Spellcheck.net

Definitions of drag

  1. To bang so low as to trail on the ground; to fish with a drag; to be drawn along; to proceed slowly and heavily. To drag an anchor, to draw or trail it along the bottom when loosened, or when the anchor will not hold the ship. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  2. To break, as land, by drawing a drag or harrow over it; to harrow; to draw a drag along the bottom of, as a stream or other water; hence, to search, as by means of a drag. Webster Dictionary DB
  3. To draw along, as something burdensome; hence, to pass in pain or with difficulty. Webster Dictionary DB
  4. The act of dragging; anything which is dragged. Webster Dictionary DB
  5. A net, or an apparatus, to be drawn along the bottom under water, as in fishing, searching for drowned persons, etc. Webster Dictionary DB
  6. A kind of sledge for conveying heavy bodies; also, a kind of low car or handcart; as, a stone drag. Webster Dictionary DB
  7. A heavy coach with seats on top; also, a heavy carriage. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. A heavy harrow, for breaking up ground. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. Also, a skid or shoe, for retarding the motion of a carriage wheel. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. Hence, anything that retards; a clog; an obstacle to progress or enjoyment. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. Motion affected with slowness and difficulty, as if clogged. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. The bottom part of a flask or mold, the upper part being the cope. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. A steel instrument for completing the dressing of soft stone. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. The difference between the speed of a screw steamer under sail and that of the screw when the ship outruns the screw; or between the propulsive effects of the different floats of a paddle wheel. See Citation under Drag, v. i., 3. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. Anything towed in the water to retard a ship's progress, or to keep her head up to the wind; esp., a canvas bag with a hooped mouth, so used. See sail (below). Webster Dictionary DB
  16. To pull or draw along by force; draw along slowly or heavily; haul; tug; search by drawing a net or (traw) along the bottom of (the water). The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  17. To draw by force: to draw slowly: to pull roughly and violently: to explore with a dragnet. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  18. To be drawn along the ground; trail; move with difficulty or slowly. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  19. To pull with force or with difficulty; draw along; search with a drag-net. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  20. To pull along by main force; haul. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  21. To search by draging, as for a dead body; search carefully. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  22. To be drawn along, as a rope or dress, on the ground; to trail; to be moved onward along the ground, or along the bottom of the sea, as an anchor that does not hold. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. To move onward heavily, laboriously, or slowly; to advance with weary effort; to go on lingeringly. Webster Dictionary DB
  24. To serve as a clog or hindrance; to hold back. Webster Dictionary DB
  25. To fish with a dragnet. Webster Dictionary DB
  26. To trail along the ground; to move heavily; to lag behind;. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  27. proceed for an extended period of time; "The speech dragged on for two hours" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  28. persuade to come away from something attractive or interesting; "He dragged me away from the television set" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  29. suck in or take, as of air; "draw a deep breath"; "draw on a cigarette" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  30. pull, as against a resistance; "He dragged the big suitcase behind him"; "These worries were dragging at him" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  31. use a computer mouse to move icons on the screen and select commands from a menu; "drag this icon to the lower right hand corner of the screen" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  32. walk without lifting the feet Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  33. To move slowly or heavily. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  34. To dredge. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  35. To draw along the ground by main force; to break land by drawing a drag or harrow over it; to draw slowly, as if heavy and tiresome; to draw along in contempt as unworthy to be carried; to haul about roughly and forcibly; to explore with a drag. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  36. To draw along heavily or slowly; to pull by main force; to pull forcibly or roughly; to draw a heavy body along at the bottom, as of a river or other water; to hang so low as to trail on the ground. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  37. Dragging. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  38. the act of dragging (pulling with force); "the drag up the hill exhausted him" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  39. a slow inhalation (as of tobacco smoke); "he took a puff on his pipe"; "he took a drag on his cigarette and expelled the smoke slowly" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  40. the phenomenon of resistance to motion through a fluid Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  41. clothing that is conventionally worn by the opposite sex (especially women's clothing when worn by a man); "he went to the party dressed in drag"; "the waitresses looked like missionaries in drag" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  42. something tedious and boring; "peeling potatoes is a drag" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  43. something that slows or delays progress; "taxation is a drag on the economy"; "too many laws are a drag on the use of new land" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  44. suck in or take (air); "draw a deep breath"; "draw on a cigarette" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  45. move slowly and as if with great effort Wordnet Dictionary DB
  46. A confection; a comfit; a drug. Webster Dictionary DB
  47. To draw slowly or heavily onward; to pull along the ground by main force; to haul; to trail; -- applied to drawing heavy or resisting bodies or those inapt for drawing, with labor, along the ground or other surface; as, to drag stone or timber; to drag a net in fishing. Webster Dictionary DB
  48. Anything towed in the water to retard a ship's progress, or to keep her head up to the wind; esp., a canvas bag with a hooped mouth, so used. See Drag sail (below). Newage Dictionary DB
  49. A net or hook for dragging along to catch things under water: a heavy harrow: a low car or cart: a contrivance for retarding carriage wheels in going down slopes: any obstacle to progress. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  50. Net or hook dragged over the bottom of water; sledge; contrivance for checking the motion of a vehicle; obstacle or impediment. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  51. The act of dragging, or that which drags or is dragged; a clog; impediment; brake. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  52. A long, high, four wheeled carriage. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  53. A contrivance for dragging and dredging under water; a heavy kind of harrow; a contrivance for retarding the speed of a vehicle by operating on one or more of the wheels; anything that retards movement; slow movement; a heavy sled; a low cart or car. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  54. Something to impede; anything to be drawn along the ground; an apparatus for searching among water for drowned persons, &c.; an instrument for retarding the motion of carriage-wheels when going down-hill; anything that retards or hinders; an obstacle to progress; a kind of cart drawn by the hand; a kind of carriage. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  55. Dragged. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.

What are the misspellings for drag?

Usage examples for drag

  1. One doesn't like to drag her into such a business." – The Complete Project Gutenberg Works of George Meredith by George Meredith
  2. Here goes the count: One- two- three- four-" As he counted, leaving a long drag of two or three seconds between numbers, there was not a change in the figure of the girl. – Riders of the Silences by Max Brand
X