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Definitions of sink

  1. embed deeply; "She sank her fingers into the soft sand"; "He buried his head in her lap" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. a covered cistern; waste water and sewage flow into it Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. fall heavily or suddenly; decline markedly; "The real estate market fell off" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. go under, "The raft sank and its occupants drowned" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. pass into a specified state or condition; "He sank into Nirvana" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. appear to move downward; "The sun dipped below the horizon"; "The setting sun sank below the tree line" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. plumbing fixture consisting of a water basin fixed to a wall or floor and having a drainpipe Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. descend into or as if into some soft substance or place; "He sank into bed"; "She subsided into the chair" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. cause to sink; "The Japanese sank American ships in Pearl Harbour" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. fall or sink heavily; "He slumped onto the couch"; "My spirits sank" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. a depression in the ground communicating with a subterranean passage (especially in limestone) and formed by solution or by collapse of a cavern roof Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  12. (technology) a process that acts to absorb or remove energy or a substance from a system; "the ocean is a sink for carbon dioxide" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  13. fall or drop to a lower place or level; "He sank to his knees" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  14. cause to sink; "The Japanese sank American ships in Pearl Harbor" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  15. The lowest part of a natural hollow or closed basin whence the water of one or more streams escapes by evaporation; as, the sink of the Humboldt River. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. To fall by, or as by, the force of gravity; to descend lower and lower; to decline gradually; to subside; as, a stone sinks in water; waves rise and sink; the sun sinks in the west. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. To enter deeply; to fall or retire beneath or below the surface; to penetrate. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. Hence, to enter so as to make an abiding impression; to enter completely. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. To be overwhelmed or depressed; to fall slowly, as so the ground, from weakness or from an overburden; to fail in strength; to decline; to decay; to decrease. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. To decrease in volume, as a river; to subside; to become diminished in volume or in apparent height. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. To cause to sink; to put under water; to immerse or submerge in a fluid; as, to sink a ship. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. Figuratively: To cause to decline; to depress; to degrade; hence, to ruin irretrievably; to destroy, as by drowping; as, to sink one's reputation. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. To make (a depression) by digging, delving, or cutting, etc.; as, to sink a pit or a well; to sink a die. Webster Dictionary DB
  24. To bring low; to reduce in quantity; to waste. Webster Dictionary DB
  25. To conseal and appropriate. Webster Dictionary DB
  26. To keep out of sight; to suppress; to ignore. Webster Dictionary DB
  27. To reduce or extinguish by payment; as, to sink the national debt. Webster Dictionary DB
  28. A drain to carry off filthy water; a jakes. Webster Dictionary DB
  29. A shallow box or vessel of wood, stone, iron, or other material, connected with a drain, and used for receiving filthy water, etc., as in a kitchen. Webster Dictionary DB
  30. A hole or low place in land or rock, where waters sink and are lost; - called also sink hole. Webster Dictionary DB
  31. To fall or go downward; fall to the bottom; decline gradually; enter deeply; as, to sink into the mind. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  32. To cause to go to the bottom; as, to sink ships; make by digging downward; as, to sink a well; place in the excavation made. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  33. A drain to carry off dirty or superfluous water; in geology, any slight depression of the land, especially one that has no water outlet, or an underground one. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  34. Sank, sunk. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  35. Sunk. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  36. Sinking. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  37. To fall to the bottom: to fall down: to descend lower: to fall gradually: to fall below the surface: to enter deeply: to be impressed: to be overwhelmed: to fail in strength. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  38. To cause to sink: to put under water: to keep out of sight: to suppress: to degrade: to cause to decline or fall: to plunge into destruction: to make by digging or delving: to pay absolutely: to lower on value or amount: to lessen:-pa.t. sank and sunk: pa.p. sunk, sunken. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  39. A drain to carry off dirty water: a box or vessel connected with a drain for receiving dirty water. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  40. SINKER. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  41. To cause to sink; immerse; suppress; degrade. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  42. To fall down; descend; enter deeply; be overwhelmed; decline. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  43. Trough for carrying off waste water, &c. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  44. To submerge, as in water. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  45. To dig downward, as a well; cause to descend. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  46. To debase or degrade; diminish; depress; suppress. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  47. To descend by force of gravity, as through a fluid; fall; fail; set; decline; cower; droop; shrink. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  48. A basin connected with a drain, for waste water, etc.; a cesspool. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  49. A drain to carry off filthy water; a basin of stone or wood to receive filthy water; a place of filth. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  50. To cause to sink; to immerse in a fluid; to make by digging; to depress; to degrade; to reduce; to diminish; to waste. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  51. To fall towards the bottom; to subside; to fall gradually; to penetrate; to become lower; to settle to a level; to be overwhelmed; to enter deeply; to decline. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  52. To fall or go downwards, as in water or mud; to go to the bottom; to subside; to penetrate into any body; to settle to a level; to fall or retire within the surface of anything; to decline; to droop; to decrease; to immerse in a fluid; to depress; to degrade; to crush; to reduce; to waste; to dissipate; to make by digging; to invest money permanently in any undertaking or scheme for the sake of interest. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  53. An open box of wood lined with lead, or one of stone, with a pipe in the bottom for carrying off superfluous or dirty water; that under which anything sinks or descends; that in which corruption, physical or moral, is gathered. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  54. A hole or low place in land or rock, where waters sink and are lost; -- called also sink hole. mso.anu.edu.au
  55. A hole or low place in land or rock, where waters sink and are lost; called also sink hole. dictgcide_fs
  56. singk, v.i. to fall to the bottom: to fall down: to descend lower: to fall gradually: to fall below the surface: to enter deeply: to be impressed: to be overwhelmed: to fail in strength.--v.t. to cause to sink: to put under water: to keep out of sight: to suppress: to degrade: to cause to decline or fall: to plunge into destruction: to make by digging or delving: to pay absolutely: to lower in value or amount: to lessen:--pa.t. sank, sunk; pa.p. sunk, sunk'en.--n. a drain to carry off dirty water: a box or vessel connected with a drain for receiving dirty water: an abode of degraded persons: a general receptacle: an area in which a river sinks and disappears: a depression in a stereotype plate: a stage trap-door for shifting scenery: in mining, an excavation less than a shaft.--ns. SINK'ER, anything which causes a sinking, esp. a weight fixed to a fishing-line; SINK'-HOLE, a hole for dirty water to run through; SINK'ING, a subsidence: a depression.--adj. causing to sink.--n. SINK'ING-FUND, a fund formed by setting aside income every year to accumulate at interest for the purpose of paying off debt.--adj. SINK'ING-RIPE (Shak.), dead-ripe, about to fall off.--n. SINK'ROOM, a scullery. [A.S. sincan; Ger. sinken, Dut. zinken.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  57. (sank or now rarely sunk; sunk or in adj. use usu. sunken). Fall slowly down wards, decline, disappear below surface of liquid or below horizon, come gradually to lower level or pitch, droop, despond, subside, settle down, gradually expire or perish or cease, (sun is sinking, sank; my heart, spirits, sank; ship sinks, goes to the bottom; her eyes sank, were turned down wards; his head, chin, sank on his shoulder, chest; voice sinks, becomes lower-pitched, or quieter; sick man, life, is sinking, becoming weaker, dying; prices s., become lower; storm, river, sinks, subsides; ground sinks, slopes down, also comes to lower level by subsidence; darkness sank upon the scene, descended; s. into feebleness, degradation, the grave, a quicksand, a chair; s. in one\'s estimation, lose credit with him; his eyes, cheeks, have sunk in or sunk, fallen inwards, become hollow; so sunken cheeks, eyes; here goes, s. or swim, said in running risks and taking chances); penetrate (intr.), make way, in or into (bayonet sank in to the hilt; impression, lesson, sinks into the mind or memory, becomes fixed; dye sinks in, is absorbed); cause or allow to s., send below surface of liquid or ground, lower level of, keep (trans.) in obscurity or background, conceal, put out of sight, make no reference to, excavate, make by excavating, engrave, (would sooner s. the ship than surrender; s. shaft, well, dig or bore it; s. one\'s head on one\'s chest, let it droop; drought had sunk the streams; s. one\'s title, name, office, &c., keep it temporarily secret, not obtrude it; s. the shop; s. a fact, keep it quiet; s. oneself or one\'s own interests, be altruistic; sinking-fund; s. a die, engrave it; s. money, invest it in undertaking from which it cannot be readily withdrawn, also lose it by such investment; sunk fence). Hence sinkable a. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  58. Place in which foul liquid collects (now usu. fig.; the Chinese quarter is a s. of iniquity); basin or box usu. of lead or porcelain with outflow pipe into which slops are thrown in kitchens &c.; pool or marsh in which river\'s water disappears by evaporation or percolation; opening in stage through which scenery is raised and lowered. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  59. n. A drain to carry off filthy water; jakes;—a shallow box connected with a drain, and used for receiving filthy water, &c., as in a kitchen;— any place where corruption is gathered. Cabinet Dictionary

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