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Definitions of sweep

  1. To pass with swiftness and violence, as something broad or brushing the surface of anything; to pass over with celerity and force; to pass with pomp; to move with a long reach. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  2. To brush or clean with a broom, etc.; remove or clean away with a broom, etc.; as, to sweep up the dirt; flow over or carry along or off with force; as, waves swept the deck; the wind swept the house away; to move with a brushing motion; as, she swept her skirts aside. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  3. To wipe or rub over with a brush or broom: to carry along or off by a long brushing stroke or force: to destroy or carry off at a stroke: to strike with a long stroke: to carry with pomp: to drag over: to pass rapidly over. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  4. To rub over or brush, as with a broom or brush; to carry off at a stroke; clear away; fire shot over or along; pass rapidly over. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  5. To collect or clear away with a broom. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  6. To move with a broad, swift action, as of a brush or broom. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  7. To clean or clear away dirt with a brush, broom, etc.; to pass with speed or force; move with stateliness or dignity. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  8. To pass swiftly and forcibly: to pass with pomp: to move with a long reach:-pa.t. and pa.p. swept. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  9. sweep with a broom or as if with a broom; "Sweep the crumbs off the table"; "Sweep under the bed" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. cover the entire range of Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. win an overwhelming victory in or on; "Her new show dog swept all championships" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  12. clean by sweeping; "Please sweep the floor" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  13. To brush a floor, etc., with a broom. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  14. To move with a strong, even action. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  15. To brush or rub over with a brush, broom or besom; to clean by brushing; to carry with a long swinging or dragging motion; to carry off with celerity and violence; to strike with a long stroke; to draw or drag over. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  16. Sweeping. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  17. someone who cleans soot from chimneys Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  18. a movement in an arc; "a sweep of his arm" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  19. (American football) an attempt to advance the ball by running around the end of the line Wordnet Dictionary DB
  20. to cover or extend over an area or time period; "Rivers traverse the valley floor", "The parking lot spans 3 acres"; "The novel spans three centuries" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  21. To pass a broom across (a surface) so as to remove loose dirt, dust, etc.; to brush, or rub over, with a broom for the purpose of cleaning; as, to sweep a floor, the street, or a chimney. Used also figuratively. Newage Dictionary DB
  22. To drive or carry along or off with a broom or a brush, or as if with a broom; to remove by, or as if by, brushing; as, to sweep dirt from a floor; the wind sweeps the snow from the hills; a freshet sweeps away a dam, timber, or rubbish; a pestilence sweeps off multitudes. Newage Dictionary DB
  23. To brush against or over; to rub lightly along. Newage Dictionary DB
  24. To carry with a long, swinging, or dragging motion; hence, to carry in a stately or proud fashion. Newage Dictionary DB
  25. To strike with a long stroke. Newage Dictionary DB
  26. To draw or drag something over; as, to sweep the bottom of a river with a net. Newage Dictionary DB
  27. To pass over, or traverse, with the eye or with an instrument of observation; as, to sweep the heavens with a telescope. Newage Dictionary DB
  28. To clean rooms, yards, etc., or to clear away dust, dirt, litter, etc., with a broom, brush, or the like. Newage Dictionary DB
  29. To brush swiftly over the surface of anything; to pass with switness and force, as if brushing the surface of anything; to move in a stately manner; as, the wind sweeps across the plain; a woman sweeps through a drawing-room. Newage Dictionary DB
  30. To pass over anything comprehensively; to range through with rapidity; as, his eye sweeps through space. Newage Dictionary DB
  31. The act of sweeping. Newage Dictionary DB
  32. The compass or range of a stroke; as, a long sweep. Newage Dictionary DB
  33. The compass of any turning body or of any motion; as, the sweep of a door; the sweep of the eye. Newage Dictionary DB
  34. The compass of anything flowing or brushing; as, the flood carried away everything within its sweep. Newage Dictionary DB
  35. Violent and general destruction; as, the sweep of an epidemic disease. Newage Dictionary DB
  36. Direction and extent of any motion not rectlinear; as, the sweep of a compass. Newage Dictionary DB
  37. Direction or departure of a curve, a road, an arch, or the like, away from a rectlinear line. Newage Dictionary DB
  38. One who sweeps; a sweeper; specifically, a chimney sweeper. Newage Dictionary DB
  39. A movable templet for making molds, in loam molding. Newage Dictionary DB
  40. The mold of a ship when she begins to curve in at the rungheads; any part of a ship shaped in a segment of a circle. Newage Dictionary DB
  41. A large oar used in small vessels, partly to propel them and partly to steer them. Newage Dictionary DB
  42. The almond furnace. Newage Dictionary DB
  43. A long pole, or piece of timber, moved on a horizontal fulcrum fixed to a tall post and used to raise and lower a bucket in a well for drawing water. Newage Dictionary DB
  44. In the game of casino, a pairing or combining of all the cards on the board, and so removing them all; in whist, the winning of all the tricks (thirteen) in a hand; a slam. Newage Dictionary DB
  45. The sweeping of workshops where precious metals are worked, containing filings, etc. Newage Dictionary DB
  46. The act of sweeping; a clearing out or away; as, to make a clean sweep; range; extent; as, the sweep of a storm; a bend or curve; as, the sweep of a drive; rapid survey with the eye; one who cleans chimneys; a long oar. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  47. Sweeper. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  48. Act of sweeping: extent of a stroke, or of anything turning or in motion: direction of a curve: a chimney-sweeper. -n SWEEPER. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  49. Act of sweeping; range of anything in motion; a large oar; one who sweeps. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  50. The act or result of sweeping; a broad, strong, sustained movement, as of a river. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  51. Range, compass, extent of stroke, or of vision, etc.; a curve or bend, or something bent. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  52. A sweeper. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  53. The act of sweeping; the compass of a stroke; the compass of anything turning, flowing or brushing; violent and general destruction; direction of any motion not rectilinear; a pole or piece of timber moved on a fulcrum; a large oar, used in small vessels to impel them in a calm, &c.; a chimney-sweeper. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  54. Swept. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.

Usage examples for sweep

  1. Best of all to Beth's way of thinking, there was a little sweep to it. – That Little Girl of Miss Eliza’s by Jean K. Baird
  2. At the thought of her he felt a second flush of shame sweep up in him, quite different from the first and quite horrible. – Foe-Farrell by Arthur Thomas Quiller-Couch
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