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Definitions of sweep

  1. sweep with a broom or as if with a broom; "Sweep the crumbs off the table"; "Sweep under the bed" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. sweep across or over; "Her long skirt brushed the floor"; "A gasp swept cross the audience" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. someone who cleans soot from chimneys Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. force into some kind of situation, condition, or course of action; "They were swept up by the events"; "don't drag me into this business" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. (football) an attempt to advance the ball by running around the end of the line Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. a wide scope; "the sweep of the plains" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. move with sweeping, effortless, gliding motions; "The diva swept into the room"; "Shreds of paper sailed through the air"; "The searchlights swept across the sky" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. winning all or all but one of the tricks in bridge Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. cover the entire range of Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. a movement in an arc; "a sweep of his arm" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. a long oar used in an open boat Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  12. win an overwhelming victory in or on; "Her new show dog swept all championships" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  13. clean by sweeping; "Please sweep the floor" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  14. make a big sweeping gesture or movement Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  15. (American football) an attempt to advance the ball by running around the end of the line Wordnet Dictionary DB
  16. to cover or extend over an area or time period; "Rivers traverse the valley floor", "The parking lot spans 3 acres"; "The novel spans three centuries" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  17. To pass a broom across (a surface) so as to remove loose dirt, dust, etc.; to brush, or rub over, with a broom for the purpose of cleaning; as, to sweep a floor, the street, or a chimney. Used also figuratively. Newage Dictionary DB
  18. To drive or carry along or off with a broom or a brush, or as if with a broom; to remove by, or as if by, brushing; as, to sweep dirt from a floor; the wind sweeps the snow from the hills; a freshet sweeps away a dam, timber, or rubbish; a pestilence sweeps off multitudes. Newage Dictionary DB
  19. To brush against or over; to rub lightly along. Newage Dictionary DB
  20. To carry with a long, swinging, or dragging motion; hence, to carry in a stately or proud fashion. Newage Dictionary DB
  21. To strike with a long stroke. Newage Dictionary DB
  22. To draw or drag something over; as, to sweep the bottom of a river with a net. Newage Dictionary DB
  23. To pass over, or traverse, with the eye or with an instrument of observation; as, to sweep the heavens with a telescope. Newage Dictionary DB
  24. To clean rooms, yards, etc., or to clear away dust, dirt, litter, etc., with a broom, brush, or the like. Newage Dictionary DB
  25. To brush swiftly over the surface of anything; to pass with switness and force, as if brushing the surface of anything; to move in a stately manner; as, the wind sweeps across the plain; a woman sweeps through a drawing-room. Newage Dictionary DB
  26. To pass over anything comprehensively; to range through with rapidity; as, his eye sweeps through space. Newage Dictionary DB
  27. The act of sweeping. Newage Dictionary DB
  28. The compass or range of a stroke; as, a long sweep. Newage Dictionary DB
  29. The compass of any turning body or of any motion; as, the sweep of a door; the sweep of the eye. Newage Dictionary DB
  30. The compass of anything flowing or brushing; as, the flood carried away everything within its sweep. Newage Dictionary DB
  31. Violent and general destruction; as, the sweep of an epidemic disease. Newage Dictionary DB
  32. Direction and extent of any motion not rectlinear; as, the sweep of a compass. Newage Dictionary DB
  33. Direction or departure of a curve, a road, an arch, or the like, away from a rectlinear line. Newage Dictionary DB
  34. One who sweeps; a sweeper; specifically, a chimney sweeper. Newage Dictionary DB
  35. A movable templet for making molds, in loam molding. Newage Dictionary DB
  36. The mold of a ship when she begins to curve in at the rungheads; any part of a ship shaped in a segment of a circle. Newage Dictionary DB
  37. A large oar used in small vessels, partly to propel them and partly to steer them. Newage Dictionary DB
  38. The almond furnace. Newage Dictionary DB
  39. A long pole, or piece of timber, moved on a horizontal fulcrum fixed to a tall post and used to raise and lower a bucket in a well for drawing water. Newage Dictionary DB
  40. In the game of casino, a pairing or combining of all the cards on the board, and so removing them all; in whist, the winning of all the tricks (thirteen) in a hand; a slam. Newage Dictionary DB
  41. The sweeping of workshops where precious metals are worked, containing filings, etc. Newage Dictionary DB
  42. To brush or clean with a broom, etc.; remove or clean away with a broom, etc.; as, to sweep up the dirt; flow over or carry along or off with force; as, waves swept the deck; the wind swept the house away; to move with a brushing motion; as, she swept her skirts aside. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  43. To clean or clear away dirt with a brush, broom, etc.; to pass with speed or force; move with stateliness or dignity. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  44. The act of sweeping; a clearing out or away; as, to make a clean sweep; range; extent; as, the sweep of a storm; a bend or curve; as, the sweep of a drive; rapid survey with the eye; one who cleans chimneys; a long oar. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  45. Sweeper. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  46. Swept. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  47. Sweeping. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  48. To wipe or rub over with a brush or broom: to carry along or off by a long brushing stroke or force: to destroy or carry off at a stroke: to strike with a long stroke: to carry with pomp: to drag over: to pass rapidly over. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  49. To pass swiftly and forcibly: to pass with pomp: to move with a long reach:-pa.t. and pa.p. swept. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  50. Act of sweeping: extent of a stroke, or of anything turning or in motion: direction of a curve: a chimney-sweeper. -n SWEEPER. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  51. Act of sweeping; range of anything in motion; a large oar; one who sweeps. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  52. To pass swiftly; pass with pomp. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  53. To rub over or brush, as with a broom or brush; to carry off at a stroke; clear away; fire shot over or along; pass rapidly over. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  54. To collect or clear away with a broom. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  55. To move with a broad, swift action, as of a brush or broom. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  56. To brush a floor, etc., with a broom. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  57. To move with a strong, even action. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  58. The act or result of sweeping; a broad, strong, sustained movement, as of a river. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  59. Range, compass, extent of stroke, or of vision, etc.; a curve or bend, or something bent. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  60. A sweeper. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  61. The act of sweeping; the compass of a stroke; the compass of anything turning, flowing or brushing; violent and general destruction; direction of any motion not rectilinear; a pole or piece of timber moved on a fulcrum; a large oar, used in small vessels to impel them in a calm, &c.; a chimney-sweeper. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  62. To brush or rub over with a brush, broom or besom; to clean by brushing; to carry with a long swinging or dragging motion; to carry off with celerity and violence; to strike with a long stroke; to draw or drag over. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  63. To pass with swiftness and violence, as something broad or brushing the surface of anything; to pass over with celerity and force; to pass with pomp; to move with a long reach. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  64. sw[=e]p, v.t. to wipe or rub over with a brush or broom: to carry along or off by a long brushing stroke or force: to destroy or carry off at a stroke: to strike with a long stroke: to carry with pomp: to drag over: to pass rapidly over.--v.i. to pass swiftly and forcibly: to pass with pomp: to move with a long reach:--pa.t. and pa.p. swept.--n. act of sweeping: extent of a stroke, or of anything turning or in motion: prevalence, range: direction of a curve: the act of bringing into a general movement: rapid or wide-spread destructiveness: a curved approach before a building: a chimney-sweeper: (pl.) oars of great length used during a calm or in still water, either to assist the rudder or to propel the vessel.--n. SWEEP'ER.--adv. SWEEP'INGLY, in a sweeping manner.--n. SWEEP'INGNESS.--n.pl. SWEEP'INGS, things collected by sweeping: rubbish.--ns. SWEEP'-NET, a net that embraces a large compass: SWEEP'STAKE (Shak.), one who wins all--usually in pl. SWEEP'STAKES, a method of gambling by which several persons contribute each certain stakes, the whole of which fall to one in case of a certain event happening; SWEEP'-WASH'ER, one who scrapes a little gold or silver from the sweepings of refineries.--adj. SWEEP'Y, swaying, sweeping, curving. [A.S. swápan; Ger. schweifen, Cf. Swoop.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  65. (swept), & n. Glide swiftly, speed along with impetuous unchecked motion, go majestically, extend (intr.) in continuous curve or line or slope, (eagle sweeps past; wind sweeps along; cavalry sweeps down on the enemy; she swept out of the room; his glance sweeps from right to left; with a sweeping stroke; coast sweeps northward; plain sweeps away to the sea); (part.) of wide range, regardless of limitations or exceptions, (sweeping remark, generalization, &c.), whence sweepingly adv., sweepingness n.; impart sweeping motion to, carry along or down or away or off in impetuous course, clear off or away or out of existence &c. or from, (swept his hand across; river sweeps away bridge, sweeps logs down with it; was swept away by an avalanche; the plague swept off thousands; s. away slavery, feudalism, abolish swiftly; he swept his audience along with him, won enthusiastic support; s. all obstacles from one\'s path); traverse or range swiftly, pass lightly across or along, pass eyes or hand quickly along or over, scan, scour, graze, (s. the seas, traverse in all directions, & see below; wind sweeps the hillside; s. the strings, lute, &c., of hand or its owner; s. the horizon, of eyes or their owner; s. river-bottom &c., drag it to find something; dress sweeps the ground); (of artillery &c.) include in line of fire, cover, enfilade, rake, (battery sweeps the approaches, glacis, street); clear everything from, clear of dust or soot or litter with broom (often up), gather up or collect (as) with broom, push away &c. (as) with broom, (s. the seas, drive all enemies from them, & see above; s. floor, carpet, chimney; s. up the room; s. away the snow; swept& garnished, generally renovated, w. ref. to Luke xi. 25; s. the board, win all the money on gaming-table, & transf. win all possible prizes &c.; s. a constituency &c., receive nearly all votes, have large majority; sweeps everything into his net, seizes all that comes; s. up litter &c., whence sweeping (2) n. usu. in pl.); propel (barge &c.) with ss.; s.-net, long fishing-net, also entomologist\'s net; s.-seine, large seine; sweepstake (s), form of gambling on horse-races &c. in which the sum composed of participators\' stakes goes to the drawer (s) of winning or placed horse (s) &c.; hence (-)sweeper (1, 2) n. (N.) sweeping motion or extension, curve in road &c., piece of curving road &c., (with a s. of his arm, eyes, scythe; a s. of mountain country; river makes a great s. to the left; house is approached by a fine s. or carriage s.); range or compass of something that has sweeping motion (within, beyond, the s. of the scythe, net, telescope, eye, human intelligence); act of sweeping (as) with broom (give it a thorough s. or s.-up or s.-out; make a clean s., have complete riddance of old furniture, officials, &c.); long oar worked by standing rower (s) on barge, becalmed sailing-ship, &c. (had to get out the ss.); long pole mounted as lever for raising bucket from well; man who sweeps chimneys (often chimney-s.). [middle English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  66. A movable template for making moulds in sand, etc. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  67. n. Act of sweeping ;-compass of a stroke ;-compass of any turning body or motion ;-compass of any thing flowing or brushing ;-violent and general destruction ;-direction and extent of any motion not rectilinear;- one who sweeps ; a sweeper; among seamen, a long, stout oar used to propel small vessels in a calm or light wind;-a military engine for projecting stones into a besieged city;-a sweepstake. Cabinet Dictionary

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