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Definitions of stick

  1. To adhere; to cling fast to; to stop; to be impeded; to hesitate; to be stopped; to be embarrassed. To stick to, to adhere closely. To stick upon, to dwell upon. To stick out, to project. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  2. To push or thrust so as to penetrate something; as, to stick a pin in a cushion; pierce with a pointed instrument; as, to stick a finger with a pin; stab; kill by thrusting a pointed instrument through; as, to stick pigs; to push or poke; as, to stick out one's foot; cause to adhere. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  3. To stab: to thrust in: to fasten by piercing: to fix in: to set with something pointed: to cause to adhere. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  4. To stab; fix in; cause to adhere. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  5. To fix in place by inserting. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  6. To attach by some adhesive substance. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  7. To work diligently, as one who pegs shoes; - usually with on, at, or away; as, to peg away at a task. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. To be held or fixed by being thrust in; as, a pin sticks in a cushion; be pushed outward or forward; protrude; with up, out, from, through; to hold to a surface; adhere; as, dough sticks to the hands; cling closely; as, to stick to a cause; to be stopped from going farther; as, the cart stuck in the mud; be puzzled; hesitate: with at; as, he will stick at nothing to gain his ends. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  9. To adhere; remain fixed; be hindered. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  10. stick to firmly; "Will this wallpaper adhere to the wall?" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. saddle with something disagreeable or disadvantageous; "They stuck me with the dinner bill"; "I was stung with a huge tax bill" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  12. pierce with a thrust Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  13. pierce or penetrate or puncture with something pointed; "He stuck the needle into his finger" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  14. pierce with a thrust using a pointed instrument; "he stuck the cloth with the needle" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  15. fasten into place by fixing an end or point into something; "stick the corner of the sheet under the mattress" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  16. fasten with or as with pins or nails; "stick the photo onto the corkboard" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  17. fasten with an adhesive material like glue; "stick the poster onto the wall" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  18. cover and decorate with objects that pierce the surface; "stick some feathers in the turkey before you serve it" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  19. endure; "The label stuck to her for the rest of her life" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  20. be or become fixed; "The door sticks--we will have to plane it" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  21. A small shoot, or branch, separated, as by a cutting, from a tree or shrub; also, any stem or branch of a tree, of any size, cut for fuel or timber. Newage Dictionary DB
  22. Any long and comparatively slender piece of wood, whether in natural form or shaped with tools; a rod; a wand; a staff; as, the stick of a rocket; a walking stick. Newage Dictionary DB
  23. Anything shaped like a stick; as, a stick of wax. Newage Dictionary DB
  24. A derogatory expression for a person; one who is inert or stupid; as, an odd stick; a poor stick. Newage Dictionary DB
  25. A composing stick. See under Composing. It is usually a frame of metal, but for posters, handbills, etc., one made of wood is used. Newage Dictionary DB
  26. A thrust with a pointed instrument; a stab. Newage Dictionary DB
  27. To penetrate with a pointed instrument; to pierce; to stab; hence, to kill by piercing; as, to stick a beast. Newage Dictionary DB
  28. To cause to penetrate; to push, thrust, or drive, so as to pierce; as, to stick a needle into one's finger. Newage Dictionary DB
  29. To fasten, attach, or cause to remain, by thrusting in; hence, also, to adorn or deck with things fastened on as by piercing; as, to stick a pin on the sleeve. Newage Dictionary DB
  30. To set; to fix in; as, to stick card teeth. Newage Dictionary DB
  31. To set with something pointed; as, to stick cards. Newage Dictionary DB
  32. To fix on a pointed instrument; to impale; as, to stick an apple on a fork. Newage Dictionary DB
  33. To attach by causing to adhere to the surface; as, to stick on a plaster; to stick a stamp on an envelope; also, to attach in any manner. Newage Dictionary DB
  34. To compose; to set, or arrange, in a composing stick; as, to stick type. Newage Dictionary DB
  35. To run or plane (moldings) in a machine, in contradistinction to working them by hand. Such moldings are said to be stuck. Newage Dictionary DB
  36. To cause to stick; to bring to a stand; to pose; to puzzle; as, to stick one with a hard problem. Newage Dictionary DB
  37. To impose upon; to compel to pay; sometimes, to cheat. Newage Dictionary DB
  38. To adhere; as, glue sticks to the fingers; paste sticks to the wall. Newage Dictionary DB
  39. To remain where placed; to be fixed; to hold fast to any position so as to be moved with difficulty; to cling; to abide; to cleave; to be united closely. Newage Dictionary DB
  40. To be prevented from going farther; to stop by reason of some obstacle; to be stayed. Newage Dictionary DB
  41. To be embarrassed or puzzled; to hesitate; to be deterred, as by scruples; to scruple; -- often with at. Newage Dictionary DB
  42. To cause difficulties, scruples, or hesitation. Newage Dictionary DB
  43. To be held by being thrust in. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  44. To protrude; with out, through, and from. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  45. To cleave to a surface; stay attached. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  46. To be stopped, perplexed, or disconcerted. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  47. To pierce; to stab; to kill by piercing; to thrust in; to fasten; to set; to fix in; to set with something pointed; to fix on something pointed. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  48. To pierce; to stab; to fix in or on; to hold or cleave to; to adhere closely; to remain, as in the memory; to be hindered from proceeding; to be constant or firm; to resist efforts to remove; to scruple; to hesitate. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  49. Sticking. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  50. a lever used by a pilot to control the ailerons and elevators of an airplane Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  51. threat of a penalty; "the policy so far is all stick and no carrot" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  52. implement consisting of a length of wood; "he collected dry sticks for a campfire"; "the kid had a candied apple on a stick" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  53. a small thin branch of a tree Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  54. A small branch or shoot cut off a tree; a long, thin piece of wood; something similar in shape to such a piece; as, a stick of candy; a rod or wand to be held in the hand, as a cane. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  55. Sticker. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  56. A piece of wood of indefinite size and shape, generally long and rather slender; a branch of a tree or shrub cut or broken off; a piece of wood chopped for burning or cut for any purpose; as, to gather sticks in a wood; "He that breaks a stick of Gloster's grove."-Shak.; "And while the children of Israel were in the wilderness they found a man that gathered sticks upon the Sabbath day."-Num. xv. 32: a rod or wand; a staff; a walking-stick; as, he never goes out without his stick; anything shaped like a stick; as, a stick of sealing-wax: a contemptuous term applied to an awkward or incompetent person; "He is a stick at letters."-Cornhill Mag.: in printing, an instrument in which types are composed in words, and the words arranged to the required length of the lines. Called also COMPOSING-STICK: a thrust with a pointed instrument that penetrates a body; a stab. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  57. Rod or branch of wood; staff. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  58. A piece of wood that is long, comparedwith its breadth and thickness; a rod, wand, or cane. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  59. Print. A metal frame in which type is composed. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  60. A penetrating thrust; stab. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  61. A small shoot or branch cut off a tree; a long slender piece of wood or other material; a thrust with a pointed instrument that penetrates the body; a stab. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  62. A long, small, piece of wood; a tem or branch of a tree cut for fuel; a rod; a stab; a thrust or sharp blow with a pointed instr. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.

Usage examples for stick

  1. One of them said that he found a stick and that when he struck a door with it, that door would spring open. – Household Tales by Brothers Grimm by Grimm Brothers
  2. Why can't they stick to one line? – Watersprings by Arthur Christopher Benson
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