of something or separate more or less resembling these in shape& size, (cut a s. from the hedge; cannot walk without a s.; gathering ss. to make a fire, twigs; GOLD, SWORD, SINGLE, BROOM, FIDDLE, DRUM, umbrella, rocket, -s.; riding on broomstick, witch\'s way of transporting herself through air; house was pulled down& not a s. left standing; a few ss. of furniture, chairs &c. of simple kind; wants the s., should be caned; as CROSS as, DEVIL on, two ss.; in a cleft s., see CLEAVE; CUT one\'s s.), (Naut., joe.) mast or spar, (Mus.) conductor\'s baton, (fig.) person of no vigour or intelligence or social qualities; slender more or less cylindrical piece of sugar-candy, sealing-wax, shaving-soap, &c.; (short, with aid of context, for) fiddles., drum-s., composing-s., &c.; s.-insect, =WALKING-s. insect. [middle English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  77. (slang), endure the conditions (could not s. it any longer); s. it on (slang), make high charges, exaggerate in narration; stickjaw (slang), pudding &c. hard to masticate. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  78. n. [Anglo-Saxon, Icelandic, Geman] The small shoot or branch of a tree or shrub cut off; a rod a staff ;-any stem or branch of a tree of any size cut for fuel or timber;-an instrument of adjustable width in which types are arranged in words and lines ;-a thrust ; a stab. Cabinet Dictionary

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