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Definitions of warp

  1. To turn, twist, or be twisted out of a straight direction; to deviate; to swerve; to fly with a bending or waving motion: to cast the young prematurely, as cows. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  2. To twist out of shape, as by shrinkage; distort; bias. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  3. To move (a vessel) by hauling on a rope attached to some fixed object. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  4. To twist the end surfaces of (an aerocurve in an aeroplane) in order to restore or maintain equilibrium. Webster Dictionary DB
  5. To throw; hence, to send forth, or throw out, as words; to utter. Webster Dictionary DB
  6. To turn or twist out of shape; esp., to twist or bend out of a flat plane by contraction or otherwise. Webster Dictionary DB
  7. To turn aside from the true direction; to cause to bend or incline; to pervert. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. To weave; to fabricate. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. To tow or move, as a vessel, with a line, or warp, attached to a buoy, anchor, or other fixed object. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. To let the tide or other water in upon (lowlying land), for the purpose of fertilization, by a deposit of warp, or slimy substance. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. To arrange (yarns) on a warp beam. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. To cast prematurely, as young; - said of cattle, sheep, etc. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. To turn or twist out of shape; to turn from the proper course; to tow (a vessel). The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  14. To turn: to twist out of shape: to turn from the right or proper course: to pervert: to tow or move with a line attached to buoys, etc. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  15. To twist out of shape; turn aside; pervert; tow with a line made fast to anchors, &c. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  16. To turn, twist, or be twisted out of shape; esp., to be twisted or bent out of a flat plane; as, a board warps in seasoning or shrinking. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. to turn or incline from a straight, true, or proper course; to deviate; to swerve. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. To fly with a bending or waving motion; to turn and wave, like a flock of birds or insects. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. To wind yarn off bobbins for forming the warp of a web; to wind a warp on a warp beam. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. To cast the young prematurely; to slink; - said of cattle, sheep, etc. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. To swerve; to twist, as wood; to fly with a waving motion. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  22. To be twisted out of a straight direction: to bend: to swerve: to move with a bending motion. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  23. To be twisted out to shape; bend; swerve. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  24. bend out of shape, as under pressure or from heat; "The highway buckled during the heatwave" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  25. The threads which are extended lengthwise in the loom, and crossed by the woof. Webster Dictionary DB
  26. A rope used in hauling or moving a vessel, usually with one end attached to an anchor, a post, or other fixed object; a towing line; a warping hawser. Webster Dictionary DB
  27. A slimy substance deposited on land by tides, etc., by which a rich alluvial soil is formed. Webster Dictionary DB
  28. Four; esp., four herrings; a cast. See Cast, n., 17. Webster Dictionary DB
  29. The state of being warped or twisted; as, the warp of a board. Webster Dictionary DB
  30. A premature casting of young; - said of cattle, sheep, etc. Webster Dictionary DB
  31. To turn or twist out of shape, or out of a straight direction; to turn aside from the true direction; to pervert; to tow or move with a line or warp attached to buoys or other objects; to cast the young prematurely; to let in the tide for the purpose of fertilizing the ground; to run the yarn off the winches into hauls to be tarred. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  32. To twist or be twisted out of a straight direction; to turn from a straight or proper course; to turn aside from the true direction; to pervert; to prejudice; to tow or move, as a ship to a place by means of a rope laid out for that purpose and fastened to an anchor. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  33. yarn arranged lengthways on a loom and crossed by the woof Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  34. Lengthwise thread in weaving; the tow rope of a boat; a twist, as of a board. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  35. The threads stretched out lengthwise in a loom to be crossed by the woof: a rope used in towing. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  36. Threads stretched lengthwise in a loom to be crossed by the woof; a rope used in towing. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  37. The state of being warped; a twist. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  38. The threads that run the long way of a fabric. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  39. A light cable. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  40. In weaving, the threads which are extended lengthwise in the loom, and crossed by the woof; a rope employed in drawing, towing, or removing a ship or boat; a towing line; a slimy substance deposited on land by marine tides, by which a rich alluvial soil is formed; a premature casting of young. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  41. A rope laid out for the purpose of mooring a ship; a tow-line. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  42. The long threads laid out parallel to each other between which the woof is shot in weaving; the threads lengthwise in a woven fabric, the cross one's being called the woof or weft; muddy deposit cast from waters artificially introduced over low lands. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.

What are the misspellings for warp?

Usage examples for warp

  1. Now he saw why they had called this part of the home the loom shed, for between the two windows stood a cloth loom left just as it had been used, the warp like a tightly stretched veil of white threads, and the web of cloth begun. – The Mountain Girl by Payne Erskine
  2. Somehow he felt that hope and life and Jessamy hung on whether his answer would be Yes or No. His dead father's hand seemed to be weaving the warp and woof of his destiny. – The Heritage of the Hills by Arthur P. Hankins
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