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Definitions of signal

  1. be a signal for or a symptom of; "These symptoms indicate a serious illness"; "Her behavior points to a severe neurosis"; "The economic indicators signal that the euro is undervalued" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. any communication that encodes a message; "signals from the boat suddenly stopped" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. communicate silently and non-verbally by signals or signs; "He signed his disapproval with a dismissive hand gesture"; "The diner signaled the waiters to bring the menu" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. any incitement to action; "he awaited the signal to start"; "the victory was a signal for wild celebration" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. an electric quantity (voltage or current or field strength) whose modulation represents coded information about the source from which it comes Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. notably out of the ordinary; "the year saw one signal triumph for the Labour party" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. A sign made for the purpose of giving notice to a person of some occurence, command, or danger; also, a sign, event, or watchword, which has been agreed upon as the occasion of concerted action. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. A token; an indication; a foreshadowing; a sign. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. Noticeable; distinguished from what is ordinary; eminent; remarkable; memorable; as, a signal exploit; a signal service; a signal act of benevolence. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. Of or pertaining to signals, or the use of signals in conveying information; as, a signal flag or officer. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. To communicate by signals; as, to signal orders. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. To notify by a signals; to make a signal or signals to; as, to signal a fleet to anchor. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. A sign agreed upon, or intended to be understood, for giving notice, as of danger, especially at a distance; a token. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  14. Extraordinary; distinguished from the commonplace by some mark or sign; remarkable; as, a signal success; pertaining to signals; as, a signal flag. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  15. To indicate by signs; make signs to. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  16. To make signs; to communicate with someone by means of flags, lights, etc. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  17. Signally. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  18. Signaler. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  19. A sign for giving notice, generally at a distance: token: the notice given. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  20. To make signals to: to convey by signals:-pr.p. signalling; pa.t. and pa.p. signalled. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  21. Having a sign: remarkable: notable: eminent. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  22. SIGNALLING. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  23. A sign to give notice; notice given. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  24. remarkable; notable. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  25. To make signals to; indicate by signals. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  26. To make signals to; communicate by signals. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  27. Remarkable; conspicuous. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  28. A sign agreed upon or understood, as conveying information. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  29. Signaling. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  30. Distinguished from what is ordinary; eminent; remarkable. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  31. A sign intended to give notice or communicate intelligence; the notice given. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  32. To announce by signal; to make signals to. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  33. To give signals. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  34. Anything employed to attract the eye of others at a distance; notice given. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  35. Distinguished from what is ordinary; memorable; notable. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  36. To convey by signals. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  37. A synchronous language by Le Guernic et al ofINRIA.["SIGNAL - A Data Flow-Oriented Language for SignalProcessing," P. le Guernic, IEEE Trans Acoustics Speech &Signal Proc, ASSP-34(2):362-1986-04-374]. foldoc_fs
  38. A predefined message sent between twoUnix processes or from the kernel to a process. Signalscommunicate the occurrence of unexpected external events suchas the forced termination of a process by the user. Eachsignal has a unique number associated with it and each processhas a signal handler set for each signal. Signals can be sentusing the kill system call. foldoc_fs
  39. A token; an indication; a foreshadowing; a sign; anything taken as evidence of some process. dictgcide_fs
  40. A measureable electrical quantity, such as voltage or current, that conveys information by varying in magnitude over time; as, the signals from the strongest commercial radio stations can be received over hundreds of miles. dictgcide_fs
  41. sig'nal, n. a sign for giving notice, generally at a distance: token: the notice given: any initial impulse.--v.t. and v.i. to make signals to: to convey by signals:--pr.p. sig'nalling; pa.t. and pa.p. sig'nalled.--adj. having a sign: remarkable: notable: eminent.--ns. SIG'NAL-BOOK, a book containing a system of signals; SIG'NAL-BOX, -CAB'IN, &c., a small house in which railway-signals are worked: the alarm-box of a police or fire-alarm system; SIG'NAL-CODE, a code or system of arbitrary signals, esp. at sea, by flags or lights; SIG'NAL-FIRE, a fire used for a signal; SIG'NAL-FLAG, a flag used in signalling, its colour, shape, markings, and combinations indicating various significations; SIG'NAL-GUN, a gun fired as a signal.--v.t. SIG'NALISE, to make signal or eminent: to signal.--ns. SIG'NAL-LAMP, a lamp by which signals are made by glasses or slides of different colours, &c.; SIG'NALLING, the means of transmitting intelligence to a greater or less distance by the agency of sight or hearing.--adv. SIG'NALLY.--ns. SIG'NALMAN, one who makes signals and who interprets those made; SIG'NALMENT, the act of communicating by signals: description by means of marks; SIG'NAL-POST, a pole on which movable flags, arms, lights, are displayed as signals; SIG'NAL-SER'VICE, the department in the army occupied with signalling. [Fr.,--L. signalis, signum.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  42. Remarkably good or bad, conspicuous, noteworthy, exemplary, condign, (s. victory, defeat, reward, punishment, virtue, example). Hence signally adv. [Latin] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  43. Preconcerted or intelligible sign conveying information or direction esp. to person (s) at a distance, message made up of such signs, (the s. was to be the dropping of a handkerchief; ss. are made by day with flags& by night with lights; gave the s. for advance; fog -s.; s. of distress, appeal for help, esp. from ship made by firing guns; storm-s., cone &c. hoisted at meteorological station; code of ss., s.-book, body of ss. arranged for sending complicated messages esp. in naval& mil. use); immediate occasion for some general movement (the earthquake was the s. for an outbreak of the primitive instincts); s.-box, hut on railway with signalling-apparatus; s.-man, signaller. (Vb) make signal (s), make signal (s), to, transmit (order, information) by s., announce (event, that) by s., direct (person to do) by s.; hence signaller n. [French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  44. n. [Latin] A sign which has been agreed upon to give notice of some occurrence, command, or danger, to a person at a distance, or as the occasion of conceited action;-hence, a token; an indication. Cabinet Dictionary

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