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Definitions of quick

  1. moving quickly and lightly; "sleek and agile as a gymnast"; "as nimble as a deer"; "nimble fingers"; "quick of foot"; "the old dog was so spry it was halfway up the stairs before we could stop it" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. hurried and brief; "paid a flying visit"; "took a flying glance at the book"; "a quick inspection"; "a fast visit" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. performed with little or no delay; "an immediate reply to my letter"; "prompt obedience"; "was quick to respond"; "a straightaway denial" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. with little or no delay; "the rescue squad arrived promptly"; "come here, quick!" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. apprehending and responding with speed and sensitivity; "a quick mind"; "a ready wit" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. any area of the body that is highly sensitive to pain (as the flesh underneath the skin or a fingernail or toenail) Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. easily aroused or excited; "a quick temper"; "a warm temper" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. accomplished rapidly and without delay; "was quick to make friends"; "his quick reaction prevented an accident"; "hoped for a speedy resolution of the problem"; "a speedy recovery"; "he has a right to a speedy trial" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. Characterized by life or liveliness; animated; sprightly; agile; brisk; ready. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. Speedy; hasty; swift; not slow; as, be quick. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. Impatient; passionate; hasty; eager; eager; sharp; unceremonious; as, a quick temper. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. Fresh; bracing; sharp; keen. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. Sensitive; perceptive in a high degree; ready; as, a quick ear. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. In a quick manner; quickly; promptly; rapidly; with haste; speedily; without delay; as, run quick; get back quick. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. That which is quick, or alive; a living animal or plant; especially, the hawthorn, or other plants used in making a living hedge. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. The life; the mortal point; a vital part; a part susceptible of serious injury or keen feeling; the sensitive living flesh; the part of a finger or toe to which the nail is attached; the tender emotions; as, to cut a finger nail to the quick; to thrust a sword to the quick, to taunt one to the quick; -- used figuratively. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. Quitch grass. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. To revive; to quicken; to be or become alive. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. Alive; living; animate; - opposed to dead or inanimate. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. Rapid; swift; as, quick in action; nimble; as, quick on one's feet; alert; ready; as, a quick eye; quick wit; easily excited; hasty; as, a quick temper; sensitive; having life. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  21. With haste; rapidly. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  22. The living flesh; as, the quick under the nail of a finger or toe; the feelings; as, she was hurt to the quick; a hedge of growing shrubs. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  23. Quickly. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  24. Quickness. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  25. 1. Pregnant with a child the movement of which is felt. 2. A sensitive part, painful to touch. 3. Eponychium. A practical medical dictionary. By Stedman, Thomas Lathrop. Published 1920.
  26. Living, moving: lively: speedy: rapid: nimble: ready. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  27. Without delay: rapidly: soon. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  28. A living animal or plant: the living: the living flesh: the sensitive parts. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  29. Having life. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  30. A living person; sensitive flesh; sensitiveness. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  31. Living; brisk; swift; prompt. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  32. Rapidly; soon. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  33. Done in a short time; rapid; swift; alert; sprightly. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  34. Irritable. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  35. That which has life; any vital or sensitive part. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  36. Quickly; rapidly. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  37. Living; done with celerity; speedy; characterized by activity or readiness; sprightly; sharp in discerning; sharp. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  38. Nimbly; with celerity. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  39. The living flesh; sensible parts; living shrubs or trees. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  40. Done or occurring in a short time; active; alive; living; sprightly; ready; swift; nimble. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  41. Speedily; without delay; in a short time. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  42. The living flesh; the living, as "the quick and the dead"; sensitive parts or points; a living plant-applied to the hawthorn. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  43. Alive; living; animate; -- opposed to dead or inanimate. mso.anu.edu.au
  44. Living; alive. "Quick chattels must be put in pound-overt that the owner may give them sustenance; dead need not." Finch, Law, b. 2, c. 6. thelawdictionary.org
  45. Alive; living; animate; opposed to dead or inanimate. dictgcide_fs
  46. The life; the mortal point; a vital part; a part susceptible of serious injury or keen feeling; the sensitive living flesh; the part of a finger or toe to which the nail is attached; the tender emotions; as, to cut a finger nail to the quick; to thrust a sword to the quick, to taunt one to the quick; used figuratively. dictgcide_fs
  47. kwik, adj. living: lively: speedy: nimble: ready: sensitive: hasty: pregnant: active, piercing.--adv. without delay: rapidly: soon.--n. a living animal or plant: the living: the living flesh: the sensitive parts: a hedge of some growing plant, quickset.--adj. QUICK'-AN'SWERED (Shak.), quick at giving an answer.--n. QUICK'BEAM, the mountain-ash or rowan.--adj. QUICK'-CONCEIV'ING, quick at conceiving or understanding.--v.t. QUICK'EN, to make quick or alive: to revive: to reinvigorate: to cheer: to excite: to sharpen: to hasten.--v.i. to become alive: to move with activity.--n. the couch or quitch-grass.--ns. QUICK'ENER, one who, or that which, reinvigorates; QUICK'ENING, the period in pregnancy when the mother first becomes conscious of the movement of the child--from the sixteenth or seventeenth week onwards.--adj. QUICK'-EYED, having acute sight.--ns. QUICK'-GRASS=Quitch-grass; QUICK'-HEDGE, a hedge of living plants; QUICK'LIME, recently burnt lime, caustic and unslaked: carbonate of lime without its carbonic acid.--adv. QUICK'LY.--ns. QUICK'MARCH (same as QUICK'STEP); QUICK'MATCH (see MATCH); QUICK'NESS; QUICK'SAND, a movable sandbank in a sea, lake, &c., any large mass of sand saturated with water, often dangerous to travellers: anything treacherous.--adj. QUICK'-SCENT'ED, having a keen scent.--n. QUICK'SET, a living plant set to grow for a hedge, particularly the hawthorn.--adj. consisting of living plants.--adj. QUICK'-SIGHT'ED, having quick or sharp sight: quick in discernment.--ns. QUICK'-SIGHT'EDNESS, sharpness of sight or discernment; QUICK'SILVER, the common name for fluid mercury, so called from its great mobility and its silvery colour.--v.t. to overlay or to treat with quicksilver.--adj. QUICK'SILVERED.--ns. QUICK'SILVERING, the mercury on the back of a mirror; QUICK'STEP, a march in quick time: (mus.) a march written in military quick time.--adj. QUICK'-TEM'PERED, irascible.--n. QUICK'-WA'TER, a solution of nitrates of mercury and of gold, for water-gilding.--adj. QUICK'-WIT'TED, having ready wit.--ns. QUICK'-WIT'TEDNESS; QUICK'-WORK, the part of a ship under water when laden: the part of the inner upper-works of a ship above the covering board: the short planks worked inside between the ports: spirketting.--SOME QUICK (Spens.), something alive. [A.S. cwic; Ice. kvikr, Goth. kwius, living; allied to L. vivus.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  48. Living, alive, (archaic; esp. the q. & the dead, go down q. into hell; q. with child, orig. with q. child, at stage of pregnancy when motion has been felt); vigorous, lively, ready, sensitive, prompt to act, perceive, be affected, learn, think, or invent, (a q. child, intelligent; q. temper, easily irritated, whence quicktempered a.; q. sight, acute or alert, whence quicksighted a.; has a q. eye, ear, &c., whence quick-eyed, quick-eared, aa.; is q. to take offence; has q. wits, is ready at grasping situation, making repartees, &c., whence quick-witted a.; N.B. these compounds have quick stressed when attrib., unstressed when pred.); moving rapidly, rapid, swift, done in short time or with little interval, (q. succession; at a q. trot; a q. way of doing it; his q. growth; be q., make haste; did a q. mile; was followed by q. vengeance), whence quickly adv.; q.-change (of actor &c.), quickly changing costume or appearance to play another part; quicklime; q. march (mil.), march in q. time (see below; esp. as word of command for starting at usual pace); quick-sand, (bed of) loose wet sand readily swallowing up ships, animals, &c.; quickset, (adj., of hedge) formed of living plants esp. hawthorn, (n.) live slips of plants esp. hawthorn set in ground to grow, hedge formed of these; quick-silver, (n.) mercury, (fig.) mobility of temperament or mood, (v.t.) coat (mirror-glass) with amalgam of tin; q. step, step used in q. time (mil.), rate of marching reckoned at 128 paces of 33 in. to the minute or four miles an hour, the usual British-army rate. (N.) tender or sensitive flesh below skin or esp. nails, tender part of wound or sore where healthy tissue begins, seat of feeling or emotion, (bites his nails to the q.; probed it to the q.; the insult stung him to the q.; is a Tory to the q., through& through); =quickset a. & n. (Adv., with compar. -er, -est, always after vb) at rapid rate, in comparatively short time, (ran as q. as I could; who will be there quickest?); (ellipt. for imperat. of go, come, be, q.) make haste; quick-( prefixed to partt. esp. in -ing) quickly, soon (q.-fading, -forgotten, &c.; q.-firing gun, or quick-firer n., gun with special mechanism for firing shots in q. succession). [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  49. In the Bible, always = living [A.S.]; so a quick hedge, i.e. growing, as distinct from palings; cut to the quick, quicksilver. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  50. adv. Nimbly ; with celerity ; rapidly; with haste; speedily;-- in a short time; without delay; soon ; promptly. Cabinet Dictionary
  51. n. [German] A living animal or plant ; especially, the hawthorn, quickset ;-the part of the body which is sensitive to pain; the living flesh. Cabinet Dictionary

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