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Definitions of arrest

  1. take into custody, as of suspected criminals, by the police Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. the act of apprehending (especially apprehending a criminal); "the policeman on the beat got credit for the collar" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. cause to stop; "Halt the engines"; "Arrest the progress"; "halt the presses" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. the state of inactivity following an interruption; "the negotiations were in arrest"; "held them in check"; "during the halt he got some lunch"; "the momentary stay enabled him to escape the blow"; "he spent the entire stop in his seat" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. attract and fix; "His look caught her"; "She caught his eye"; "Catch the attention of the waiter" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. hold back, as of a danger or an enemy; check the expansion or influence of; "Arrest the downward trend"; "Check the growth of communism in Sout East Asia"; "Contain the rebel movement"; "Turn back the tide of communism" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  7. take into custody; "the police nabbed the suspected criminals" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  8. To stop; to check or hinder the motion or action of; as, to arrest the current of a river; to arrest the senses. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. To take, seize, or apprehend by authority of law; as, to arrest one for debt, or for a crime. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. To seize on and fix; to hold; to catch; as, to arrest the eyes or attention. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. To rest or fasten; to fix; to concentrate. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. To tarry; to rest. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. The act of stopping, or restraining from further motion, etc.; stoppage; hindrance; restraint; as, an arrest of development. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. The taking or apprehending of a person by authority of law; legal restraint; custody. Also, a decree, mandate, or warrant. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. Any seizure by power, physical or moral. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. A situation in which the police detain a person in a manner that, to any reasonable person, makes it clear she is not free to leave. A person can be "under arrest" even though the police have not announced it; nor are handcuffs or physical restraint necessary. Questioning an arrested person about her involvement in or knowledge of a crime must be preceded by the Miranda warnings if the police intend to use the answers against the person in a criminal case. If the arrested person chooses to remain silent, the questioning must stop.
  17. A scurfiness of the back part of the hind leg of a horse; - also named rat-tails. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. To stop or stay; to check or hinder the action or motion of; to seize, take, or apprehend by legal authority; to seize and fix, as the eye or attention. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  19. The act of seizing; the state of being seized or detained by legal authority. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  20. 1. To stop, check, restrain. 2. A stoppage; an interference with or a checking of the regular course of a disease or symptom or the performance of a function. A practical medical dictionary. By Stedman, Thomas Lathrop. Published 1920.
  21. To stop; delay. Warner's pocket medical dictionary of today. By William R. Warner. Published 1898.
  22. To stop: to seize: to apprehend by legal authority. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  23. Stoppage: seizure by warrant. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  24. To seize; detain; seize by warrant. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  25. To stop suddenly; check; fix. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  26. To take into custody. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  27. An arresting; a stop, check, or stay; seizure by legal authority. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  28. Stoppage by seizure; hindrance; interruption; a legal caption or seizure of the person; a mangy humour on the hind legs of a horse. Arrest of judgment, the staying or stopping of a judgment after verdict, for causes assigned. See Rest. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  29. To stop; to check; to seize or apprehend by legal warrant; to seize and fix. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  30. To stop; to hinder; to restrain; to seize by authority. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  31. Hindrance; restraint; seizure by authority. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  32. A scurfiness of the back part of the hind leg of a horse; -- also named rat-tails. mso.anu.edu.au
  33. To keep a person in lawful custody. A warrant, crime, or statute can authorize this. thelawdictionary.org
  34. In criminal cases. The apprehending or detaining of the person, in order to be forthcoming to answer an alleged or suspected crime. The word arrest is more properly used in civil cases, and apprehension in criminal. A man is arrested under a capias ad respondendum, apprehended under a warrant charging him with a larceny. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  35. It will be convenient to consider, 1, who may be arrested; 2, for what crimes; 3, at what time; 4, in what places; 5, by whom and by what authority. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  36. Who may be arrested. Generally all persons properly accused of a crime or misdeameanor, may be arrested; by the laws of the United States, ambassadors (q. v.) and other public ministers are exempt from arrest. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  37. For what offences an arrest may be made. It may be made for treason, felony, breach of the peace, or other misdemeanor. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  38. At what time. An arrest may be made in the night as well as in the day time and for treasons, felonies, and breaches of the peace, on Sunday as well as on other days. It may be made before as well as after indictment found. Wallace's R. 23. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  39. At what places. No place affords protection to offenders against the criminal law; a man may therefore be arrested in his own house, (q. v.) which may be broken into for the purpose of making the arrest. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  40. Who may arrest and by what authority. An offender may be arrested either without a warrant or with a warrant. First, an arrest may be made without a warrant by a private individual or by a peace officer. Private individuals are enjoined by law to arrest an offender when present at the time a felony is committed, or a dangerous wound given11 Johns. R. 486 and vide Hawk. B. 1, c, 12, s. 1; c. 13, F3. 7, 8; 4 Bl. Com. 292; 1 Hale, 587; Com. Dig. Imprisonment, H 4; Bac. Ab. Trespass, D. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  41. Peace officers may, a fortiori, make an arrest for a crime or misdemeanor committed in their view, without any warrant. 8 Serg. & R. 47. An arrest may therefore be made by a constable, (q. v.) a justice of the peace, (q. v.) slieriff, (q. v.) or coroner. (q. v.) Secondly, an arrest may be made by virtue of a warrant, (q. v.) which is the proper course when the circumstances of the case will permit it. Vide, generally, 1 Chit. Cr. Law, 11 to 71; Russ. on Cr. Index, h. t. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  42. A scurfiness of the back part of the hind leg of a horse; also named rat-tails. dictgcide_fs
  43. ar-rest', v.t. to stop: to seize: to catch the attention: to apprehend by legal authority.--n. stoppage: seizure by warrant.--adj. ARREST'ABLE, liable to be arrested.--n. ARREST[=A]'TION, the act of arresting: arrest.--adj. ARREST'IVE, with a tendency to arrest.--n. ARREST'MENT (law), detention of a person arrested till liberated on bail, or by security: (Scots law) the process which prohibits a debtor from making payment to his creditor until another debt due to the person making use of the arrestment by such creditor is paid. [O. Fr. arester--L. ad, to, rest[=a]re, to stand still.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  44. Stop (person, cannon-ball, decay); (Law) a. judgment, stay proceedings after verdict, on ground of error; seize (person), esp. by legal authority; catch (attention); catch attention of. Hence arrestive a., arrestment n. [old French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  45. Stoppage, check; a. of judgement (see prec.); seizure; legal apprehension; imprisonment; under a. (legal restraint). [old French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  46. [O. Fr.] Confinement of an officer pending judicial inquiry as to misconduct. He is required to give up his sword whilst under A. , and his word of honour is trusted as to not leaving his quarters. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  47. n. The taking or apprehending of a person by authority of law; –stay of judgment after verdict; –any seizure, physical or moral; –a scurfiness of the hind leg of a horse. Cabinet Dictionary
  48. In law, a stop or stay; an arrest is a restraint of a man's person; any caption. Complete Dictionary

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