Spellcheck.net

Definitions of arrest

  1. To stop; to check or hinder the motion or action of; as, to arrest the current of a river; to arrest the senses. Webster Dictionary DB
  2. To take, seize, or apprehend by authority of law; as, to arrest one for debt, or for a crime. Webster Dictionary DB
  3. To seize on and fix; to hold; to catch; as, to arrest the eyes or attention. Webster Dictionary DB
  4. To rest or fasten; to fix; to concentrate. Webster Dictionary DB
  5. The act of stopping, or restraining from further motion, etc.; stoppage; hindrance; restraint; as, an arrest of development. Webster Dictionary DB
  6. Any seizure by power, physical or moral. Webster Dictionary DB
  7. A scurfiness of the back part of the hind leg of a horse; - also named rat-tails. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. To stop or stay; to check or hinder the action or motion of; to seize, take, or apprehend by legal authority; to seize and fix, as the eye or attention. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  9. To stop: to seize: to apprehend by legal authority. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  10. To seize; detain; seize by warrant. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  11. To stop suddenly; check; fix. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  12. To take into custody. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  13. To tarry; to rest. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. To stop; to check; to seize or apprehend by legal warrant; to seize and fix. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  15. To stop; to hinder; to restrain; to seize by authority. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  16. the act of apprehending (especially apprehending a criminal); "the policeman on the beat got credit for the collar" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  17. the state of inactivity following an interruption; "the negotiations were in arrest"; "held them in check"; "during the halt he got some lunch"; "the momentary stay enabled him to escape the blow"; "he spent the entire stop in his seat" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  18. hold back, as of a danger or an enemy; check the expansion or influence of; "Arrest the downward trend"; "Check the growth of communism in Sout East Asia"; "Contain the rebel movement"; "Turn back the tide of communism" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  19. take into custody; "the police nabbed the suspected criminals" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  20. A situation in which the police detain a person in a manner that, to any reasonable person, makes it clear she is not free to leave. A person can be "under arrest" even though the police have not announced it; nor are handcuffs or physical restraint necessary. Questioning an arrested person about her involvement in or knowledge of a crime must be preceded by the Miranda warnings if the police intend to use the answers against the person in a criminal case. If the arrested person chooses to remain silent, the questioning must stop.
  21. The act of seizing; the state of being seized or detained by legal authority. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  22. Stoppage: seizure by warrant. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  23. An arresting; a stop, check, or stay; seizure by legal authority. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  24. Stoppage by seizure; hindrance; interruption; a legal caption or seizure of the person; a mangy humour on the hind legs of a horse. Arrest of judgment, the staying or stopping of a judgment after verdict, for causes assigned. See Rest. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  25. Hindrance; restraint; seizure by authority. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.

What are the misspellings for arrest?

Usage examples for arrest

  1. I made an effort to arrest you in the garden; I did my duty, and was glad you escaped. – Hugh Wynne, Free Quaker by S. Weir Mitchell
  2. They have certainly sent out the constables to arrest us. – Marie Antoinette And Her Son by Louise Muhlbach Official
X