Spellcheck.net

Definitions of brief

  1. (of clothing) very short; "an abbreviated swimsuit"; "a brief bikini" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. give essential information to someone; "The reporters were briefed about the President's plan to invade" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. a condensed written summary or abstract Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. a document stating the facts and points of law of a client's case Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. concise and succinct; "covered the matter in a brief statement" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. of short duration or distance; "a brief stay in the country"; "in a little while"; "it's a little way away" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. Short in duration. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. Concise; terse; succinct. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. Rife; common; prevalent. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. Briefly. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  11. Soon; quickly. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  12. A short concise writing or letter; a statement in few words. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. An epitome. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. An abridgment or concise statement of a client's case, made out for the instruction of counsel in a trial at law. This word is applied also to a statement of the heads or points of a law argument. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. A writ; a breve. See Breve, n., 2. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. A writ issuing from the chancery, directed to any judge ordinary, commanding and authorizing that judge to call a jury to inquire into the case, and upon their verdict to pronounce sentence. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. A letter patent, from proper authority, authorizing a collection or charitable contribution of money in churches, for any public or private purpose. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. To make an abstract or abridgment of; to shorten; as, to brief pleadings. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. A document used to submit a legal contention or argument to a court. A brief typically sets out the facts of the case and a party's argument as to why she should prevail. These arguments must be supported by legal authority and precedent, such as statutes, regulations and previous court decisions. Although it is usually possible to submit a brief to a trial court (called a trial brief), briefs are most commonly used as a central part of the appeal process (an appellate brief). But don't be fooled by the name -- briefs are usually anything but brief, as pointed out by writer Franz Kafka, who defined a lawyer as "a person who writes a 10,000 word decision and calls it a brief."
  20. Short; concise; condensed. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  21. A short statement of a case for the instruction of a lawyer. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  22. To shorten; to make a shortened statement of. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  23. Briefness. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  24. Short: concise. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  25. A short account of a client's case for the instruction of counsel: a writ: a short statement of any kind. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  26. A brief statement of a law-case. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  27. To epitomize; abridge. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  28. Short in time or space; quickly passing; concise; limited. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  29. Any short statement, as of a law-case; an epitome. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  30. A short statement, especially of a client's case for the instruction of counsel in conducting it; a writ summoning a man to answer to any action; a letter patent, authorizing a collection of money in churches for any public or private purpose; a papal letter. In brief, in a few words. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  31. An abridged writing; an epitome; short written instructions to counsel in conducting a case before a court of law. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  32. In general. A written document; a letter; a writing in the form of a letter. A summary, abstract, or epitome. A condensed statement of some larger document, or of a series of papers, facts, or propositions. An epitome or condensed summary of the facts and circumstances, or propositions of law, constituting the case proposed to be set up by either party to an action about to be tried or argued. In English practice. A document prepared by the attorney, and given to the barrister, before the trial of a cause, for the instruction and guidance of the latter. It contains, in general, all the information necessary to enable the barrister to successfully conduct their client’s case in court, such as a statement of the facts, a summary of the pleadings, the names of the witnesses, and an outline of the evidence expected from them, and any suggestions arising out of the peculiarities of the case. In American practice. A written or printed document, prepared by counsel to serve as the basis for an argument upon a cause in an appellate court, and usually filed for the information of the court. It embodies the points of law which the counsel desires to establish, together with the arguments and authorities upon which he rests his contention. A brief, within a rule of court requiring counsel to furnish briefs, before argument, implies some kind of statement of the case for the information of the court. Gardner v. Stover, 43 Ind. 356. In Scotch law. Brief is used in the sense of “writ,” and this seems to be the sense in which the word is used in very many of the ancient writers. In ecclesiastical law. A papal rescript sealed with wax. See BOLL. thelawdictionary.org
  33. Eccl. law. The name of a kind of papal rescript. Briefs are writings sealed with wax, and differ in this respect from bulls, (q. v.) which are scaled with lead. They are so called, because they usually are short compendious writings. Ayl. Parerg. 132. See Breve. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  34. Practice. An abridged statement of a party's case. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  35. It should contain : 1st. A statement of the names of the parties, and of their residence and occupation, the character in which they sue and are sued, and wherefore they prosecute or resist the action. 2d. An abridgment of all the pleadings. 3d. A regular, chronological, and methodical statement of the facts in plain common language. 4th. A summary of the points or questions in issue, and of the proof which is to support such issues, mentioning specially the names of the witnesses by which the facts are to be proved, or if there be written evidence, an abstract of such evidence. 5th. The personal character of the witnesses should be mentioned; whether the moral character is good or bad, whether they are naturally timid or over-zealous, whether firm or wavering. 6th. If known, the evidence of the opposite party, and such facts as are adapted to oppose, confute, or repel it. Perspicuity and conciseness are the most desirable qualities of a brief, but when the facts are material they cannot be too numerous when the argument is pertinent and weighty, it cannot be too extended. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  36. Brief is also used in the sense of breve. (q. v.) 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  37. a type of men's underpants without legs, fitting tightly and held by an elastic waistband; also called Jockey shorts. dictgcide_fs
  38. br[=e]f, n. a short account of a client's case for the instruction of counsel: a writ: a short statement of any kind.--adj. short: concise.--adj. BRIEF'LESS.--adv. BRIEF'LY.--n. BRIEF'NESS.--IN BRIEF, in few words.--KING'S BRIEFS, royal mandates ordering collections to be made in chapels for building churches, &c.; PAPAL BRIEF, such documents as are issued without some of the solemnities proper to bulls.--THE BRIEF AND THE LONG (Shak.), the short and the long.--TO BE BRIEF, to speak in a few words; TO HOLD A BRIEF, to be retained as counsel in a case; TO TAKE A BRIEF, to undertake a case. [Fr. bref--L. brevis, short.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  39. Rife. Medical Lexicon. A Dictionary of Medical Science
  40. Pope\'s letter on matter of discipline to person or community (less formal than bull); (Law) summary of facts& law-points of a case drawn up for counsel (hold b. for, be retained as counsel for, argue in favour of); a b., piece of employment for barrister, whence briefless a. [Middle English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  41. (Law) reduce (facts &c.) to a b.; instruct (barrister) by b., employ. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  42. Of short duration; concise; be b., speak shortly; in b., in short. Hence briefly adv., briefness n. [Middle English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  43. watching-b., of barrister who watches case on behalf of client indirectly concerned. b.-bag, small leather hand-bag. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  44. n. A short writing; a statement in few words;—an abridgment of a client's case for instruction of counsel, hence to give a brief, to engage counsel—a writ. Cabinet Dictionary
  45. Short, concise; contracted, narrow. Complete Dictionary

What are the misspellings for brief?

X