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Definitions of faint

  1. pass out from weakness, physical or emotional distress due to a loss of blood supply to the brain Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. lacking clarity or distinctness; "a dim figure in the distance"; "only a faint recollection"; "shadowy figures in the gloom"; "saw a vague outline of a building through the fog"; "a few wispy memories of childhood" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. a spontaneous loss of consciousness caused by insufficient blood to the brain Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. lacking conviction or boldness or courage; "faint heart ne'er won fair lady" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. indistinctly understood or felt or perceived; "a faint clue to the origin of the mystery"; "haven't the faintest idea" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. barely perceptible; lacking clarity or brightness or loudness etc; "a faint outline"; "the wan sun cast faint shadows"; "the faint light of a distant candle"; "faint colors"; "a faint hissing sound"; "a faint aroma" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. lacking strength or vigor; "damning with faint praise"; "faint resistance"; "feeble efforts"; "a feeble voice" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. weak and likely to lose consciousness; "suddenly felt faint from the pain"; "was sick and faint from hunger"; "felt light in the head"; "a swooning fit"; "light-headed with wine"; "light-headed from lack of sleep" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. Lacking strength; weak; languid; inclined to swoon; as, faint with fatigue, hunger, or thirst. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. Wanting in courage, spirit, or energy; timorous; cowardly; dejected; depressed; as, "Faint heart ne'er won fair lady." Newage Dictionary DB
  11. Lacking distinctness; hardly perceptible; striking the senses feebly; not bright, or loud, or sharp, or forcible; weak; as, a faint color, or sound. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. Performed, done, or acted, in a weak or feeble manner; not exhibiting vigor, strength, or energy; slight; as, faint efforts; faint resistance. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. The act of fainting, or the state of one who has fainted; a swoon. [R.] See Fainting, n. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. To sink into dejection; to lose courage or spirit; to become depressed or despondent. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. To decay; to disappear; to vanish. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. To cause to faint or become dispirited; to depress; to weaken. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. A swoon. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  18. Wanting in courage, spirit, or energy; timorous; cowardly; dejected; depressed; as, heart ne'er won fair lady. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. To become weak or wanting in vigor; to grow feeble; to lose strength and color, and the control of the bodily or mental functions; to swoon; - sometimes with away. See Fainting, n. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. To become feeble; lose consciousness; swoon; lose courage. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  21. Feeble; languid; depressed; spiritless; not bright or vivid in color; not loud or clear. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  22. A sudden loss of consciousness. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  23. 1. Extremely weak, threatened with syncope. 2. An attack of syncope. A practical medical dictionary. By Stedman, Thomas Lathrop. Published 1920.
  24. Syncope; weakness. Warner's pocket medical dictionary of today. By William R. Warner. Published 1898.
  25. Wanting in strength; fading; lacking distinctness; not bright or forcible; weak in spirit; lacking courage; depressed; done in a feeble way. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  26. To become feeble or weak; to lose strength, color, etc.; to swoon; to fade or decay; to vanish; to lose courage or spirit; to become depressed. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  27. FAINTLY. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  28. Faintness. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  29. To become weak; swoon. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  30. Weak; feeble; indistinct; dispirited; inclined to swoon. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  31. To swoon; become spiritless; despond; grow weak; fade; vanish. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  32. Despondent; timid; weak. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  33. Indistinct; feeble; dim. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  34. Weak; feeble; enfeebled with exhaustion; inclined to swoon; not bright or vivid; not loud; not striking; cowardly; not vigorous; not active; dejected; depressed. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  35. To become feeble; to lose strength and colour and become senseless and motionless; to swoon; to lose courage or spirit; to decay; to vanish. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  36. Weak; exhausted; inclined to swoon; not bright, as a colour; not loud; timorous; cowardly; slight or imperfect, as a faint resemblance, a faint smell. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  37. To swoon; to be weak; to become weary; to become senseless and motionless; to sink into dejection; to lose courage. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  38. To become weak or wanting in vigor; to grow feeble; to lose strength and color, and the control of the bodily or mental functions; to swoon; -- sometimes with away. See Fainting, n. mso.anu.edu.au
  39. f[=a]nt, adj. wanting in strength: fading: lacking distinctness: not bright or forcible: weak in spirit: lacking courage: depressed: done in a feeble way.--v.i. to become feeble or weak: to lose strength, colour, &c.: to swoon: to fade or decay: to vanish: to lose courage or spirit: to become depressed.--v.t. (rare) to render faint.--n. a swoon.--p.adj. FAINT'ED (Milt.), exhausted.--adjs. FAINT'-HEART, FAINT'-HEART'ED, cowardly: timorous.--adv. FAINT'-HEART'EDLY.--ns. FAINT'-HEART'EDNESS; FAINT'ING.--adj. FAINT'ISH, slightly faint.--n. FAINT'ISHNESS.--adv. FAINT'LY.--n. FAINT'NESS, want of strength: feebleness of colour, light, &c.: dejection.--adj. FAINT'Y, faintish. [O. Fr. feint (Fr. feindre), feigned--L. fing[)e]re, to feign.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  40. Sluggish; timid (f. -heart, coward; so faint-hearted a., faint-heartedly adv., faint-heartedness n.); feeble (a f. show of resistance); dim, indistinct, pale (f. or feint lines, ruled f. or feint, of paper with lines to guide writing; a f. idea, inadequate); giddy or languid with fear, hunger, &c., inclined to swoon; (of air, scents, &c.) sickly, oppressive. Hence faintish (2) a., faintly adv., faintness n. [old French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  41. Lose courage, give way, (archaic); swoon (v. & n.; fainted away; in a dead f., utterly insensible). Concise Oxford Dictionary
  42. Same as Syncope. American pocket medical dictionary.
  43. A sudden temporary loss of consciousness. Appleton's medical dictionary.
  44. To lose the animal functions, to sink motionless; to grow feeble; to sink into dejection. Complete Dictionary
  45. To deject, to depress, to enfeeble. Complete Dictionary
  46. Languid; not bright; not loud; feeble of body; cowardly; depressed; not vigorous, not active. Complete Dictionary

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