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Definitions of join

  1. the shape or manner in which things come together and a connection is made Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. make contact or come together; "The two roads join here" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. become part of; become a member of a group or organization; "He joined the Communist Party as a young man" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. be or become joined or united or linked; "The two streets connect to become a highway"; "Our paths joined"; "The travelers linked up again at the airport" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. a set containing all and only the members of two or more given sets; "let C be the union of the sets A and B" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. come into the company of; "She joined him for a drink" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. cause to become joined or linked; "join these two parts so that they fit together" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  8. To bring together, literally or figuratively; to place in contact; to connect; to couple; to unite; to combine; to associate; to add; to append. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. To associate one's self to; to be or become connected with; to league one's self with; to unite with; as, to join a party; to join the church. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. To unite in marriage. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. To enjoin upon; to command. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. To accept, or engage in, as a contest; as, to join encounter, battle, issue. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. To be contiguous, close, or in contact; to come together; to unite; to mingle; to form a union; as, the hones of the skull join; two rivers join. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. The line joining two points; the point common to two intersecting lines. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. To unite; connect; to make act, hold, appear, etc., together as one; add or annex; become connected with; as, to join a club; to unite in marriage. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  16. Be in contact; become associated or united. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  17. To connect: to unite: to associate: to add or annex. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  18. To be connected with: to grow together: to be in close contact: to unite (with). The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  19. To meet; be associated; concur. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  20. To unite; associate. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  21. To put together; unite; connect; combine. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  22. To engage in (battle, etc.) together. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  23. Joinery. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  24. To connect; to unite; to associate; to engage in; to enter; to annex. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  25. To grow to; to adhere; to be contiguous or in contact; to unite with in marriage, league, confederacy, partnership, or society. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  26. To connect; to couple; to bring into close union; to unite. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  27. join, v.t. to connect: to unite: to associate: to add or annex.--v.i. to be connected with: to grow together: to be in close contact: to unite (with).--ns. JOIND'ER, joining; JOIN'ER, one who joins or unites: a carpenter; JOIN'ERY, the art of the joiner; JOIN'-HAND, running hand; JOIN'ING, the act of joining: a seam: a joint; JOINT, a joining: the place where, or mode in which, two or more things join, as two rails, two pieces of timber connected by mortises and tenons, &c.: the flexible hinge of cloth or leather connecting the back of a book with its sides: (geol.) a crack intersecting a mass of rock: a knot: a hinge: a seam: a place of resort for tramps: (U.S.) an opium-den: the place where two bones are joined: (cook.) the part of the limb of an animal cut off at the joint.--adj. joined, united, or combined: shared among more than one.--v.t. to unite by joints: to fit closely: to provide with joints: to cut into joints, as an animal.--v.i. to fit like joints.--adj. JOINT'ED, having joints.--ns. JOINT'ER, the largest kind of plane used by a joiner: a bent piece of iron for riveting two stones together; JOINT'ING-RULE, a long, straight-edged rule used by bricklayers for keeping their work even.--adv. JOINT'LY, in a joint manner: unitedly or in combination: together.--ns. JOINT'-OIL, the synovia, a viscid secretion for lubricating the articular surfaces; JOINT'-STOCK, stock held jointly or in company; JOINT'-STOOL (Shak.), a stool made of parts inserted in each other; JOINT'-TEN'ANCY, the ownership of land or goods along with one or more persons; JOINT'-TEN'ANT, one who is owner of land or goods along with others; JOINT'URE, property joined to or settled on a woman at marriage to be enjoyed after her husband's death.--v.t. to settle a jointure upon.--ns. JOINT'[=U]RESS, JOIN'TRESS, a woman on whom a jointure is settled.--JOIN BATTLE, to engage in battle.--OUT OF JOINT, dislocated, (fig.) disordered; PUT ONE'S NOSE OUT OF JOINT, to supplant in another's love or confidence; SECOND JOINT, the middle piece of a fly fishing-rod: the thigh of a fowl--opp. to the leg or drumstick, the first joint; UNIVERSAL JOINT, a contrivance by which one part of a machine is able to move freely in all directions, as in the ball-and-socket joint. [O. Fr. joindre--L. jung[)e]re, junctum.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  28. Put together, fasten, unite, (things, one to another); connect (two points) by straight line; unite (persons, one with or to another) in marriage, friendship, alliance, &c.; (intr.) come together, be united, (with, to, or abs.); take part with others (in doing); come into the company of (person); become member of (club &c.); take, resume, one\'s place in (regiment, ship, company, &c.); come into connexion with, as the Cherwell joins the Thames below Oxford; j. battle, begin fighting; j. hands, clasp one\'s hands together, clasp each other\'s hands, (fig.) combine in action or enterprise; j. ISSUE; (n.) point, line, of junction. [old French] Concise Oxford Dictionary

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