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Definitions of sentence

  1. pronounce a sentence on, in a court of law; "He was condemned to ten years in prison" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. (criminal law) a final judgment of guilty in a criminal case and the punishment that is imposed; "the conviction came as no surprise" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. the period of time a prisoner is imprisoned; "he served a prison term of 15 months"; "his sentence was 5 to 10 years"; "he is doing time in the county jail" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. a string of words satisfying the grammatical rules of a language; "he always spoke in grammatical sentences" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. pronounce a sentence on (somebody) in a court of law; "He was condemned to ten years in prison" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  6. Sense; meaning; significance. Webster Dictionary DB
  7. An opinion; a decision; a determination; a judgment, especially one of an unfavorable nature. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. A philosophical or theological opinion; a dogma; as, Summary of the Sentences; Book of the Sentences. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. In civil and admiralty law, the judgment of a court pronounced in a cause; in criminal and ecclesiastical courts, a judgment passed on a criminal by a court or judge; condemnation pronounced by a judgical tribunal; doom. In common law, the term is exclusively used to denote the judgment in criminal cases. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. A short saying, usually containing moral instruction; a maxim; an axiom; a saw. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. A combination of words which is complete as expressing a thought, and in writing is marked at the close by a period, or full point. See Proposition, 4. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. To pass or pronounce judgment upon; to doom; to condemn to punishment; to prescribe the punishment of. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. To decree or announce as a sentence. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. To utter sententiously. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. Punishment in a criminal case. A sentence can range from a fine and community service to life imprisonment or death. For most crimes, the sentence is chosen by the trial judge; the jury chooses the sentence only in a capital case, when it must choose between life in prison without parole and death.
  16. Judgment, opinion, or decision; judgment pronounced by a court; a series of words containing a subject and a predicate, and expressing a thought completely. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  17. To condemn by judgment of a court. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  18. Opinion: a judgment pronounced on a criminal by a court or judge: a maxim: (gram.) a number of words containing a complete thought. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  19. To pronounce judgment on: to condemn. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  20. Judgment pronounced; maxim; period in writing. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  21. To pass sentence upon. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  22. A group of words expressing a complete thought. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  23. A legal judgment. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  24. A determination; opinion. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  25. A maxim. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  26. An opinion; a judgement pronounced by a judge; judicial decision; a maxim; a number of words containing complete sense. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  27. To pronounce judgement on; to doom. See Sense. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  28. The judgment pronounced on a criminal by a judge; the degree or judgment of a court; a maxim; an opinion; a series of words so arranged as to convey complete sense, and followed by a dot or full point, thus (.). Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  29. To pass judgment on, as a court; to doom; to condemn. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  30. In civil and admiralty law, the judgment of a court pronounced in a cause; in criminal and ecclesiastical courts, a judgment passed on a criminal by a court or judge; condemnation pronounced by a judicial tribunal; doom. In common law, the term is exclusively used to denote the judgment in criminal cases. dictgcide_fs
  31. sen'tens, n. opinion: a judgment pronounced on a criminal by a court or judge: a maxim: (gram.) a number of words containing a complete thought: sense: meaning: matter.--v.t. to pronounce judgment on: to condemn.--n. SEN'TENCER, one who sentences.--adj. SENTEN'TIAL, pertaining to a sentence: comprising sentences.--adv. SENTEN'TIALLY.--adj. SENTEN'TIOUS, abounding with sentences or maxims: short and pithy in expression: bombastic, or affected in speech.--adv. SENTEN'TIOUSLY.--n. SENTEN'TIOUSNESS, brevity with strength.--MASTER OF THE SENTENCES, the great 12th-century schoolman, Peter Lombard (died 1160), from his work Sententiarum Libri IV., an arranged collection of sentences from Augustine, &c. [Fr.,--L. sententia--sent[=i]re, to feel.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  32. (Archaic) one\'s opinion for or against some course or conclusion (my s. is for war); (archaic) pithy saying, briefly expressed thought, maxim, proverb, so (in common use) sententious a., sententiously adv., sententiousness n.; verdict (rare), (declaration of) punishment allotted to person condemned in criminal trial (also transf.); (Gram.) set of words complete in itself, containing subject& predicate (either, or part of either or both, somet. omitted by ellipsis), & conveying a statement, question, or command (e.g. I go, will you go?, go= go thou or you, what? = what did you say?, hearts trumps= hearts are trumps; simple s., with single subject& predicate; compound s., with more than one of either or both; complex s., with subordinate clause or clauses), so sentential a. (rare); (loosely in Gram.; usu. subordinate s.) subordinate clause; small amount of speech, usu. that between two full stops often including several grammatical sentences (e. g. I went& he came). (Vb) state s. of (condemned criminal, or transf.), declare condemned to. [old French] Concise Oxford Dictionary

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