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Definitions of motion

  1. an optical illusion of motion produced by viewing a rapid succession of still pictures of a moving object; "the cinema relies on apparent motion"; "the succession of flashing lights gave an illusion of movement" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. show, express or direct through movement; "He gestured his desire to leave" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. the use of movements (especially of the hands) to communicate familiar or prearranged signals Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. a change of position that does not entail a change of location; "the reflex motion of his eyebrows revealed his surprise"; "movement is a sign of life"; "an impatient move of his hand"; "gastrointestinal motility" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. the act of changing your location from one place to another; "police controlled the motion of the crowd"; "the movement of people from the farms to the cities"; "his move put him directly in my path" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. a formal proposal for action made to a deliberative assembly for discussion and vote; "he made a motion to adjourn"; "she called for the question" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. a natural event that involves a change in the position or location of something Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. a state of change; "they were in a state of steady motion" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. the act of changing location from one place to another; "police controlled the motion of the crowd"; "the movement of people from the farms to the cities"; "his move put him directly in my path" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  10. Power of, or capacity for, motion. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. Direction of movement; course; tendency; as, the motion of the planets is from west to east. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. Change in the relative position of the parts of anything; action of a machine with respect to the relative movement of its parts. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. Movement of the mind, desires, or passions; mental act, or impulse to any action; internal activity. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. A proposal or suggestion looking to action or progress; esp., a formal proposal made in a deliberative assembly; as, a motion to adjourn. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. An application made to a court or judge orally in open court. Its object is to obtain an order or rule directing some act to be done in favor of the applicant. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. Change of pitch in successive sounds, whether in the same part or in groups of parts. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. A puppet show or puppet. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. To make a significant movement or gesture, as with the hand; as, to motion to one to take a seat. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. To make proposal; to offer plans. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. To direct or invite by a motion, as of the hand or head; as, to motion one to a seat. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. To propose; to move. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. During a lawsuit, a request to the judge for a decision--called an order or ruling--to resolve procedural or other issues that come up during litigation. For example, after receiving hundreds of irrelevant interrogatories, a party might file a motion asking that the other side be ordered to stop engaging in unduly burdensome discovery. A motion can be made before, during or after trial. Typically, one party submits a written motion to the court, at which point the other party has the opportunity to file a written response. The court then often schedules a hearing at which each side delivers a short oral argument. The court then approves or denies the motion. Most motions cannot be appealed until the case is over.
  23. The act, process, or state of changing place or position; movement; the passing of a body from one place or position to another, whether voluntary or involuntary; - opposed to rest. Webster Dictionary DB
  24. Physical motion, i.e., a change in position of a body or subject as a result of an external force. It is distinguished from MOVEMENT, a process resulting from biological activity. Medical Dictionary DB
  25. The act, process, or state of changing place; the changing of position; a gesture; action, as opposed to rest; impulse or desire; a formal proposal made in a meeting of a society, etc.; as, a motion to adjourn is in order. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  26. To make a movement or gesture full of meaning; as, to motion to someone to come forward. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  27. To guide or invite by a gesture; as, to motion someone to come forward. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  28. Motionless. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  29. 1. Movement, change of place. 2. Specifically, a movement of the bowels, defecation. 3. The matter discharged from the rectum, a stool. A practical medical dictionary. By Stedman, Thomas Lathrop. Published 1920.
  30. Act of moving from place to place. Fecal discharge. Warner's pocket medical dictionary of today. By William R. Warner. Published 1898.
  31. The act or state of moving: a single movement: change of posture: gait: power of motion: excitement of the mind: proposal made, esp. in an assembly:-in pl. (B.) impulses. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  32. To make a significant movement. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  33. Act or state of moving; proposal. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  34. To make a movement. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  35. Change of position; a movement; gesture. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  36. A proposition to be voted on. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  37. Act of moving; change of position; the passing of a body from one place to another; a movement; power of movement; impulse: a proposition made in a deliberative assembly; action of the bowels. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  38. To make a significant movement or gesture, as with the hand; to make proposals. See Move. Motion in court, an occasional application of the court, by the parties or their counsel, for the purpose of obtaining some rule or order of court which becomes necessary in the progress of a cause. Quantity of motion, the product of the mass or moving body by the velocity. Absolute motion, that which is independent of any other motion or retarding power. Angular motion, the motion of a body as referred to a centre about which it revolves. Accelerated motions, those which are continually increasing or diminishing in velocity, while equable motion continues uniform. Laws of motion, three axioms, which have been shown by Sir Isaac Newton, as follows:- (1) every body perseveres in its state of rest, or uniform motion in a straight line, until a change is effected by the agency of some external force; (2) any change effected in the quiescence or motion of a body, is in the direction of the force impressed, and is proportional to it in quantity; and (3) action and reaction are equal and in contrary directions. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  39. Change of place or of local position; animal life and action; the passing of a body from one place to another, as opposed to rest; manner of moving the body; change of posture; impulse communicated; tendency of the mind; internal action, as of the bowels; a proposal made at a meeting or an assembly; in a locomotive engine, the cross-head, cross-head guides, and the blocks, taken as a whole, are called "the motion". Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  40. To make a significant movement with the hands. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  41. The act, process, or state of changing place or position; movement; the passing of a body from one place or position to another, whether voluntary or involuntary; -- opposed to rest. mso.anu.edu.au
  42. In practice. An occasional application to a court by the parties or their counsel, in order to obtain some rule or order, which becomes necessary either in the progress of a cause, or summarily and wholly unconnected with plenary proceedings. Citizens’ St. R. Co. v. Reed, 28 Ind. App. G29, 63 N. E. 770; Low v. Cheney, 3 IIow. Prac. (N. Y.) 2S7; People v. Ah Sam, 41 Cal. 045; In re Jetter, 78 N. Y. 601. A motion is a written application for an order addressed to the court or to a judge in vacation by any party to a suit or proceeding, or by any one interested therein. Rev. Code Iowa 1SS0, thelawdictionary.org
  43. The act, process, or state of changing place or position; movement; the passing of a body from one place or position to another, whether voluntary or involuntary; opposed to rest. dictgcide_fs
  44. m[=o]'shun, n. the act or state of moving: a single movement: change of posture: gait: power of moving or of being moved: angular velocity--direct when from west to east; retrograde when from east to west: excitement of the mind: any natural impulse, instigation: proposal made, esp. in an assembly: an application to a court, during a case before it, for an order or rule that something be done, esp. something incidental to the progress of the cause rather than its issue: evacuation of the intestine: (pl., B.) impulses.--v.i. to make a significant movement, to offer a proposal.--v.t. to guide by a gesture, &c.: to move.--adj. M[=O]'TILE, capable of spontaneous motion.--n. MOTIL'ITY.--adj. MO'TIONAL, characterised by motions.--n. M[=O]'TIONIST, one who makes a motion.--adj. M[=O]'TIONLESS, without motion.--ABSOLUTE MOTION, change of absolute place; ACCELERATED MOTION, motion of which the velocity is continually increasing; ANGULAR MOTION, motion regarded as measured by the increase of the angle made with some standard direction by a line drawn from the moving object to a fixed point; LAWS OF MOTION, Newton's three laws: (1) Every body continues in its state of rest, or of uniform motion in a straight line, except so far as it may be compelled by force to change that state; (2) Change of motion is proportional to force applied, and takes place in the direction of the straight line in which the force acts; (3) To every action there is always an equal and contrary reaction; PARALLEL MOTION (see PARALLEL); PERPETUAL MOTION (see PERPETUAL); QUANTITY OF MOTION, momentum. [Fr.,--L.,--mov[=e]re, m[=o]tum, to move.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  45. The act of changing place. The various motions may be divided into, - First, the voluntary or those that are executed under the influence of the brain. Secondly, the involuntary, which may be subdivided into, 1. The excited, of the reflex function of Dr. Marshall Hall and others, - as the closure of the larynx on the contact of acrid vapours, of the pharynx on that of the food, - a function of the spinal marrow; and, 2. Those that are executed under the organic and other nerves of involuntary function. It is probable, too, that every living tissue is capable of moving responsive to its appropriate irritant. See Irritability. Medical Lexicon. A Dictionary of Medical Science
  46. [Latin] The act of moving or of changing the place, attitude, or direction. M. of the bowels (or simply M.), a discharge of fecal matter from the bowels; also the matter discharged; a stool. na
  47. Moving, change of place; manner of moving the body in walking &c.; change of posture; gesture; in m., moving, not at rest; put in m., set going or working; formal proposal in deliberative assembly; (Law) application by party &c. for rule or order of court; evacuation of bowels; piece of moving mechanism. Hence motional, motionless, aa. [French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  48. Direct (person to, towards, away, &c., to do) by sign or gesture; make gesture make gesture (to person) directing him (to do). Concise Oxford Dictionary
  49. The act of moving. Appleton's medical dictionary.
  50. Continuous change of place or position. [Lat.] Appleton's medical dictionary.
  51. n. [Latin] Act or process of changing place; movement, as opposed to rest;- animal life and action; - manner of moving the body; port; gait; air;- military march; advance or retreat;- agitation, as of the sea;- internal action; excitement, as of the breast; hence, tumult; stir; commotion;- impulse communicated; impetus;- direction; tendency;- evacuation of the bowels;- proposal made in a deliberative assembly or public meeting. Cabinet Dictionary

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