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Definitions of sink

  1. To fall towards the bottom; to subside; to fall gradually; to penetrate; to become lower; to settle to a level; to be overwhelmed; to enter deeply; to decline. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  2. To cause to sink; to put under water; to immerse or submerge in a fluid; as, to sink a ship. Webster Dictionary DB
  3. Figuratively: To cause to decline; to depress; to degrade; hence, to ruin irretrievably; to destroy, as by drowping; as, to sink one's reputation. Webster Dictionary DB
  4. To make (a depression) by digging, delving, or cutting, etc.; as, to sink a pit or a well; to sink a die. Webster Dictionary DB
  5. To bring low; to reduce in quantity; to waste. Webster Dictionary DB
  6. To conseal and appropriate. Webster Dictionary DB
  7. To keep out of sight; to suppress; to ignore. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. To reduce or extinguish by payment; as, to sink the national debt. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. To cause to go to the bottom; as, to sink ships; make by digging downward; as, to sink a well; place in the excavation made. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  10. To cause to sink: to put under water: to keep out of sight: to suppress: to degrade: to cause to decline or fall: to plunge into destruction: to make by digging or delving: to pay absolutely: to lower on value or amount: to lessen:-pa.t. sank and sunk: pa.p. sunk, sunken. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  11. To cause to sink; immerse; suppress; degrade. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  12. To submerge, as in water. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  13. To dig downward, as a well; cause to descend. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  14. To debase or degrade; diminish; depress; suppress. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  15. To fall by, or as by, the force of gravity; to descend lower and lower; to decline gradually; to subside; as, a stone sinks in water; waves rise and sink; the sun sinks in the west. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. To enter deeply; to fall or retire beneath or below the surface; to penetrate. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. Hence, to enter so as to make an abiding impression; to enter completely. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. To be overwhelmed or depressed; to fall slowly, as so the ground, from weakness or from an overburden; to fail in strength; to decline; to decay; to decrease. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. To decrease in volume, as a river; to subside; to become diminished in volume or in apparent height. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. To fall or go downward; fall to the bottom; decline gradually; enter deeply; as, to sink into the mind. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  21. To fall to the bottom: to fall down: to descend lower: to fall gradually: to fall below the surface: to enter deeply: to be impressed: to be overwhelmed: to fail in strength. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  22. To fall down; descend; enter deeply; be overwhelmed; decline. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  23. fall heavily or suddenly; decline markedly; "The real estate market fell off" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  24. go under, "The raft sank and its occupants drowned" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  25. pass into a specified state or condition; "He sank into Nirvana" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  26. appear to move downward; "The sun dipped below the horizon"; "The setting sun sank below the tree line" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  27. cause to sink; "The Japanese sank American ships in Pearl Harbour" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  28. fall or sink heavily; "He slumped onto the couch"; "My spirits sank" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  29. To descend by force of gravity, as through a fluid; fall; fail; set; decline; cower; droop; shrink. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  30. To cause to sink; to immerse in a fluid; to make by digging; to depress; to degrade; to reduce; to diminish; to waste. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  31. To fall or go downwards, as in water or mud; to go to the bottom; to subside; to penetrate into any body; to settle to a level; to fall or retire within the surface of anything; to decline; to droop; to decrease; to immerse in a fluid; to depress; to degrade; to crush; to reduce; to waste; to dissipate; to make by digging; to invest money permanently in any undertaking or scheme for the sake of interest. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  32. Sinking. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  33. Sunk. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  34. a covered cistern; waste water and sewage flow into it Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  35. plumbing fixture consisting of a water basin fixed to a wall or floor and having a drainpipe Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  36. (technology) a process that acts to absorb or remove energy or a substance from a system; "the ocean is a sink for carbon dioxide" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  37. cause to sink; "The Japanese sank American ships in Pearl Harbor" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  38. The lowest part of a natural hollow or closed basin whence the water of one or more streams escapes by evaporation; as, the sink of the Humboldt River. Webster Dictionary DB
  39. A drain to carry off filthy water; a jakes. Webster Dictionary DB
  40. A shallow box or vessel of wood, stone, iron, or other material, connected with a drain, and used for receiving filthy water, etc., as in a kitchen. Webster Dictionary DB
  41. A hole or low place in land or rock, where waters sink and are lost; - called also sink hole. Webster Dictionary DB
  42. A drain to carry off dirty or superfluous water; in geology, any slight depression of the land, especially one that has no water outlet, or an underground one. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  43. A drain to carry off dirty water: a box or vessel connected with a drain for receiving dirty water. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  44. SINKER. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  45. Trough for carrying off waste water, &c. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  46. A basin connected with a drain, for waste water, etc.; a cesspool. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  47. A drain to carry off filthy water; a basin of stone or wood to receive filthy water; a place of filth. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  48. An open box of wood lined with lead, or one of stone, with a pipe in the bottom for carrying off superfluous or dirty water; that under which anything sinks or descends; that in which corruption, physical or moral, is gathered. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  49. Sank, sunk. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.

Usage examples for sink

  1. I would far rather go with the Vandals to find and sink you. – The Scarlet Banner by Felix Dahn
  2. Why indeed, returned Lady Bellair, but that people sink to their fortunes! – The Marquis of Lossie by George MacDonald
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